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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, September 01, 2003 - 08:34 am:   

Here's a few new things I've been eyeing. Some I've sent for and others I intend to pick up in DC when I'm at WFC. Thought some of you might be interested in them also.

Dale Bailey's got a first collection of stories out, THE RESSURECTION MAN'S LEGACY, from Golden Gryphon.
http://www.goldengryphon.com/forth.html#rml

The incredible Rhys Hughes has a new novel out THE PERCOLATED STARS. I'm a real fan of NOWHERE NEAR MILKWOOD, so this is a must have.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0954226747/qid=1062430300/sr=2-1/ref=sr _2_1_1/202-7508765-6375809

Rick Klaw's GEEK CONFIDENTIAL collects a bunch of his finer reviews, articles and essays. This volume has an intro by Michael Moorcock and a beautiful Picacio cover that is one million cracks.
http://www.monkeybrainbooks.com/Geek_Confidential.html

THACKERY T. LAMBSHEAD'S POCKET GUIDE TO EXOTIC & DISCREDITED DISEASES
The creative imagination meets the JMA in this guide to illnesses that could only be conceived of by the diseased minds of Jeff VanderMeer, China Mieville, Michael Moorcock, Stepan Chapman, Michael Cisco, Rikki Ducornet, Jay Caselburg, Liz Williams,
Jeffrey Thomas, and many more. Beautiful artwork by John Coulthart.
http://www.nightshadebooks.com/diseaseguide.html

Small Beer Press has two new chapbooks out. They both look good.
Ben Rosenbaum's OTHER CITIES
Chris Rowe's BITTERSWEET CREEK
http://www.lcrw.net/smallbeer/chapbooks/index.htm

GREETINGS FROM LAKE WU is a story collection from Jay Lake. Art work for the individual stories and the cover from Frank Wu.
http://www.wheatlandpress.com/lakewu/index.html

More Later.

Jeff

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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Monday, September 01, 2003 - 10:50 am:   

Cool indeed.

Followed the link to Rhys's book, though. "Eylidiad"? "The Smell of Telecopses"? Holy typo errors, Batman!
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 09:01 pm:   

Just got a copy of Zoran Zivkovic's new book, THE BOOK. I'd put a link up for it, but couldn't find a site selling it on-line yet. Go down this message board to the bottom and visit Zoran and ask him how you can get a copy. I've read quite a few of his other books -- The Fourth Circle, Time Gifts, The Library, Steps Through the Mist -- and enjoyed them immensely. I look forward to geting the time to begin this one. If you haven't checked his fiction out yet, I highly recommend it. If you have, then you know.

Best,


Jeff
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Luís
Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 09:54 pm:   

I got THE BOOK today too and I couldn't resist looking inside. The translation (further improved by Tamar Yellin's revision) is superb. I'm currently into Dr Schreber's MEMOIRS OF MY NERVOUS ILLNESS, and Zoran's book will definitely go next.

Here's a sample:

"(The reading of the next twenty-six paragraphs is strongly disapproved for minors or for persons of a prudish disposition. Owing to the nature of the medium, however, no means are available to prevent their doing so. This is not a movie theatre to which such persons could be denied entry, by force if necessary. If the abovementioned individuals choose to succumb to their rampant curiosity and ignore this warning, we disclaim all responsibility for any unpleasant consequences which may ensue.)"

There's a similar notice pages ahead, duly informing "readers of all ages" that it's safe to continue.

Best,
Luís
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Luís
Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 10:17 pm:   

And by the way, Schreber's book falls squarely under the "Cool Stuff" category. I'll blog something about it once it's finished.

