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Jeffrey Thomas
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2003 - 07:17 am:   

I thought it might be interesting, if only for my own purposes, to keep a list of the books I've read thus far in 2003...bearing in mind that I am, sadly, a slow reader. Here's the list thus far, beginning with the first and going sequentially...

THE BUTTERFLY ARTIST, Forrest Aguirre (chapbook of surreal short stories)

BURN, Jonathan Lyons (cyber-noir novel)

THE PEARL, John Steinbeck (have been catching up with the books I was *supposed* to read in high school)
THESE I KNOW BY HEART, Brian A. Hopkins

MEAN SHEEP, Tom Piccirilli

WORD MADE FLESH, Jack O'Connell (brilliantly bizarre noir)

THE GOSSAMER EYE, McLaughlin, Graves, Wilson (Mark McLaughlin steals the show)

CHRISTMAS TREES AND MONKEYS, Daniel G. Keohane

THIRST FOR LOVE, Yukio Mishima

THE TAIN, China Mieville

THE BRAINS OF RATS, Michael Blumlein

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Mastadge
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2003 - 07:37 am:   

Ooh, good idea. :-)

Legend, by David Gemmell
Abarat, by Clive Barker
Swords & Deviltry, by Fritz Leiber
The Chronoliths, by Robert Charles Wilson
Elric of Melniboné, by Michael Moorcock
A Dalliance With the Damned (Lucifer, Book 3), by Mike Carey
Lucifer: Nirvana, by Mike Carey
Saga of the Swamp Thing (Swamp Thing, Book 1), by Alan Moore
Love and Death (Swamp Thing, Book 2), by Alan Moore
Stinger, by Robert R. McCammon
Speaks the Nightbird, by Robert McCammon
Golden Fool (The Tawny Man, Book 1), by Robin Hobb
The Drawing of the Dark, by Tim Powers
Paddy’s Lament, by Thomas Gallagher
Finn Mac Cool, by Morgan Llywelyn
The Straw Men, by Michael Marshall
Mother Ireland, by Edna O’Brien
Light, by M. John Harrison
Station Island, by Seamus Heaney
The Praxis (Dread Empire’s Fall, Book 1), by Walter Jon Williams
Dubliners, by James Joyce
Altered Carbon, by Richard Morgan
Revelation Space, by Alastair Reynolds
The Prince of Lost Places, by Kathy Hepinstall
Stranger Things Happen, by Kelly Link
The Briar King (Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone, Book 1), by Greg Keyes
Force Heretic I: Remnant (Star Wars: The New Jedi Order), by Sean Williams and Shane Dix
Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fictions and Illusions, by Neil Gaiman
The Furies (The Sandman Presents), by Mike Carey
Little, Big, by John Crowley
A Forest Apart (Star Wars), by Troy Denning
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, by Benjamin Franklin
Motherless Brooklyn, by Jonathan Lethem
Glory Road, by Robert A. Heinlein
Pale Fire, by Vladimir Nabokov
Dhalgren, by Samuel R. Delany
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, by Frederick Douglass
Tatooine Ghost (Star Wars), by Troy Denning
Nowhere Near Milkwood, by Rhys Hughes
The Fantasy Writer’s Assistant and Other Stories, by Jeffrey Ford
Girl in Landscape, by Jonathan Lethem
The Anubis Gates, by Tim Powers
City of Saints and Madmen, by Jeff VanderMeer
Roots (Swamp Thing, Book Three), by Alan Moore
A Murder of Crows (Swamp Thing, Book Four), by Alan Moore
Earth to Earth (Swamp Thing, Book Five), by Alan Moore
The Books of Magic, by Neil Gaiman
The Dreaming: Beyond the Shores of Night, by Peter Hogan, Terry LaBan, and Alisa Kwitney
Destiny: A Chronicle of Deaths Foretold, by Alisa Kwitney
Until the End of the World (Preacher, Book 2), by Garth Ennis
Proud Americans (Preacher, Book 3), by Garth Ennis
Valentine, by Lucius Shepard
Swamp Thing: Dark Genesis, by Len Wein
Flyboy Action Figure Comes With Gasmask, by Jim Munroe
Journeys Beyond Advice, by Rhys Hughes
The People’s Choice, by Jeff Greenfield
The Luck of Madonna 13 (The Last Nevergate Chronicles, Book 1), by E.T. Ellison
Life During Wartime, by Lucius Shepard
The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Dixie Fried (Preacher, Book 5), by Garth Ennis
Nemonymous One
Nemonymous Two
Nemonymous Part Three
Broken Angels, by Richard Morgan
Ancient History (Preacher, Book 4), by Garth Ennis
War in the Sun (Preacher, Book 6), by Garth Ennis
Salvation (Preacher, Book 7), by Garth Ennis
Moby-Dick, by Herman Melville
Aztechs, by Lucius Shepard
Waking Beauty, by Paul Witcover
The Portrait of Mrs. Charbuque, by Jeffrey Ford
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Jeffrey Thomas
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2003 - 08:56 am:   

What a list! See what I mean about me being a slow reader? I hope others add their lists as well - thanks for this! And thanks for single-spacing, so your list doesn't dwarf mine any more than it already does! I have list envy now...

Good God, I just read your list again (you probably read another book in the time it took me). Are you sure this is just in 2003? Do you have a job? Do you sleep? :-)
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Mastadge
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2003 - 09:46 am:   

Yes, this is my 2003 list. Or maybe it's since Christmas, 2002. I'm a college student -- and I think that compared to some of the others here, I'm not so fast a reader. I generally read one or two books a week -- there are several graphic novels in there, and they tend to go faster. I sleep about . . . 6-7 hours a night on average, I guess.
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2003 - 11:42 am:   

Jeffrey, I'm a slow reader too. This is my list for 2003:

Life Among the Pirates, David Cordingly
Cargo Cult, Lamont Lindstrom
Time-Gifts, Zoran Zivkovic
The Writer, Zoran Zivkovic
The Library, Zoran Zivkovic
Impossible Encounters, Zoran Zivkovic
Dictionary of the Khazars, Milorad Pavic
Alice in Wormland, Dorothy Hewitt
Perdido Street Station, China Mieville
The Western Lands, William Burroughs
The Fencing Master, Marturo Perez-Reverte
The Day of the Locust, Nathanael West
Veniss Underground, Jeff VanderMeer
The Coral Sea, Patti Smith
Punktown, Jeffrey Thomas
The Monstrous and the Marvellous, Rikki Ducornet
The Strange World of the Quantum, Banesh Hoffmann
The Hearing Trumpet, Leonora Carrington
Deadwood, Pete Dexter

There might be a few others, but I can't remember if I read them this year or last year, so I'll be scrupulous and not list them.

Currently part-way through, in order of finished-ness:
The Crone, Barbara Walker
Swann's Way, Marcel Proust
Petrolio, Pier Paolo Pasolini
The Scar, China Mieville
Leviathan #3
London Bridge, Louis Ferdinand Celine (don't think I'm goung to finish it)
Album Zutique #1

With about 20 in the unstarted pile.


