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Kendrick Goss
Posted on Thursday, November 06, 2003 - 06:57 pm:   

I thought I would start off the visual arts section with a post about what I believe to be some of the most interstitial types of art I have seen and some examples that got me thinking about interstiality in the arts before I had a name for it.

Andy Goldsworthy is a Scottish artist whose art is presented to the world through photography. He photographs earth, sticks, plants and ice (among other things) that he moves around, manipulates. Which makes him sound like a gardener. But his installations are formally sculpture, when presented in public. Except when the arrangements of sticks, rocks and dirt are assembled by people, dancers, I guess, then it is a kind of performance.

(The thing that makes his work most like a performance is its transience, I think. The thing that makes his work most enigmatic for The Art World, as it stands, is that his works are impossible to own.)

Terri Windling recently sent me an article about an American architect (once again, in Scotland) who has constructed a garden with earthworks and plantings integrated with stone, metal, and wood sculptures, each inspired by an equation or law of physics. A beautiful and bizarre construction.

My question to any visitors: is gardening-earth-moving-sculpture-works-type-things a great undiscovered repository of interstitial creativity? Any other examples that spring to mind? (Perhaps I will do a feature on the visual arts page of the web site if I find enough!) Any other strange examples of unexpected visual arts we have overlooked?
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Connie Toebe
Posted on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 11:45 am:   

Hi Kendrick

Well I wish I had seen the message board a little sooner. I was watching a show this weekend that was full of just this sort of stuff. The show was "Victory Garden" on PBS. (Something about the cold wind and leafless trees out my window made watching a show about lush summer gardens sound good.)

In one part of the show they visited a botanic gardens in Quebec. They have a garden competition there every year. The "gardens" they showed were really extraordinary. They certainly pushed the boundaries of what we think of as gardens. The host of the show didn't know what to make of them. They appreared to be designed not by traditional gardeners, but artists and architects.

For one, you had to walk through a forest of hanging, white ribbons with bells on the ends. In the middle was a fenced in area of prarie grasses. Another was bounded around the outside with green glass. It was partially clear and partially reflective so you could see the forest outside but yourself within in as well. There was the question of where the garden ended and where nature started.

I wish I knew which episode of the show this was or what the name of the botanic gardens was. Unfortunately, I didn't expect to be telling anyone about the show. Maybe I'll do a little searching on the internet. If I come up with something, I'll let you know as I think you'd really enjoy it.
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Veronica Schanoes
Posted on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 09:27 am:   

I just wanted to note that there's a very interesting discussion about how we define interstitiality in the visual arts going on in the definitions thread, so pop on over and check it out!
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Terri Windling
Posted on Thursday, November 20, 2003 - 02:00 am:   

There's a good interview with comic strip artist Berkeley Breathed in today's Salon magazine (www.salon.com).

"Balancing creative growth and experimentation with accessibility is the issue of the day for any artist. All I can say is that there's nothing more populist that a comic strip. The comic page is not the place for the whacked-out Jackson Pollocks out there to ram their nutso visions down the readers' throats ... not that I haven't tried that myself. The counterpoint to overexperimentation is being offered 'Blondie' 73 years after it started. But we also have to stay interested ourselves. There's the balance. And balance is the operative word." -- Berkeley Breathed
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Forrest
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2004 - 12:23 pm:   

Hey, just found this, which should be of some interest to interstitialists:

http://www.dracoblu.com/symbolistshow.html

There's some damned good art there.
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Midori
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2004 - 01:32 pm:   

Forrest,

Wow, thanks for the reference! Some of that work is really astonishing.

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