Best,
Luís
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 10:28 pm:   

Luis: I couldn't wait. I started THE BOOK tonight also. As for the Freud, man I love that stuff. I don't really get involved with whether it's useful or not or fraudulant in relation to other theories of psychology, I just dig it for itself. It's grandly crackpot. Am I wrong or was Freud the only other non-literary type along with Bergson to win the Nobel Prize for Literature? Maybe it was Russel. Well, if he didn't win it, he should have. One of my favorite lunatics.
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Luís
Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 02:32 am:   

Hi Jeff,

I haven't read Freud on Schreber yet, although I plan to. I'm reading Schreber's own, remarkably lucid account of his madness. (By the way, I found this site on him: http://www.mythosandlogos.com/Schreber.html)

I don't think Freud ever received any Nobel. He was nominated at least once, though, and was terribly pissed off that he didn't win.

Cheers,
Luís
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jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 04:29 am:   

Luis: Thanks for the link. I was unaware that Schreber had written his own account. That's interesting!

Best,


Jeff
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Luís
Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 05:31 am:   

Freud never met Schreber, actually. He wrote his paper chiefly based on the MEMOIRS.

Best,
Luís
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 09:27 am:   

Freud also never won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Although Bersgon did, and Russell. As did other non-literary types like Churchill and Sartre.

I agree with you, Jeff, about the fun of reading Freud for something other than its scientific value. I actually had a blog entry about this recently given that Freud's books are now being retranslated and issued by Penguin for the literary set, sans indexes and footnotes. I'll send it to you.
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JV
Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 09:39 am:   

Re Zoran's book, The Book--Prime Books is putting out the US edition shortly.

JeffV
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Rhys
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 06:05 am:   

Hi Jeff!

Just thought I'd mention how much I enjoyed your introduction to John Gardner's GRENDEL... I've only just gone out and bought that book (which has been on my 'required' list for quite some time!)
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jeff ford
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 08:21 am:   

Rhys: Good to hear from you. Thanks and hope you enjoy Grendel. May the writing flow.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, January 24, 2005 - 06:36 am:   

Steve Aylett recently informed me that his new non-fiction book about the life and work of the great 60's comcis genius, Jeff Lint, will be out soon. If you've never read The Caterer, you're in for a treat. Here's a link with more info about the book:
http://www.steveaylett.com/Pages/LINTpage.html
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Jack Dann
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 05:54 am:   

Dear Jeff,

Checking in, buddy. Interesting you did an intro to John Gardner's GRENDEL. I knew John when he was in Binghamton. He was a lovely guy.

How's by you?
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 06:19 am:   

Jack: Good to hear from you. You can do some gloating down there in the sunny climes as you missed a bitch of a snow storm here this week.
The Grendel intro was a nice way of paying back a little for for me. I was thrilled to do it.
Do you miss Binghamton at all -- Fat Cat Books? Lescron? Tony's Texas Hots? When I think of it now my memories have that fairy tale patina to them. I'm sure at the time it was more Grimm than Andersen, but it was a cool place and Gardner was a trip and a half.
Picked up a copy of The Rebel not too long ago and hope to get to it very soon now that a lot of the writing projects are winding down for a while. Congrats on it. Hope you are well.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 06:26 am:   

This should be a worthwhile reading coming up soon. I know the work of three of these writers and having them all together here in one spot reading has made even me plan to rouse my fat ass off the couch and check it out.
--> The New York Review of Science Fiction
and the
South Street Seaport Museum Present <--

The Eighth of February Writer's Group
Monday, February 7th, 7 o'clock

Hosted and guest-curated by William Shunn, featuring Richard Bowes, Jae
Brim, David Barr Kirtley, Barbara Krasnoff, and Robert J. Howe.

The 8TH OF FEBRUARY GROUP is a private writing workshop specializing in
science fiction and fantasy which meets monthly in Manhattan. It is named
for Jules Verne, the genre pioneer who was born on that date in 1828. The
workshop was founded by Robert J. Howe and William Shunn, both 1985
graduates of the Clarion Workshop, and has just celebrated its first
anniversary.

RICHARD BOWES has published dozens of stories and five books. He has won
the World Fantasy Award and the Lambda Literary Award, and has twice been
nominated for the Nebula Award. Upcoming are stories in Nebula Awards
Showcase 2005, Postscripts 3, and Datlow/Windling's Tricksters; collection
Streetcar Dreams from PS Publishing in England; and novel From the Files of
the Time Rangers from Golden Gryphon.