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Jack Haringa
Posted on Saturday, April 26, 2003 - 06:53 am:   

After looking at Mastadge's list, I'm feeling like a slow reader myself. I set a goal of reading at least 100 books this year, though, and finally managed to get myself to keep a reader's journal, so here's the trimester report:

Bellairs, John: The House with the Clock in its Walls
----The Figure in the Shadows
----The Letter, The Witch, and The Ring
----The Curse of the Blue Figurine
D’Ammassa, Don: Servants of Chaos
Golden, Christopher: Prowlers, Laws of Nature
Piccirilli, Tom: The Night Class
Wilson, F. Paul: Reprisal
Lord Dunsany: The King of Elfland’s Daughter
Piccirilli, Tom: Mean Sheep
Dibdin, Michael: The Tryst
Perez-Reverte, Arturo: The Fencing Master
Smith, Michael Marshall: Only Forward
Morris, Mark: The Uglimen
Webb, Don: The Double
Ligotti, Thomas: My Work Is Not Yet Done
Shirley, John: ...And the Angel With Television Eyes
Ross, Adrian: The Hole of the Pit
Marshall, Michael (Smith): The Straw Men
Cady, Jack: Ghosts of Yesterday
Ford, Jeffrey: The Portrait of Mrs. Charbuque
Keene, Brian: The Rising
Irvine, Alexander C.: A Scattering of Jades
Little, Bentley: The Town
King, Stephen: From A Buick 8
Hamilton, Laurell K.: A Kiss of Shadows
Lebbon, Tim: White and Other Tales of Ruin
Grant, Charles: The Tea Party
Kingdom, Will (aka Phil Rickman): Mean Spirit

29 in 4 months...well, one of the good things about being a teacher is all that marvelous reading time you get in the summer.

~Jack~
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, April 26, 2003 - 08:30 pm:   

i'm going to join the list of slow people and drop in my read list that has nothing to do with my research. (which would be an endless list of newspaper articles, at the moment, and a few bits and pieces.)

anyhow, in no particular order:

my century, gunter grass.
city of saints and madmen, jeff vandermeer.
a year in a linear city, paul di filippo.
the true history of the kelly gang, peter carey.
invisibles: the invisible kingdom, grant morrison, plus others.
shade the changing man: american scream, peter milligan, chris bachelo.
summerland, michael chabon.
the art of arrow cutting, stephen dedman.
VAO, geoff ryman.
the other nineteenth century, avram davidson.
american scream: the bill hicks story, cynthia true.
1968, joe haldeman.
after the quake, haruki murakami.
italo calvino, invisible cities.
day dark, night bright, fritz leiber.

and that's about it, i guess. the grass and calvino books had a few thigns to do with my research, but just by chance. still, i might be missing some other things i read, but that's been the gist of it.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Sunday, April 27, 2003 - 09:32 am:   

Listing just the ones I've finished, mine are:

Viriconium / M. John Harrison
The Rubaiyat of Omar Kayyam
Once Were Warriors / Alan Duff
The Tain, / China Mieville
A Year in the Linear City / Paul Di Filippo
Black Sunlight / Dambudzo Marechera
Sinai Tapestry; Jerusalem Poker; Nile Shadows / Edward Whittemore
Cities of the Fantastic: The Invisible Frontier / Schuiten & Peeters
Boulevard of Broken Dreams / Kim Deitch
The Other Side / Alfred Kubin
Adventures in Unhistory / by Avram Davidson
A Universal History of Infamy / Jorge Luis Borges
Phantom Islands of the Atlantic / Donald Johnson
No Longer on the Map / Raymond Ramsey
The Fantasy Writer's Assistant and Other Stories / Jeffrey Ford
The Lost World, by Arthur Conan Doyle
Strange Trades / Paul Di Filippo
1000 Nights and a Night / Volumes 1&2 of the Mardrus & Mathers translation
City of Saints & Madmen / Jeff VanderMeer (re-reading this again)

There are a handful more that I started, read a few chapters in and didn't finish for various reasons. And I'm sure there are some comics I'm forgetting.
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Luís Rodrigues
Posted on Sunday, April 27, 2003 - 10:00 am:   

Great, another Schuiten & Peeters reader! Is The Invisible Frontier already available in English? Beautiful book, that.

I'm a slow reader too. And one with lousy memory, it seems, because I can't immediately recall the titles of all the books I read this year. I have to scan the shelf for that, will give you the list then.

Best,
Luís
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Sunday, April 27, 2003 - 05:10 pm:   

Invisible Frontier is partially available in English. One volume was translated and published, but it's not finished yet, and I'm not sure when the next volume will be put out.

-Robert
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Jeffrey Thomas
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 01:44 pm:   

I'm so glad others have added their lists...this is fascinating. I see a lot of books listed that I've read in past years. Ah, Robert - THE OTHER SIDE by Kubin was wonderful (a gift from Michael Cisco). K. J., you've read PERDIDO *and* all those other books this year? A book as thick as that or THE SCAR can take me months. I just finished Clive Barker's weighty EVERVILLE, sequel to GREAT AND SECRET SHOW which I read back in 91. Though it had some degree of Barker's almost unequaled imagination, I was disappointed with it overall. Much prefer his short stories. K. J., I also see you have a number of books going at any one time, as do I. Today I began AMERICAN PSYCHO and I'm about halfway through Burrough's CITIES OF THE RED NIGHT, which I'm loving. And I have about a dozen or more short story anthologies going...those might take years to finish!
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 03:47 pm:   

Jeffrey, to balance Perdido, most of those other books are on the slim side. And I did read Perdido at faster than my usual pace - I would have liked to linger with it a bit more, but life is short.
But now, yeah, of the ones I'm reading, The Scar, Swann's Way, Petrolio and Leviathan are all fatties. I've been reading the Buroughs trio in reverse order - haven't got to Cities of the Red Night yet.
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 06:19 pm:   

This year, eh? Not as good as I hope, I suspect. I spent the first two months of the year proofing and editing the next issue of Electric Velocipede, so this is mostly since the end of February when I had more free time (read: commuting for over an hour each way on the train).

Ford, Jeffrey: The Physiognomy
----: Memoranda
Link, Kelly: Stranger Things Happen
Vuckevich, Ray: Meet Me in the Moon Room
Emshwiller, Carol: Report to the Men's Club
----: The Mount
Cook, Glen: The Black Company
----: Shadows Linger
----: The White Rose
----: The Silver Spike
MacLeod, Ken: The Sky Road
----: The Star Fraction
Callenbach, Ernest: Ecotopia
Fielding, Helen: Bridget Jones' Diary
Nemonymous One
Nemonymous Two

I think that's it. <sigh> Not very good.

JK
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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 07:05 pm:   

What did you think of the Black Company books? It's been a while since I read that trilogy. . .
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Montmorency
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 07:37 pm:   

It's bad to see someone else's reading lists. They always seem far attractive than mine, and I'm obliged to add more than I can read to the pile. Worse, I'm Japanese and my reading speed is halved when I read in English, and I have other Japanese books to read, and I have full time job. Still, all my free time is dedicated to wonderful authors like you who appear in these boards here.

My mixed crew so far this year, including kids' books (Japanese titles are excluded):

Barry, Max: Jennifer Government
Bowler, Tim: Starseeker
Brennan, Herbie: Faerie Wars
Carey, Edward: Alva & Irva
Carrington, Leonora: The Hearing Trumpet
Carroll, Jonathan: The Land of Laughs
Carroll, Jonathan: White Apples
Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness
Di Filippo, Paul: A Year in the Linear City
Dickinson, Charles: A Shortcut in Time
Doctorow, Cory: Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom
Ducornet, Rikki: Phosphor in Dreamland
Ducornet, Rikki: The Fan-Maker's Inquisition
Emshwiller, Carol: The Mount
Eskridge, Kelley: Solitaire
Ford, Jeffrey: The Portrait of Mrs. Charbuque
Greenland, Colin: Finding Helen
Haddon, Mark: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
Harrison, M. John: Light
Jackson, Shirley: We Have Always Lived in the Castle
Joyce, Graham: The Facts of Life
Kenyon, Kay: Maximum Ice
Knipfel, Jim: The Buzzing
Kurzweil, Allen: A Case of Curiosities
Lightman, Alan: Einstein's Dreams
Lowachee, Karin: Warchild
MacLeish, Roderick: Prince Ombra
McCarthy, Wil: Wellstone
Metzger, Robert A.: Picoverse
Millhauser, Steven: Enchanted Night
Moon, Elizabeth: The Speed of Dark
Nicholson, Scott: The Red Church
Patchett, Ann: Bel Canto
Pearl, Matthew: The Dante Club
Perez-Reverte, Arturo: The Club Dumas
Pierre, DBC: Vernon God Little
Priest, Christopher: The Separation
Priestley, Chris: Death and the Arrow
Sebold, Alice: The Lovely Bones
Simmons, Dan: A Winter Haunting
Wallace, Daniel: The Watermelon King
Williams, Liz: Empire of Bones
Wooding, Chris: Poison
Wright, John C.: The Phoenix Exultant

The best so far is Bel Canto by Ann Patchett.
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John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 08:12 am:   

Actually, there are 9 Black Company books. I think Cook is vastly underrated by the general populace. He takes a chance with each Black Company book by changing the narrative style. My favorite is told by a character who is cursed to jump back and forth through time. He never knows exactly 'when' he is and neither does the reader. It was done really well and a lot of fun to read.

JK
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Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 08:16 am:   

I know there are more than three, but I've only read the original Annals of the Black Company trilogy in the collected SFBC hardcover edition.
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John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 08:26 am:   

These were the first books I've re-read in more than 10 years. I read them years ago, but re-read this year after finishing the series this last fall. Or at least what currently makes up the series. These are some of the best fantasy novels out there. They are not your typical Tolkien-eaque, huge fantasies with a small band of characters heading out to battle the biggest baddy in the land. These are basically stories about a company of men who hire out their swords to whomever has the most gold. The story gets more complex when the company decides to head south and uncover their roots, but that only adds to the series. Cook has done a masterful of making the books feel complete while leaving them open enough to continue writing if he chooses.

What did you think, Mastadge? Did they make you want to read more Black Company books, or are you less enamoured of the series than me?

JK
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 12:11 pm:   

Glen Cook reminds me a bit of that other underrated Cook, Hugh (The Wizards and the Warriors, The Walrus and the Warwolf et al). Believable characters with grit under their fingernails. I've only read the first four in the Black Company. I did think the story wavered towards the silly sometimes, but that aside I was impressed.
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Jeffrey
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 06:16 pm:   

Question: A coworker has urged me to read a novel called THE MASTER AND MARGARITA by a Russian author named Bulgakov or Bulgingcrotch or something; anyone read this? (Previously this coworker's inspired me to read Camus' THE STRANGER and THE PLAGUE, and I've got him to read LOLITA, Mishima's SAILOR WHO FELL FROM GRACE WITH THE SEA and Hardy's TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES.)

Also, have never read NAKED LUNCH but want to, and I see there is now a "revised" or "corrected" version or some such, which one reader at Amazon reacted violently towards. Any thoughts on which NL I should acquire?
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 06:37 pm:   

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA - yes! It's absolutely wonderful. You won't regret reading it.
Apparently in one translation the characters constantly and irritatingly call each other 'comrade', and you're better off with one of the other translations, but I don't know which is the best one. I borrowed it off a friend - I can find out which version it was, if you like.
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JeffV
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 07:00 pm:   

The Master and Margarita is brilliant. To be honest, though, the comrade version is the more correct version, and I preferred it. The other version strips away a lot of Bulgakov's original intent.

JeffV
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JeffV
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 07:02 pm:   

Glen Cook's Dread Empire Trilogy, from back in the 1980s is tons better than the Black Company stuff. It was part of what made me want to write. Beautiful, grim, stunning stuff.

JeffV
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 07:51 pm:   

Re M&M: Damn, I hate it when I think I'm passing on good advice and it turns out to be bad advice. Now I want to find the comrade version.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 07:57 pm:   

I read the Mirra Ginsburg translation of The Master & Margarita. There were two translations at the local bookstore, I read the first chapter of both and picked the one that had a better flow for the writing. I'm not sure how acurate of a translation it was though.

-Robert
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Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 08:13 pm:   

I honestly don't remember much of The Black Company. I remember being intrigued that our heroes were pretty much a pack of assholes, because when I read those books I hadn't yet seen anything like that. I remember enjoying them, but I also remember I had to take a break between each one, which bugged me at the time because usually when I read a series I can go straight through it without interruption.

The thing I remember most about Black Company was realizing that the MYTH computer games had ripped off the plot. Which was okay with me, because those two games have been my favorite video games for years, and are pretty much the only games I ever play on my computer anymore.
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JeffV
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 08:40 pm:   

It's the Mira Ginsburg one I like. The comrade stuff is good because it preserves Bulgakov's satire of Soviet writing groups, etc. Which adds yet another level to the book. But I haven't read all of the other translation, so perhaps it has it's virtues, too.

Boy, those Glen Cook Dread Empire books are good. Not to mention, he had a claustrophobic battle cruiser novel that read like one of the best submarine novels you've ever read. I mean, this guy is severely underrated in my opinion. He can write, and although he has lately been churning out series and writing on autopilot, he may again awaken.

JeffV
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Jeffrey
Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - 12:52 pm:   

Thanks, folks, for the feedback on MASTER AND MARGARITA; will definitely order it, and I think I'll probably go with the "comrade" edition if it preserves the author's intent. Interesting, and distressing, how a translator can impact a work. When I read Camus' THE STRANGER, it was a newer translation, wherein the protagonist refers to his mother in the more-child like term of "Maman" rather than the dry and formal "Mother" of the earlier translation. A small thing, but it subtly implies a difference in the relationship between mother and son. I like when a translator is sensitive to even such a detail. I recently read Mishima's THIRST FOR LOVE, as I mentioned, and while it was great, I thought THE SAILOR WHO FELL FROM GRACE WITH THE SEA had a more agreeable prose style. Different translators. But how do I know which one is "truer" to Mishima's style? Anyway, I used a quote from Dante in PUNKTOWN, and I like to read that same quote from every edition of INFERNO I can find...amazing how they can vary in wording. Again, this issue of the author's intent makes me concerned which edition of NAKED LUNCH to read. But I think Robert's notion of reading a bit from two versions of a book to get a feel for the flow is also a good one...
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JeffV
Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - 02:04 pm:   

What's particularly disturbing about the one version that omits comrade is that Bulgakov had so much trouble with Soviet censors. At one point, he actually burned a bunch of manuscripts out of fear of being found out as an enemy of the state. So while I understand the urge by a translator to "update" what's seen as a dated version, it's a misguided impulse re Bulgakov, especially considering what he went through.