JAE BRIM's short fiction has appeared in Writers of the Future and Strange
Horizons. She attended Ithaca College and the National Theatre Institute
for acting and directing and the Clarion Workshop for speculative fiction,
and studied theatre in London.

ROBERT J. HOWE has published short fiction in Analog, Weird Tales, Salon,
Newer York, and other markets. His novelette, "Entropy's Girlfriend," is
forthcoming in Analog. He is co-founder, with William Shunn, of the 8th of
February Group.

DAVID BARR KIRTLEY's short fiction appears in magazines such as Realms of
Fantasy, Weird Tales, On Spec, and Cicada, and in anthologies such as New
Voices in Science Fiction. His most recent publication is "Veil of
Ignorance" in the anthology All the Rage This
Year.
<http://www.sff.net/people/davekirtley/>http://www.sff.net/people/davekirtley/

BARBARA KRASNOFF's stories have appeared in the magazines Amazing Stories,
Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, and Descant, and in the anthologies
Memories & Visions: Women's Fantasy and Science Fiction and Such A Pretty
Face. Most recently, her story "Hearts and Minds" appeared in the December
issue of Weird Tales.

WILLIAM SHUNN's short fiction has appeared in Salon, F&SF, Science Fiction
Age, Realms of Fantasy, Electric Velocipede, and other markets. He has
been nominated for the Nebula Award and honored by the Association for
Mormon Letters. His short story "The Ice Queen" is forthcoming in Storyteller.

---
WHEN:
Monday, 2/7/5
Doors open at 6:30

WHERE:
The South Street Seaport Museum's Melville Gallery
213 Water Street (near Beekman)

HOW:
By Subway
Take 2, 3, 4, 5, J, Z, or M to Fulton Street; A and C to
Broadway-Nassau. Walk east on Fulton Street to Water Street

By Bus
Take M15 (South Ferry-bound) down Second Ave. to Fulton Street

By Car
From the West Side: take West Street southbound. Follow signs to FDR
Drive Take underpass, keep right­use Exit 1 at end of underpass. Turn
right on South Street, six blocks.
From the East Side, take FDR Drive south to Exit 3 onto South Street
Proceed about 1 mile.
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Richard Parks
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 08:51 am:   

Almost all the good stuff happens far away from me. Ah, well. What I get for living in the provinces.
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Jack Dann
Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2005 - 05:06 am:   

Hey, Jeff,

Yeah, I do get nostalgic for Binghamton, the old Binghamton, when Binghamton University was SUNY @ Binghamton, spending afternoons in Lescrons, all that. I was in Bingo this last trip, and it's become this vague overlay over the 'real' Binghamton. I guess that's what happens when you leave...

Weather has been stinking hot here, but I heard from Barry Malzberg that it's been cold and snowy--I must admit, I =don't= miss the snow.

Trade paperback of the REBEL should be out soon. Man, it was a trip writing that book. I keep dreaming of doing a center-genre novel.

Be well, my pal.
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2005 - 08:45 am:   

Reading's down the street from my office. If I'm not traveling I'll try to make it. That's a lot of readers!
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 03:59 am:   

I've been meaning to mention this for about two months now. Paul Di Fillippo has written one of the coolest stories called "Observable Things." The concept is awesome -- it's a story that takes place in the time of the Puritans first in America told by Cotton Mather about when he was 13. There is a supernatural entity menacing the good people of New England, and Solomon Kane (Robert E. Howard's Vampire Slayer) is called upon to help track it down. The language and setting are all well-researched and authentic. I may be high on this story because I teach Early American Literature, but even if you don't I bet anyone who likes Fantasy/Adventure tales would like it. *It's in the anthology -- Conquerer Fantastic, edited by Pamela Sargeant.
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Matthew
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 06:41 am:   

Di Fillippo wrote a Solomon Kane story! Cool. Did he have to get permission from Howard's estate or
did he leave the character unnamed or what?
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 07:59 am:   

Matthew: I know the character is named, bit I don't know the answer to your question about the estate. He does a spectacular job of capturing Mather's writing style, though, and making its austerity work in telling the horror tale.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 06:47 am:   

Science fiction writer, Tom Purdom, is writing his memoir and posting installments to his website. The memoir will be a history of each of his published works -- where he got the ideas, what types of literary problems he encountered while writing, what types of techniques used, where he sold them, the editors he dealt with, what was going on in his life at the time. If you're a new writer, this stuff is gold. Even if you're not a new writer. I'm looking forward to reading the installments. Tom has published dozens of stories, five or six novels, has been working in the field for decades and is a wonderful writer (not to mention a good guy). Here's the link:
http://www.philart.net/tompurdom/wiwone.htm
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2005 - 08:13 pm:   

Apparently Steve Aylett is not the only Jeff Lint fan. Just found this link to a new website in his honor. http://www.jefflint.com/
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2005 - 03:19 pm:   

Book of Voices Launch Party
The TOC and details for the book are listed due North in this thread.

For Anyone in the UK, here's the info just in from the Neil Ayres:

For those interested, the Book of Voices officially launches at the Royal Festival Hall, as part of the Africa Remix programme, on 24 March 2005. There will be readings, raffles and live music, as well as the chance to of course buy the book and meet some of the contributing authors and the editorial team behind the book. The launch proper will start at 5pm and go on until 6:45, at which point attendees can disperse to the various bars, restaurants and cafes within the RFH.

If you are interested in attending, please let me know so we can get a rough idea of numbers. Nearest mainline stations are Waterloo and Charing Cross, and closest tubes are Waterloo and Embankment.

The Hayward Gallery is also open as part of the Africa Remix, and attendees will be most welcome to drop in there.

Feel free to diseminate this information.
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2005 - 03:23 pm:   

Sorry, the TOC for The Book of Voices wasn't in this thread. Here it is from another.

For those interested -- I'll have a story, "Boatman's Holiday" in the upcoming anthology Book of Voices (edited by Neil Ayres and company). The book will be published by Flame Books in the UK and the proceeds will go to PEN to support writers in Sierra Leone as part of their Africa05 project. Here's the table of contents.

Book of Voices toc

Foreword, Caryl Phillips
Introduction, Mike Butscher

The Psalm of the Second Body, Catherynne M Valente
The Soul Surgeons, Gregory Norminton
Electric Fence, Gary Quinn
Polenta, Marc Paoletti
Dasi, Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar
Shining the Light, Neil Grimmett
Sally Moore, Yolande Sorores
Home, Moshe Benarroch
Beyond Each Blue Horizon, Andrew Hook
The Universal Age of Deceit, Patrick Neate
No Story At All, Scott Kelly
On the Road to Godiva, Brian James
Boatman’s Holiday, Jeffrey Ford
The Flame, Tanith Lee
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MarcL
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2005 - 03:44 pm:   

Jeff, I just read Purdom's first installment on how he specifically wrote and sold his stories. Thanks for that link--I love this sort of stuff.

I remember reading, when I started out, that the average professional writer accrues about 60 rejection slips before that first sale. This struck me as ridiculous in my case, surely; and if I had actually believed it would take that long, I would have given up early or never started in the first place, if it had been a matter of choice.

Yet...my first professional sale came right around the 60 mark. I love the sense of how hard Purdom worked to get to that first sale.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:08 pm:   

Matthew Cheney of Mumpsimus, SF Site, and Internet Review of Science Fiction, is chronicling his preparations for and perfromance of Shakespeare's Caliban from the Tempest -- one of Fantasy literatures great archetypal characters. Check it out at http://calibanblog.blogspot.com/
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:15 pm:   

I just read a great short essay by Marc Laidlaw about Fritz Leiber. It appeared in Stephen Jones' Horror: 100 Great Books some years ago. I think Marc should put this up on the Night Shade Board if he hasn't already. It's a terrific and insighful piece about an author a lot of people here have expressed admiration for and also gives an interesting picture of a young writer just starting and an older wqriter trying to keep it together. So harrass Marc whenever you get the chance and get him to put the essay up.