Anytime I think of writers in the U.S. complaining about poor sales or not being able to crack the mainstream, I think of Bulgakov, in fear of his life--or V. Grossman, who could not publish his masterwork, Life & Fate, during his lifetime and but for a smuggled-out version, it would have been lost forever. If you want to read about the battle of Stalingrad, there's nothing more surreal or moving or just plain strange than the scene in Grossman's novel where the flocks of starlings begin, after several months of battle, to mimic the sound of mortar fire as it shrieks across the sky.

There's a scene with a cat and a corrupt party member in the Master and M. that is one of the funniest, cleverest things I've ever read.

JeffV
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GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - 08:27 pm:   

Here's my list:

White and other Stories - Tim Lebbon
Black Projects, White Knights - Kage Baker
The School of Night - Alan Wall
Nowhere Near Milkwood - Rhys Hughes
Quin's Shanghai Circus - Ed Whittemore
Prince Zaleski - MP Shiel
Facts of Life - Graham Joyce
Thirdy Cry to legba - MW Wellman
Revelation Space - Alastair Reynolds
Kalpa Imperial - Angelica Gorodischer
Pattern Recognition - William Gibson
Savage Membrane - Steve Niles
Sideshow - Thomas Ligotti
Sinai Tapestry - Ed Whittemore
Gardens of the Moon - Steve Erikson
Icefields - Thomas Wharton
The Tomb - F Paul Wilson
Altered Carbon - Richard Morgan
Invaders from the Dark - Greye La Spina
Pleasant Dreams - Robert Bloch
Strayers from Sheol - HR Wakefield
Legacies - F Paul Wilson
Declare - Tim Powers
Deadhouse Gates - Steve Erikson
The Tain - China Mieville
Hell! Said the Duchess - Michael Arlen
Exploits of Engelbrecht - Maurice Richardson
Sombra de la Sombra - Paco Ignacio Taibo
Scroll of Thoth - Richard Tierney
Notable American Women - Ben Marcus
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BenO
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 12:36 pm:   

And mine:

The Best Tales of Hoffmann – E.T.A. Hoffman
The Dragons of Springplace – Robert Reed
Mapping the Mind – Rita Carter
Persuasion – Jane Austin
The Robot's Twilight Companion – Tony Daniel
Altered Carbon – Richard Morgan
Sir Apropos of Nothing – Peter David
The Best of Jack Vance – Jack Vance
Plowing the Dark – Richard Powers
Atom: A Single Oxygen Atom's Journey from the Big Bang to Life on Earth...and Beyond - Lawrence M. Krauss
What the Fuck: The Avant-Porn Anthology – Michael Hemmingson (editor)
A Year in the Linear City – Paul di Filippo
Palace of Dreams – Ismail Kadare
Polyphony 1 - Lake & Layne (editors)
The Gray's Anatomy – Rachel Armstrong
Days – James Lovegrove
The Secret Service – Wendy Walker
What Evolution Is – Ernst Mayr
Shogun – James Clavell
Beyond the Curve – Kobo Abe
Black Wind – F. Paul Wilson
David and the Phoenix – Edward Ormondroyd
J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century – T. A. Shippey
The Moor's Last Sigh – Salman Rushdie
City of Saints and Madmen (HB) – Jeff VanderMeer
The Pied Piper's Poison – Christopher Wallace
The Sinners of Erspia – Barrington Bayley
The Fantasy Writer's Assistant and Other Stories – Jeffrey Ford
Prisoner's Dilemma: John Von Neumann, Game Theory and the Puzzle of the Bomb – William Poundstone
This Shape We're In – Jonathan Letham
The Etched City – J. K. Bishop
The Mirror of Kong Ho – Ernest Bramah
A Barrel of Laughs, a Vale of Tears – Jules Feiffer
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Jeffrey
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 12:52 pm:   

More impressive lists.

Back to Bulgakov; the "comrade" version is the one my coworker read, and he seemed delighred with the frequent use of the word...and found it particularly funny used in the cat scene you mention, Jeff. Yes, really must get this.

Anyone know the title of Ballard's book that, as I understand it, is about someone stranded on a traffic island? That concept sounds great!
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Mastadge
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 01:06 pm:   

Ben,

What did you think of SIR APROPOS and THIS SHAPE WE'RE IN?
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BenO
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 01:43 pm:   

Jeffrey,

The Ballard you're looking for is Concrete Island, a great book. High Rise, a book about the inhabitants of a luxury highrise who descend into a state of tribal floor to floor warfare is another favorite Ballard novel of mine.
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BenO
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 01:44 pm:   

Mastage,

I don’t think I would recommend SIR APROPOS – the “hero” is (intentionally) a totally unlikable cad. You’re supposed to just wink and go along with the satire, but there’s no meat to the satire and the whole thing is just too caustic. It’s not that well written either.

On the other hand, Lethem’s THIS SHAPE WE’RE IN, is a wonderful little book (only 55 pages). Hard to describe, but a joy to read.
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BenO
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 01:46 pm:   

More on THE MASTER AND MARGARITA: I’ve only read the Ginsburg translation, which, although it’s a wonderful read, lacks the detailed end notes that the Burgin and O’Connor translation has. There’s a lot going on in M & M, what with Stalinist satire, the Pontius Pilate/Jesus/Satan story, the Master, and plenty of Faustian references. I talked my fiction book club into reading it recently, with half the group reading the Ginsburg and half reading the Burgin/O’Conner. Everyone loved it, but there was still plenty of head scratching going on at the end of the discussion.

There’s actually a critical analysis of M & M that I’ve been tempted to pick up: The Master & Margarita: A Critical Companion by Laura W. Weeks.

Anyhow, M & M is an incredible book and one that rewards rereads. The comedic elements are hysterical as well (I loved Behemoth, the Devil’s cat so much that I adopted the moniker BehemothCat as my name in another forum).
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Forrest
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 08:37 pm:   

You all amaze me. My turn, feeble as it is:

Read in 2003:

The Journal of Experimental Fiction 24
Black Warrior Review 29:1
3rd Bed 7

Currently Reading:

CISTERN TAWDRY, Eckhard Gerdes
STREETS THAT SMELL OF DYING ROSES, Prakash Kona
Album Zutique 1
AND THE ASS SAW THE ANGEL, Nick Cave
THE ETCHED CITY, KJ Bishop
. . . and a whole slew of stories for Leviathan 4, plus some novel MSS, all of which will ensure that my "finished in 2003" list remains rather short.

Such is the life of an editor! :-) I can take solace in the fact that I'm reading some great work that hasn't made it into the public eye . . . yet.