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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:26 pm:   

Thanks, Jeff. But I think Stephen Jones would be irked if I put it up here, since he commissioned it for his collection, HORROR: ANOTHER 100 BEST BOOKS. But I'm glad you enjoyed it!
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:28 pm:   

Marc: There's no statute of limitations on that stuff? How long ago did the book come out?

Best,


Jeff
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:30 pm:   

I think I know why you're confused. I also wrote a much longer essay about Leiber and that period in my life ("From Lankhmar to the Tenderloin") which appeared years ago in Steve Brown's SF EYE. Which I fully intend to find and copy and send to you one of these days! That one I would post somewhere if I could be bothered to scan it...

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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:32 pm:   

The one you just read has not been published yet. I sent it because you expressed some interest in the earlier essay, and this was sort of a super condensed version. Sorry for the confusion!
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 05:05 pm:   

Ooops!I screwed up. Never mind. Don't harrass Marc. Instead, just read his new story. Sorry.

http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/originals/originals_archive/laidlaw2/index.html
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rick bowes
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 07:30 pm:   

MarcL:

As I recall, the essay in SF EYE was terrific.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 08:15 pm:   

Why does Winter 1991 seem like last millennium?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 08:23 pm:   

:-)

Any chance I could see yr essay of FL?
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 08:50 pm:   

Done and done! As long as it's understood we're just building the hype machine for the Jones anthology, which I know includes contributions from others on this board: Ellen Datlow, des, and Lucius being the three I know for sure at this point.

I wish Steve Brown would put the whole run of SF EYE online. Someone should approach him about doing that. I guess I should stop waiting for the next issue....
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 08:59 pm:   

I just went through the "tour" of all 15 issues on the SF Eye website (last updated in 1999). Wow, a lot happened in those issues. The last explosion of pre-internet sfnal reflective criticism? It's like a whole bunch of websites and hyperlinked pages crammed into actual paper, with cool scribbles all over everything. (Must drag Ferret back into this place.)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2005 - 10:29 am:   

Lucius has seen an earlier version of my essay on The Playboy book of Horror and the Supernatural probably one of THE books that created my sensibility as a horror aficionado and reader.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2005 - 10:16 pm:   

I've seen that anthology around for years and read many of the stories in it, but never read the collection itself.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2005 - 10:22 pm:   

It's got some amazing stories in it:
Heavy Set by Ray Bradbury
Black Country by Charles Beaumont
Sardonicas by Ray Russell
Weird Show by Herbert Gold
The Sea was Wet as Wet Can be by Gahan Wilson


I've decided to use Gahan's story (yet again--I reprinted it in Blood is Not Enough) and the Beaumont, on SCIFICTION.
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rick bowes
Posted on Friday, March 04, 2005 - 08:52 am:   

I had a bunch, though not all, the SF EYES when I moved from a large apartment to a smaller one a few years ago. Looking at them again, yes, the chaos of the issues, ideas jumping past and through each other, was like a prefiguring of the newsgroups. One of the kids who did the actual moving was happy to find them in the pile of stuff I wasn't going to be able to bring with me and take them away.

I just went through the "tour" of all 15 issues on the SF Eye website (last updated in 1999). Wow, a lot happened in those issues. The last explosion of pre-internet sfnal reflective criticism? It's like a whole bunch of websites and hyperlinked pages crammed into actual paper, with cool scribbles all over everything.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, March 04, 2005 - 10:10 am:   

Yes, the souls of argumentative, opinionated fans have transmigrated from paper to this strange electronic medium. I shudder to think what Lovecraft would have done if he'd had access to newsgroups and forums like this...without being limited by ink, paper, and the consideration of printing...
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Neil A
Posted on Saturday, March 05, 2005 - 09:38 am:   

Hi, Jeff.

Just thought some board regulars might be interested to know that the Book of Voices is now available to pre-order from Flame (cover image on there too):

http://www.flamebooks.com/browseBook.asp?cat=4&catName=Flame%20Books%20Titles
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, March 05, 2005 - 09:53 am:   

Thanks, Neil

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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 07:06 pm:   

If you like anagrams, check out this online anagram maker. Hours of fun.

http://www.anagramgenius.com/server.html
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Sure! On lad
Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 08:26 pm:   

Oddly, 'china mieville' anagrams to 'I'm a vice in hell.'
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Rude Loans
Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 08:28 pm:   

While Michael Moorcock anagrams as 'Mock comical hero.'
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 06:12 am:   

"The Golems of Detroit" by Alex Irvine is coming up in the May issue of F&SF. This is a great fucking story. Don't miss it.

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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 07:57 am:   

I agree. I heard him read it at KGB and immediately asked if I could buy it, but Gordon had already snatched it up.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 03:37 pm:   

Jeff & Ellen, I read "The Golems of Detroit" a couple weeks ago and am interested to see you both post about it here. As you both know, it's an excerpt from Alex's next novel, THE NARROWS. I thought the background to the story was fascinating, and can't wait to see the novel, but I thought "Golems" read very much like an excerpt. Kind of unfinished, incomplete. Maybe I need to re-read it, but that was my first impression. As stories go, I was more impressed by "The Lorelei", which is very strong, and am looking forward to reading "The Life of Riley" in the next week or so.
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rick bowes
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 04:34 pm:   

Alex gave it of the most powerful and evocative readings I've heard recently
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 04:45 pm:   

Jonathan: I was at the same reading with Ellen and Rick, so we're all pretty much coming from the same experience, I think. I don't want to say too many nice things about Irvine as I'm yet to get my copy of JPPN#2 in the mail, but I thought the writing was really tight, it flowed, it captured the time period and managed to project the world of the story really vividly into my imagination. Where I suppose you have a problem is in the plot? I don't want to spoil the story for anyone, but I thought the plot worked well, and I had no idea at the time that it was a piece of a novel. I should talk about how I thought the plot worked, but I'm going to wait until the story comes out and people get a chance to read it. It struck me as very evocative, and I swear I don't think I'd even done any drinking yet. Hold this thought for a month or so.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 05:00 pm:   

I'll re-read it, and then we can talk later.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   

It never occurred to me that it was a novel excerpt.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 07:15 pm:   

Interesting. It is, but I'm interested that it didn't occur. I haven' heard Alex do a reading, but it sounds like he's very good.
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rick bowes
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 08:06 pm:   

I've heard him several times and he's terrific. The stories have always held up when I read them later which I haven't done in the case of Golems. I would say that one summer many years ago I worked on the Republic Aviation F105 assembly line (a scarier thought than golems any day) and his story took me right back there.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 08:08 pm:   

Jonathan: I want to actually check the story out in print too. My only experience with it was that night at KGB. Maybe in print it doesn't come across so strongly, but I really felt it was a pretty powerful piece. We'll see.
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rick1844
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 08:43 pm:   

Suddenly I ask myself why the hell I'm pushing Irvine's stuff.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 08:52 pm:   

Why not? ;-)
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 08:52 pm:   

Because it's good? As a friend of mine is wont to say, he's got the juice. And it's great to be able to recommend something really good to people. Irvine's work is worthwhile and I think he's one of those guys who could pop out a real classic one day.
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rick1844
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 09:20 pm:   

Because he's a big, strapping kid who should be able to take care of himself. Yes, he has enormous potential.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 09:57 pm:   

Rick: What's with the 1844? Is that the year you were born?
And I agree, that's enough talking about how good Irvine is, the fuck knuckle.
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rick bowes
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 11:44 pm:   

rick1844 is my Ebay moniker which I use all the time and which pops up on my computer as one of the choices when I'm asked for my name. And, no, I was born in the year of the Great Flood. I thought everybody knew that.
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Jonathan
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:57 am:   

He's a fuck knuckle <g>. I haven't heard that expression in years.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 07:48 am:   

I've never heard it before but I kind of like it.