Forrest
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Matthew Martens
Posted on Saturday, May 03, 2003 - 03:14 pm:   

I stumbled across these boards while kicking around Jeff VanderMeer's Veniss Underground site, and after a few days of amazed lurking -- amazed to find all of you wonderful writers and readers in the same place shooting some high quality bull -- I feel like I should contribute something, and this seems like just thread to jump in with. So, without further ado, here's my own list of 2003 reading, to the best of my memory, from the top on down to today:

Andrei Tomine - Summer Blonde
Alfred Kubin - The Other Side
Neil Gaiman - The Sandman Vols. 7-10
Ian Kershaw - Hitler: Nemesis 1889-1936
Alice Sebold - The Lovely Bones
Glen Hirshberg - The Snowman's Children
Patrick McGrath - Spider
John Banville - The Book of Evidence
Michel Houellebecq - The Elementary Particles
David B. - Epileptic Vol.1
Taiyo Matsumoto - Black & White Vols.1+2
Jeff VanderMeer - City of Saints and Madmen
Elliot Neaman - A Dubious Past: Ernst Junger and the Politics of Literature After Nazism
Ernst Junger - The Glass Bees
Dan Chaon - Fitting Ends
Dan Chaon - Among the Missing
Ted Chiang - Stories of Your Life and Others
Brian Hodge - Lies & Ugliness
Carol Emshwiller - The Start of the End of it All
Steven Millhauser - Inside the Penny Arcade
Steven Millhauser - The Barnum Museum
Jonathan Carroll - The Panic Hand
Rikki Ducornet - The Complete Butcher's Tales
Thomas Bernhard - The Voice Imitator
Thomas Ligotti - My Work is Not Yet Done
Paul Euard - Capital of Pain
Sylvia Townsend Warner - The Innocent and the Guilty
Eric Hobsbawm - The Age of Revolution
John Banville - The Newton Letter
Russell Kirk - The Princess of All Lands
Jeffrey Thomas - Aiiieee! (or something to that effect)
Jeffrey Ford - The Fantasy Writer's Assistant and Other Stories
Steve Aylett - Toxicology
Roman Dirge - Lenore: Noogies (and also Wedgies)
Joseph Payne Brennan - Stories of Darkness and Dread

I think that's about it for single-author books. Just digging into Conjunctions: 39 and Leviathan 3. Lots of "new fabulist" reading in the queue --I'm doing an annotated bibliography in that nebulous (in a good way), exciting area to complete my MLS this summer. Which makes it very cool indeed that so many of the authors I'll be writing about are here on these boards. Should make for good lurking! Back to it ...

--Matthew
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Jeffrey
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 06:19 am:   

Hi, Matthew. The title's AAAIIIEEE!!! (3 of each letter, etc.). Why do people have a problem with this? :-) Interesting to see some books turning up again and again on these lists, like Paul Di Filippo's wonderful YEAR IN THE LINEAR CITY, K. J. Bishop's great ETCHED CITY, Jeff VanderMeer's brilliant CITY OF SAINTS AND MADMEN (which, Jeff, if you're listening, a friend in Germany just ordered). Thanks, Ben...I'll *definitely* order CONCRETE ISLAND, and HIGH RISE sounds fantastic - like a cross between Jeff VanderMeer's SECRET LIFE and LORD OF THE FLIES. (Watched this film on DVD last night so it's fresh in my mind; I must do a separate thread on DVD lists, too, I think.)
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Jeffrey
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 06:21 am:   

...that is to say, the b/w Peter Brook version of LORD OF THE FLIES. Though I've never seen it, I'm VERY dubious about the color remake, which I guess turns the British kids to Americans and has a wounded adult among the children, which I think is all wrong, wrong, wrong.
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JeffV
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 07:05 am:   

It also turns Piggy into a real pig who talks. Which I think is more than wrong--I think someone should be arrested for it.

JeffV

PS Hi, Matthew!
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JeffV
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 07:08 am:   

I am working on a new story cycle, by the way, called "The Newcrobpunk Linear Well-Built Etched Ambergris" cycle. In which I plan to assimilate all who threaten Ambergris' sovereignty. Bwaaahaaahaaahaaaaahaaaaahaaaahaaaahaaaa! Aaaiiieee!

JeffV
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John Klima
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 01:54 pm:   

JeffV:

I just ordered "The Newcrobpunk Linear Well-Built Etched Ambergris" from Amazon. Can't wait to get it.

JK
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 03:13 pm:   

It is interesting to see some books come up on multiple lists. There is a chance everybody's reading them, but they don't actually like them. Luckily, that doesn't seem to be the case here. I think the Etched City will be on my next book order. And Rikki Ducornet - The Complete Butcher's Tales sounded like something I would enjoy.

I did manage to add 3 more books to my list over the past week:

Album Zutique #1 (I was almost finished when this thread started)
Seven Touches of Music / Zoran Zivkovic
Forgotten English / Jeffrey Kacirk

I liked the first two, but Forgotten English I'm ambivilent towards. Some of the words didn't strike me as forgotten: press gang, cod piece, lycanthrope, flunkey, bowdlerize, succubus, ambergris, balderdash, wassail and a few others. Maybe not commonly used, but forgotten? Flunkey seems especially out of place in the book. But it did introduce me to a few words which could be useful (mumpsimus, mocteroot, spleenful).

-Robert
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Matthew Martens
Posted on Sunday, May 04, 2003 - 03:17 pm:   

Jeffrey -- mea maxima culpa on the incorrect Aaaiiieee!!! spelling. Besides the Fantastic Metropolis reprint of The Palace of Nothingness (a really marvelous, weird, wrenching story), Aaaiiieee!!! is all I've read of yours so far, but Punktown is on the way, and the Hades book I pre-ordered from Shocklines. "Rat King" is an absolute killer -- what could have been offensive and exploitative is instead extremely moving even as it chills completely. I very much look forward to reading more of your work.

Another screw-up on my list: Summer Blonde (a pretty good collection of Clowes-ian confessional comics) is by Adrian, not Andrei, Tomine. He (Adrian, that is) has done better elsewhere, I think.

Jeff V. -- Hello! Thanks to City of Saints and Madmen, I intend to get down to reading Nabokov's Invitation to a Beheading after finishing David Markson's Wittgenstein's Mistress this week. By the end of that, my copy of Veniss Underground ought to be here ... this seems to be a good time for unusual literature loosely moored to the traditions of the fantastic.

--Matthew
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 01:02 pm:   

Montmorency:

What did you think of JENNIFER GOVERNMENT? Amazon keeps recommending it to me, but I haven't heard anything about it.

In other news, I just picked up ALTERED CARBON this last weekend, and spent an hour figuring out that I can add at least three more shelves into my mass-market shelving unit, and could add at least one shelf each to the rest of my bookshelves. Now I just need to convince the wife.

JK
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Jeffrey
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 02:59 pm:   

You're forgiven, Matthew, because of your kind compliments. PALACE OF NOTHINGNESS was China Mieville's favorite in PUNKTOWN (interesting to see which stories people like best in there; Paul Di Flippo's was PRECIOUS METAL, my own favorite is REFLECTIONS OF GHOSTS, etc.) I hope you enjoy PUNKTOWN, and I think HADES is one of the best things I've done. It *should* be out this month.

In the mail today I just received ONCE UPON A SLIME, a collection of zany campy surreal humorouis horror by Mark McLaughlin, the only person who can make me read zany campy surreal humorous horror.
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E Thomas
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 08:25 pm:   

It also turns Piggy into a real pig who talks.

No way. That is very messed up.
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Montmorency
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 08:34 am:   

Hi John,

Re: JENNIFER GOVERNMENT

I'm a fan of slapstick, so I enjoyed the absurd romp in hip narrative something like electrified Hiaasen. Other than that, it's not particularly remarkable: premises are mundane (The Space Merchants 2003: American Corporations Rule All), story is barely science fictional, and its satire is superficial.

Still a fun read. It reminded me of James Stevens-Arce's Soulsaver and Neal Stephenson's Zodiac. Incidentally, its protagonist and antagonist strangely echo Thursday Next and Acheron Hades from The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde; almost the same characters in a different setting.
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Bill B.
Posted on Monday, May 19, 2003 - 12:57 pm:   

Very interesting lists! I see I have quite a bit of overlap with Jack Haringa in particular (well, 3 books, but I'm also reading a John Bellairs novel right now), so here is my tiny, that is, "easy-to-manage" list:

Pears, Iain: An Instance of the Fingerpost
Marshall, Michael (Michael Marshall Smith): The Straw Men
Ligotti, Thomas: Sideshow and Other Stories
Asquith, Cynthia: What Dreams May Come
Carter, Angela: The Passion of New Eve
Charlton, William: Undesirable Guests and Other Stories
Keene, Brian: The Rising
Heron-Allen, Edward: The Collected Strange Papers of Christopher Blayre
Chetwynd-Hayes, R.: Tales from Beyond
Cardin, Matt: Divinations of the Deep
Burt, Steve: Odd Lot
Wilson, Robert Charles: The Perseids and Other Stories
Firbank, Ronald: The Flower Beneath the Foot
VanderMeer, Jeff (ed.): Album Zutique #1
Finch, Paul: Cape Wrath
Protter, Eric (ed.): A Harvest of Horrors
Pérez Reverte, Arturo: The Fencing Master
Jones, Stephen and David Sutton (ed.): Dark Voices 5: The Pan Book of Horror


Jeff V. has professed he has a "literary blind spot" for Robert Anton Wilson & Robert Shea's Illuminatus trilogy; I must confess to having one for The Master and Margharita. Occasionally I got caught up in the narrative, and I really did like the fantastic "ball of the damned", but for the most part I found reading it a chore. YMMV, as they say...

On a happier note, I was so impressed with Jeffrey Ford's story in Album Zutique #1 (my first exposure to his writing) that I have just bought his short fiction collection & will be reading that soon.
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Mastadge
Posted on Saturday, May 24, 2003 - 11:47 am:   

I'll have to update my list one of these days. It's grown quite a bit. . .
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GabrielM
Posted on Saturday, May 24, 2003 - 09:06 pm:   

I usually very much enjoy Ligotti, but I found SIDESHOW utterly baffling.

I'm about to finish Cardin's book, which is rather derivative of Ligotti, but still a good read.
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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, September 01, 2003 - 04:43 pm:   

Hmm. . .my last list ended just as school was letting out, so here's my over-the-summer list up to the beginning of this new school year:

Louisiana Breakdown, by Lucius Shepard
Declare, by Tim Powers
Seven Touches of Music, by Zoran Živkoviæ
Time-Gifts, by Zoran Živkoviæ
The Etched City, by K.J. Bishop
The Divine Comedy (Lucifer, Book 4), by Mike Carey et al.
Black Walls, Red Glass, by Jeffrey Thomas
Veniss Underground, by Jeff VanderMeer
Monstrocity, by Jeffrey Thomas
Terror Incognita, by Jeffrey Thomas
T2: Rising Storm, by S.M. Stirling
Shatterpoint (Star Wars), by Matthew Woodring Stover
Night Moves and Other Stories, by Tim Powers
Fables & Reflections (The Sandman, Volume Six), by Neil Gaiman et al.
Worlds’ End (The Sandman, Volume Eight), by Neil Gaiman et al.
The Kindly Ones (The Sandman, Volume Nine), by Neil Gaiman et al.
The Wake (The Sandman, Volume Ten), by Neil Gaiman et al.
All Hell’s A-Coming (Preacher, Book Eight), by Garth Ennis et al.
Alamo (Preacher, Book Nine), by Garth Ennis et al.
Aaaiiieee!!!, by Jeffrey Thomas
The Facts of Life, by Graham Joyce
Force Heretic II: Refugee (Star Wars: The New Jedi Order), by Sean Williams & Shane Dix
Crossfire (Star Wars: Boba Fett #2), by Terry Bisson
Maze of Deception (Star Wars: Boba Fett #3), by Elizabeth Hand
Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Anima, by Elizabeth Hand & Paul Witcover et al.
Godhead Dying Downwards, by Jeffrey Thomas
Snow Crash, by Neil Stephenson
Cobwebs and Whispers, by Scott Thomas
Force Heretic III: Reunion (Star Wars: The New Jedi Order), by Sean Williams & Shane Dix
Prince of Annwn (The First Thread of The Mabinogion), by Evangeline Walton
The Children of Llyr (The Second Thread of The Mabinogion), by Evangeline Walton
Rawhead & Bloody Bones and Elusive Plato, by Rhys Hughes
Punktown, by Jeffrey Thomas
The Boats of the “Glen Carrig” and Other Nautical Adventures (The Collected Fiction of William Hope Hodgson, Volume 1), by William Hope Hodgson
The Hiding Place, by Corrie ten Boom with John and Elizabeth Sherrill
The Jaguar Hunter, by Lucius Shepard
The Scalehunter’s Beautiful Daughter, by Lucius Shepard
The Father of Stones, by Lucius Shepard
Life in Fife, by Jane Haden Waits
Vermillion, by Lucius Shepard, et al.
The Iliad, by Homer, translated by W.H.D. Rouse
The Odyssey, by Homer, translated by W.H.D. Rouse
Tanakh
The New Testament
Letters From Hades, by Jeffrey Thomas
Carrion Comfort, by Dan Simmons
Peace, by Gene Wolfe
VAS: An Opera in Flatland, by Steve Tomasula
The Mount, by Carol Emshwiller
The Divinity Student, by Michael Cisco
Inherit the Wind, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee
Theogony, by Hesiod
Works and Days, by Hesiod
Metamorphosis, by Ovid
Antigone, by Sophocles
Georgics, by Virgil
The Aeneid, by Virgil
Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom, by Cory Doctorow
The Anvil of the World, by Kage Baker
Phases of Gravity, by Dan Simmons
Sword Woman, by Robert E. Howard
The Translator, by John Crowley
Darwin’s Blade, by Dan Simmons
Nine Layers of Sky, by Liz Williams
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ben peek
Posted on Monday, September 01, 2003 - 07:31 pm:   

that's a lot of reading, but i see:

"Alamo (Preacher, Book Nine), by Garth Ennis et al."

anyhow i don't know how you've been feeling about PREACHER, but before it hit this last collection, i was feeling pretty let down with it. there were some okay moments in WAR IN THE SUN, and, but since the end of PROUD AMERICANS, i thought it had taken a serious dive.

however, ALAMO is a fine ending. on equal to the strongest part of the series, i believe.

ben.
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Jeffrey
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 11:20 am:   

Here is my final, complete list of the books I read in 2003 - I wish I had Mastadge's power of consumption, or even half that! - the titles appearing in the order they were read:

THE BUTTERFLY ARTIST, Forrest Aguirre
BURN, Jonathan Lyons
THE PEARL, John Steinbeck
THESE I KNOW BY HEART, Brian A. Hopkins
MEAN SHEEP, Tom Piccirilli
WORD MADE FLESH, Jack O'Connell
THE GOSSAMER EYE, Mark McLaughlin, Rain Graves, David Niall Wilson
CHRISTMAS TREES AND MONKEYS, Daniel G. Keohane
THIRST FOR LOVE, Yukio Mishima
THE TAIN, China Mieville
THE BRAINS OF RATS, Michael Blumlein
EVERVILLE, Clive Barker
CITIES OF THE RED NIGHT, William S. Burroughs
HAUNTER, Charlee Jacob
SESQUA VALLEY AND OTHER HAUNTS, W. H. Pugmire
AMERICAN PSYCHO, Brett Easton Ellis
BREAKING WINDOWS, edited by Luis Rodriguez
DEAD CATS BOUNCING, various
WATCHMEN, Alan Moore (graphic novel)
CONCRETE ISLAND, J. G. Ballard
MY WORK IS NOT YET DONE, Thomas Ligotti
OCTOBERLAND, various
THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME, Mark Haddon
IN SPRINGDALE TOWN, Robert Freeman Wexler

24; only 2 a month, on average. I hang my head in shame...