Oh, and that's why periodically my name would change--I had a few different versions that would come up and the computer would kind of randomly choose.
But now that I'm using firefox as a browser only "Ellen Datlow" is put into the user name box.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 09:56 am:   

I've never heard it either, but I can't wait to make it the epithet of choice around the office.
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rick bowes
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 10:21 am:   

When I was a kid there was an old derelict in the neighborhood whose nickname was "Uncle Fuck Knuckle." We all said it but I still have no idea what it meant.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 12:20 pm:   

My kid had a good one the other day, calling someone he thought was an idiot a "clown shoe." Have you ever heard that one before? By the way, this time it wasn't me. I like it, though.
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John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 12:57 pm:   

You coming to the reading tonight?

JK
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 01:37 pm:   

I like "clown shoe" but not as much as "ass hat," which is pretty much my favorite.

A few years ago a woman I worked with told me that according to her daughter, "Pod" was the current slang word for genitals. Right after that, they put out a game called "Pod." Then Starbucks introduced its coffee pods. And now i-pods. I laugh every time I see pod used in marketing, and I can only think they're trying to tap into the ironic youth market, except that I've never heard anyone else who heard of "pod" being used in the genital sense.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:42 pm:   

Marc: I'll be using ass-hat, the word that is, before the day is over.

John: Won't be making it tonight, unfortunately, as I am not at home. I'm sure it's going to be terrific with robert and Paul reading. Hope you enjoy it. Maybe Rick is going.
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:44 pm:   

"Clown Shoes" comes to modern day pop culture through the dialog skills of Kevin Smith.

He's popular with the kids.
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rick bowes
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:48 pm:   

The only time I ever saw "clown shoe" used like that is when(under an alias as I recall) he used it in this discussion group.
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rick bowes
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:51 pm:   

And, yes, I'm going to the reading. Am sitting here at the information desk looking at the clock and wondering how early I can cut out and go down the street to KGB.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 08:10 pm:   

Recently had the pleasure of reading an advanced copy of a new anthology edited by Zoran Zivkovic, The Devil in Brisbain. 30 tales of demonic splendor written by Australian writers (with a couple of Serbians added for good measure) -- newcomers and established authors. The book has an introduction by Zoran. I believe it will appear from Prime Books. I was impressed by the unflagging quality of the entire list of fictional creations here.

1. Thomas J. Banks, A DEVIL OF A JOB
2. Lee Battersby, GUNSLINGER
3. Celeste Birt, AN INNOCENT TÊTE-A-TÊTE WITH THE DEVIL
4. K. J. Bishop, BETWEEN THE COVERS
5. Michele Cashmore, THE BLANK PAGE
6. Kylie Chan, CHILD SUPPORT
7. Mark Curtis, LAST NIGHT
8. E. Robert Dobson, VIVA LA REVOLUTION!
9. Lee Dublin, AN HOUR WITH THE DEVIL
10. Grace Dugan, THE DEVIL BEHIND THE LOUVRES
11. Paul Garrety, THE AGREEMENT
12. Hugh C. Gray, FACT: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAIL
13. Lea Greenaway, DEVIL’S DEBRIEF
14. Kristopher Lee Hembury, DOONICE
15. Robert Hoge, AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA
16. Vanda Ivanovi&#263;, THE THIRD STAIR FROM THE TOP
17. Vanda Ivanovi&#263;, THE CONFÉRENCIER
18. Trent Jamieson, NEIGHBOURS
19. Gary Kemble, THE DEAL
20. Chris Lynch, THE PLURIPOTENTIARY
21. Geoffrey Maloney, THE WRITER WHO COULD HAVE BEEN DOSTOYEVSKY
22. Michael S. Martin, A BARGAIN WITH THE WRITER
23. Chris McMahon, ICE CUBE
24. Jason Nahrung, TIME TO WRITE
25. Richard Pitchforth, SHARP
26. Bronwyn Price, DEVIL VERSUS WRITER
27. Michelle Riedlinger, SKIMMING STONES
28. Nigel Stones, HEART AND SOUL
29. Kim Westwood, HABERDASHERY
30. Mirjana Živkovi&#263;, DEVIL’S BLOCK
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 01:00 pm:   