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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 02:55 pm:   

My final list (omitting comics, graphic novels and magazines):

NON-FICTION
-----------
You Are Being Lied To / Essay collection
The Greatest Stories Never Told / Rick Beyer
Adventures in Unhistory / by Avram Davidson
Coasts of Illusion / Clark Firestone
Phantom Islands of the Atlantic / Donald Johnson
Forgotten English / Jeffrey Kacirk
Lies Across America / James Loewen
Tea Dance at Savoy / Robert Meadley
No Longer on the Map / Raymond Ramsey
An Underground Education / Richard Zacks
Pirate Hunter: The True Story of Captain Kidd / Richard Zacks

OTHER (poetry, religious, blendings of fiction/non-fiction/poetry/etc.)
-----
Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 16 / Edited by Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling
The Rubaiyat of Omar Kayyam
Flowers of Evil / Charles Baudelaire
A Universal History of Infamy / Jorge Luis Borges
Book of Imaginary Beings / Jorge Luis Borges
The New Sins / David Byrne
The Decadent Cookbook / Medlar Lucan, Durian Gray
Flesh Eater's Cookbook / David Madsen
Breaking Windows / Edited by Luis Rodrigues
The Day Dali Died / Jeff VanderMeer


FICTION
-------
1000 Nights and a Night / Complete 4 Volume Mardrus & Mathers translation
Album Zutique #1 / Edited by Jeff VanderMeer
Dedalus Book of Polish Fantasy / Edited by Wiesiek Powaga
Leviathan #2 / Edited by Jeff VanderMeer & Rose Seacrest
The Thackery T Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric and Discredited Diseases / Edited by Jeff VanderMeer & Mark Roberts
Trampoline / Edited by Kelly Link
Butterfly Artist / Forrest Aguirre
The Wasp Factory / Iain Banks
The Etched City / KJ Bishop
The Divinity Student / Michael Cisco (re-reading)
The Tyrant / Michael Cisco
A Year in the Linear City / Paul Di Filippo
Strange Trades / Paul Di Filippo
The Lost World / by Arthur Conan Doyle
Once Were Warriors / Alan Duff
The Fantasy Writer's Assistant and Other Stories / Jeffrey Ford
Coraline / Neil Gaiman
Kalpa Imperial / Angelica Gorodischer
The Dark Domain / Stephan Grabinski
Bibliomancy / Elizabeth Hand
Viriconium / M. John Harrison
Boats of the Glen Carrig an Other Nautical Tales / William Hope Hodgson
Stories From a Lost Anthology / Rhys Hughes
Nowhere Near Milkwood / Rhys Hughes
La-Bas / J. K. Huysmans
The Melancholy of Anatomy / Shelley Jackson
The Book of Amuwapi / Christopher Lord
Strange Forces / Leopoldo Lugones
The Other Side / Alfred Kubin
Maldoror / Comte De Lautreamont
Black Sunlight / Dambudzo Marechera
The Tain / China Mieville
The Final Program / Michael Moorcock
The Manuscript Found in Saragossa / Jan Potocki
Malpertuis / Jean Ray
Will the Last Person to Leave the Planet Please Shut Off the Sun? / Mike Resnick
Other Cities / Benjamin Rosenbaum
Street of Crocodiles / Bruno Schulz
Jaguar Hunter / Lucius Shepard
Rendezvous at Averoigne / Clark Ashton Smith
Vas / Steve Tomasula
In & Oz / Steve Tomasula
Letters From Hades / Jeffrey Thomas
City of Saints & Madmen / Jeff VanderMeer (re-reading)
Veniss Underground / Jeff VanderMeer
All Too Surreal / Tim Waggoner
Jacob Von Gunten / Robert Walser
Quin's Shangai Circus / Edward Whittemore
Sinai Tapestry / Edward Whittemore
Jerusalem Poker / Edward Whittemore
Nile Shadows / Edward Whittemore
Jericho Mosaic / Edward Whittemore
Seven Touches of Music / Zoran Zivkovic
Impossible Encounters / Zoran Zivkovic


That comes out to 75 books, or just about 2 books a week.
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Robert
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 03:05 pm:   

Oops, make that 1.4 books a week.
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John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 08:58 am:   

Here is my finalized list, in no particular order. This does not include any periodical/zine type thing I read, of which there were a few. I had to remove two books from my earlier postings since I never got them finished.

PERFUME by Patrick Susskind
VENISS UNDERGROUND by Jeff VanderMeer
THE ALIENIST by Caleb Carr
THE FOURTH CIRCLE by Zoran Zivkovic
PUNKTOWN by Jeffrey Thomas
THE PHYSIOGNOMY by Jeffrey Ford
MEMORANDA by Jeffrey Ford
THE BEYOND by Jeffrey Ford
THE ETCHED CITY by KJ Bishop
WYRMHOLE by Jay Caselberg
THE SCAR by China Mieville
HOW TO BE A VILLIAN by Neil Zawacki
HOMINIDS by Robert Sawyer
THE KILN PEOPLE by David Brin
THE IMPOSSIBLE BIRD by Patrick O'Leaery
THE GIFT by Patrick O'Leary
QUIN'S SHANGHAI CIRCUS by Edward Whittemore
THE DIVINITY STUDENT by Michael Cisco
REPORT TO THE MEN'S CLUB by Carol Emshwiller
THE MOUNT by Carol Emshwiller
STRANGER THINGS HAPPEN by Kelly Link
MEET ME IN THE MOON ROOM by Ray Vukevich
THE SKY ROAD by Ken MacLeod
BRIDGET JONES' DIARY by Helen Fielding
IN SPRINGDALE TOWN by Robert Freeman Wexler

I think that's 25 or 26 books (too lazy to count again) which is about 2 a month like our gracious host here. I had hoped for better, but between work, zine, editing, home, the time for reading is sparse. I need to get back on track with reading on the train and not sleeping!

I'm currently finishing Ken MacLeod THE STAR FRACTION (one of the books I removed from my earlier list) and am not sure what to do next. I may take up CRYPTONOMICON or THE SILVER AGE, but my wife keeps telling me to read Gregory Maguire.

JK
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Jeffrey
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 04:08 pm:   

Impressive lists! Always fascinating...

It's interesting to see the same books appear on various lists, along with books that I've long meant to read.

Thanks for sharing!
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Paul Tremblay
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 06:40 pm:   

Fun topic...here's a partial (meaning, what I can remember reading in 2003)

Non-fic:

The Cirus Fire: Stewart O'nan
Seabiscuit: Laura Hillenbrand

Fic:

House of Leaves: Mark Danielewski
The Night Country: O'Nan
The Speed Queen: O'Nan
Prayer for the Dying: O'Nan
In the Walled City: O'Nan
Invisible Monsters: Chuck Palahniuk
Diary: Chuck Palahniuk
3000 MPH in Every Direction: Nick Mamatas
Abarat: Clive Barker
Pastoralia: George Saunders
Civilwarland in Bad Decline: George Saunders
A Confederacy of Dunces: O'Toole
Monstrocity: JET
Letters from Hades: JET
The Value of X: Poppy Z Brite
Veniss Underground: Jeff Vandermeer
City of Saints...: Jeff Vandermeer
lost girl lost boy: Peter Straub
The Curious Incident of the Dog and the Nigh-Time: Mark Haddon
Christmas Trees and Monkeys: Dan Keohane
Harry Potter and the order of the Phoenix: JK Rowling
Wolves of the Calla: Steven King
Book of Final Flesh: ed. James Lowder
Tumbling Home: Amy Hempel
IO: Simon Logan
Word Made Flesh: Jack O'Connell
Slaughter-House Five: Vonnegut
Breakfast of Champions: Vonnegut
Cat's Cradle: Vonnegut
Mother Night: Vonnegut
Cursed be the Child: Mort Castle
Coraline: Neil Gaiman
In the Lake of the Woods: Tim O'brien
The Little Friend: Donna Tartt

that's all I remember.
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JET
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2004 - 12:26 am:   

That's a great list, Paul! I'm pleased you sought out a couple of the books I recommended to you. I sought out some other authors' recommendations during the year, myself, such as CONCRETE ISLAND by J. G. Ballard. Jeff VanderMeer recommended BRAINS OF RATS and IN SPRINGDALE TOWN, my friend Tom Hughes has long been after me to read CITIES OF THE RED NIGHT, and Earthling Publications' Paul Miller bought me WATCHMEN as a gift. :-)
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Neddal
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 05:27 pm:   

Fiction...off the top of my head:
Word Made Flesh - Jack O' Connell
Box Nine - "" ""
Wireless - "" ""
Skin Palace - "" ""
The Physiognmy - Jeff Ford
The Beyond - "" ""
The Black Dahlia - James Ellroy
Pain Management - Andrew Vachss
A Burnt Out Case - Graham Greene
Dune - Frank Herbert
Dune Messiah - "" ""
Children of Dune - """"
A Storm of Swords - George R.R. Martin
Swords & Deviltry - Fritz Leiber
Ill Met in Lankhmar - "" ""
City of Saints and Madmen - Jeff Vandermeer
The Scar - Chine Mieville
Perdido Street Station - "" ""
House of Leaves - Mark Z. Danielewski
Survivor - Chuck Palahniuk
Album Zutique #1 - Jeff Vandermeer, ed.
Shadows Over Innsmouth - Stephen Jones, Ed.
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Jeffrey
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 02:56 pm:   

Some favorites of mine in there. May I ask how you heard about WORD MADE FLESH and the other O'Connell books (I enjoyed BOX NINE but not nearly so much as I did WORD)? I bought WORD some time ago; O'Connell lives close by, here in Massachusetts, but ironically I never bought the book until I finally saw it in Maine. When I read it I was bowled over, and have been recommending it to everyone who would listen. Sadly, I don't see it in area book shops these days, or any of O'Connell's work for that matter; so much for local support.
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Bill B.
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 09:33 am:   

I rounded out the year with:

Jackson, Shirley: The Haunting of Hill House
Weighell, Ron: The White Road
Ackroyd, Peter: Hawksmoor
Myers, Amy (ed.): After Midnight Stories
Thomas, Jeffrey: Godhead Dying Downwards
Alan, A.J.: Good Evening, Everyone!
Warner, Matthew: The Organ Donor
Samuels, Mark: The White Hands and Other Weird Tales
Angerhuber, Eddie M.: Nocturnal Products
Richardson, Maurice: The Exploits of Engelbrecht
Oliver, Reggie: The Dreams of Cardinal Vittorini and Other Strange Stories
Nathan, Robert: Portrait of Jennie
Lansdale, Joe R.: Writer of the Purple Rage
Maguire, Gregory: Lost
Osier, Jeffrey: Driftglider and Other Stories
Kersh, Gerald: Nightshade and Damnations, On An Odd Note
McLaughlin, Mark: The Spiderweb Tree
Ford, Jeffrey: The Fantasy Writer’s Assistant
Sarban: Ringstones and Other Curious Tales
VanderMeer, Jeff: City of Saints and Madmen
Sutton, David A. (ed.): The Satyr’s Head and Other Tales of Terror
Samuels, Mark: Black Altars
Valentine, Mark: Masques and Citadels: More Tales of the Connoisseur
Wexler, Robert Freeman: In Springdale Town
Hirshberg, Glen: The Two Sams
Black, Holly and Tony DiTerlizzi: The Spiderwick Chronicles Book 1: The Field Guide,
The Spiderwick Chronicles Book 2: The Seeing Stone
Bellairs, John: The House With a Clock In Its Walls
White, Jon Manchip: Whistling Through the Churchyard: Strange Tales from a Superstitious Welshman
Leiber, Fritz: The Black Gondolier and Other Stories
Rowlands, David: They Might Be Ghosts: Ghost Stories of an Artisan
Aguirre, Forrest: The Butterfly Artist

My favorite is the Mark Valentine book, the hyperaesthetic Connoisseur is one of the great weird fiction characters of all time. I was disappointed in the Fritz Leiber volume; the title story is excellent, as is "The Dreams of Albert Moreland", but that's available elsewhere, and I was left cold by most of the rest, particularly "Game for Motel Room". I also didn't much care for LOST; I didn't like any of the characters, or the writing style, so while there was a good story underneath I didn't have much fun getting to it. Happily, I enjoyed everything else I read. Now I'll review everyone else's lists again to get ideas for 2004.
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Neddal
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 09:39 am:   

Jeffrey: I tracked WORD MADE FLESH down after reading this interview w/O'Connell on disinfo.com: <http://www.disinfo.com/archive/pages/article/id749/pg1/index.html>

I lucked out in that my local library branch has copies WMF and Box Nine. I've since bought a copy of WMF for myself. I loved WORD..., I like Box Nine a lot too, but it didn't hit me as hard.

WIRELESS and SLIN PALACE I kind of fluked into. Have you read them?

Heh. Since I read WORD... I've been raving about to anyone who will listen as well.

I've not read Punktown (is high on my to read/get list), but I saw on your page that originally it was loosly based on Worcester as well? Is it really that bad down there? As part of our cable service we get the Boston NBC and ABC affiliates (I'm in NF, Canada). The news out of Boston is pretty brutal, almost as bad as the news out of Detroit (we get Detroit affiliates too.) I find it hard to believe that Worcester could be any worse

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John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 10:52 am:   

Sheesh, I totally forgot the first two Spiderwick books and HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX for my list. Slipping, slipping.

JK
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Jeffrey
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2004 - 01:41 pm:   

I wouldn't say Worcester is worse than Boston (crime-wise) but it is very scummy. Bleak, gray, depressing; you can drive through sections where every pedestrian you see looks like some zombie out of a Romero movie - brain barely sparking but teeth ready to tear into you. But a lot of friends, and my girlfriend, live there...and it has some nice museums, bookstores, restaurants, etc. After all, Punktown has its attractions, as well. ;) Both O'Connell and I have taken our actual apprehensions and run with them into the realm of caricature (all in the service of fiction, you understand). Though maybe we're envisioning Worcester a decade, or a century, from now.
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Neddal
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - 03:44 am:   

It sounds a bit like Hamilton, Ontario or Buffalo, N.Y. You can see clouds of grit over Hamilton as you're driving by.

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