I recognize some of those names from the Brisbane Writers Festival. I went, but couldn't attend Zoran's seminar (where the idea was hatched). I'm looking forward to reading it.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 04:38 pm:   

I've been hearing about it from Zoran since he got back from the festival. Sounds like fun. I look forward to it.
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Zoran
Posted on Friday, April 01, 2005 - 03:41 am:   

I am very grateful for your support, Jeff, Robert & Ellen. THE DEVIL IN BRISBANE is indeed an unusual anthology. But then, I wasn't supposed to edit an usual one, was I?
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Geoffrey Maloney
Posted on Friday, April 01, 2005 - 05:02 pm:   

It was great to work with Zoran on the DinB, and great too to hear that it will be launched by the Brisbane Lord Mayor at the next Brisbane Writers' Festival in September.
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Zoran
Posted on Saturday, April 02, 2005 - 12:05 am:   

Although you'll see on the cover “Edited by Zoran Zivkovic,” THE DEVIL IN BRISBANE anthology shouldn’t by any means be credited only to my humble self. It would have been impossible without the precious contributions of my two assistant editors, Geoffrey Maloney and K. J. Bishop. Among other things, Geoff masterfully edited all the stories, while K. J. produced the excellent cover art. Additionally, both of them contributed stories to the project.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 05:58 pm:   

I'm looking forward to this collection by Greg Frost from Golden Gryphon -- Attack of the Jazz Giants
Here's what publishers Weekly had to say about it in their starred review

Reviewed 2005-05-16
PW
Frost (Fitcher's Brides ) demonstrates his mastery of the short story form in
what will surely rank as one of the best fantasy collections of the year. These
14 well-crafted tales, each illustrated by Jason Van Hollander, take a sympathetic, often witty but always unsparing look at humanity. "Madonna of the Maquiladora" highlights the injustice of godless big business using religion to control the masses. Sorrow, anger and surrealistic allegory merge in "Collecting Dust," in which a child attempts to keep his dysfunctional family from its doom. Turning genre on its head with brio, "A Day in the Life of Justin Argento Morrel" wickedly subverts the space mission tale. "The Road to Recovery," a previously unpublished novella, amusingly mixes a Hope-Crosby road movie with space opera. In the title story, Frost turns Horace Walpole's Prince Manfred into a Southern racist upon whose Castle of Otranto-like plantation rain jazz instruments of destruction. "In the Sunken Museum" nightmarishly explains Poe's last days, while "From Hell Again"
finds horror in Jack the Ripper's pocket watch. Karen Joy Fowler's foreword
and John Kessel's afterword round out this excellent collection. Agent, Martha Millard . (June 1)
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, June 07, 2005 - 01:03 pm:   

In addition to all the World Fantasy Award reading I'm doing, I've been speeding through What If Our World Is Their Heaven? by Gwen Lee and Elaine Sauter. It's a book of interviews conducted with Philip K. Dick just prior to his passing away. Dick's in top form here, especially when describing the next novel he would have written called The Owl in Daylight. You get to see him work through his ideas for this novel and its fascinating. Other great stuff in here too along with a nice intro by Tim Powers.
I've heard there is a new biography of dick out but I have not read anything very good about it. If someone has checked it out and thinks it's really good, let me know. For me to pick it up, it's got to be at least as good as the Sutin book.

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