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Jay C
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 12:54 pm:   

And for continuity's sake, herein find Klima's last post.

Oh, almost bought a bottle of PIKE's ($19.99) that was a blend of three grapes: grenache, shiraz, and merlot. Recommend?

JK

Hmm, haven't heard of it, but it's a good mix.

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Jay C
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 12:59 pm:   

Pikes Shiraz Grenache Mourverdre 1999, Clare Valley Winemaker Neil Pike has shown he is one of the district's most innovative and experimental thinkers. His SGM (55% shiraz, 32% grenache and 13% mourvedre), not a typical blend for the region, comes from fruit grown in the subregions of Sevenhill and Polish Hill. Richly flavoured with hints of red berries and warm earth, it finishes with some tight savoury tannins, there are some appealing gamy characters, which are also apparent in the straight shiraz. This wine should be even more inviting in five year's time.
Australia's Top 30 reds under $25
- Ken Gargett - Wine Magazine - June/July 2001

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Laura Anne
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 01:06 pm:   

As long as we're giving recomendations...

Had another offering from Grant Burges on Friday (they who make the earlier-discussed Holy Trinity). Shiraz Barossa Miamba 1999.

"Dark and dense, but not especially weighty, this has almost a refreshing sense of balance to its rush of cherry, raspberry and exotic spice flavors, which echo nicely on the firm, slightly hot finish. Best from 2004 through 2010." (wine Spectator, 9/30/02)

WS gave it an 88, which I agree with. More boysenberry than raspberry, but definite warm spice. Considering it retails for about $15 -- very nice!
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 01:17 pm:   

Haven't found Grant Burges, but I've been very lazy about locating it. Only looked two places. And I didn't ask any of the staff people at either place. We have a place called Joe Canal's down in Princeton that is very big and has a lot of different things in stock. Haven't stopped there yet to look around, and I need to get off my ass and ask someone. The Pike is what I was looking at, I couldn't exactly remember the mix in my previous post.

Picked up a Korbel Brut that WS gave an 85. The wifet's on antibiotics so we didn't dig into it yet. We need some friends to drop by so we get motivated to pop open a bottle. Minz is noly about 10 minutes away from us, but he's been so damn busy...

JK
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Laura Anne
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2003 - 03:54 am:   

This is Jay, taking the liberty of reposting Laura Anne's post from the new opening hours thread to here.

So, went to Grace tonight with an west coast agent who is my single malt drinking buddy when she's in town (1 part business, 2 parts gossip, 5 parts serious boozing). Damn. Never was there on a Thursday before. Place was more than moderately hopping by 6:00!

Some day I'm actually going to have to have dinner there, see if the food's as good as the bar. I'm seriously in love with the bartenders there. One surfer dude, one heavyset Rasta type. Savvy guys, and always nice to get props from the barstaff on your drink selection. *beam*


So, UK contingent, next time you're over, we have a date? Since Klima apparently won't bestir himself to come downtown?
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John Klima
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2003 - 05:45 am:   

Harumph.
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Liz W
Posted on Saturday, May 10, 2003 - 02:03 pm:   

I have missed most of this thread due to lotus-eating on a small Greek island, but am now back and will throw my drinking weight behind Laura Anne on the malts issue. I am a particular fan of Laphroig, but Lagavulin is also excellent - anything Islay that tastes as though it has been dredged from the bottom of a peat bog is good with me. But I also like Glenfiddich.

Absinthe: damn nearly killed me in Barcelona once. (The last time I drank it was in the same bar - George Orwell's old boozer, the Marsella, back in the winter. We went as a kind of extended wake for my late partner, whose fave bar it was. ) It's hardcore stuff and I am not very into anything aniseedy, like raki or (?) pastis.

Liz


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John Klima
Posted on Sunday, May 11, 2003 - 09:55 am:   

My problem with going downtown, or going out in New York in general, is that there is no such thing as going out for one drink. Every time I've gone out in the city after work I get home after midnight. This is not something I like to do during the week. (although I am going to see Cremaster next Tuesday, so I will do it) I just happen to like my wife better than anyone else I'd know and I'll pick spending time with her over anything else ten times out of ten.

Besides, why can't you bums drag yourself uptown? ;^) Seriously though, when do we want to get together? Spontaneous and my schedule don't mix real well.

JK
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Laura Anne
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2003 - 07:08 pm:   


*Looks at PDA's datebook, sighs.* How does early August sound? I swear, I don't think of myself as a social butterfly, but May June and July just got away from me...

(well, part of that's cause we're going to Italy for two weeks. *happy meerkat dance* So far in my life I've only been in three non-NJ places I could move to and live happily ever after, and two of them were in Italy.)
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2003 - 11:10 am:   

What do you recommend for a headache and a desire to rip out the throat of every person you come in contact with scream at people's stupidity?

JK
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Jay C
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2003 - 11:38 am:   

Hmmm, a headache, codeine. A desire to...the Nike commercial. Just do it.

You can drink aftwerwards.
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2003 - 12:01 pm:   

Cigarettes: 0 (very good); Alcohol Units: 0 (not good); Caffeinated Beverages: 1; Calories: Umm, lots?

Feeling better. Took liquid codeine (aka Coca-Cola) and it cleared my head right up. Am thinking maybe that might not be a good thing. Might be addicted to soda, don't know what Mum will think of that.

Solved stupid people thing by avoiding stupid people.

John "Bridget" Klima
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Laura Anne
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2003 - 04:06 pm:   

Kill 'em. Kill 'em all. Then come kill my Stupid People<tm> for me, too.

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John Klima
Posted on Saturday, May 17, 2003 - 04:57 pm:   

I found the cure for stupid people. I went shopping. Surprisingly, I bought four pairs of pants, two shirts, and a pair of really cool shoes. My wife got three pairs...now is that fair? Never saw myself as the shopping type, but I'm so tired right now that I couldn't care less. Bought some Limoncello to make Nigella Lawson Lemon Drops later. My wife said she wanted to make drinks tonight. Bought some new glasses for the bar. Note to self, get bigger bar for collection of glasses...

JK
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John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 - 07:05 am:   

The wife and I made Greek food last night (grilled lamb tenderloin, tziziki, watermelon mint salad, grilled pitas, etc.) and decided to open the bottle of Viognier. Very crisp, very clear. It was a nice compliment to such a herby, complex meal. Reminiscent of Riesling, almost, but not as sweet.

JK
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Laura Anne
Posted on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 - 07:30 am:   

"Reminiscent of Riesling, almost, but not as sweet."


Yep, which is probably why I like it so much. Honeysuckle aroma and spring rain taste.

I've read somewhere about a red grape (can't remember which) being grafted onto Viognier stock, creating a very interesting floral-spice cross. Need to go back and find the reference, because it piqued my interest (and my taste buds).

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Jay C
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 06:18 am:   

Although, as you know, I am not a white wine drinker, the concept sounds quite tempting -- the grafted stock, I mean.
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 06:22 am:   

Does your problem with white wine extend to champagne as well, or is that not made in the same way?

JK
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Jay C
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 10:59 am:   

No, not made the same way. Nor, thank the powers, is Sauternes.

Love a good champagne. My favourites are Dom, Crystal and Reoderer. Though I'm quite partial to a Pol Roger now and again. If I'm struggling, a nice Piper red label is passable. Helps that that's what they tend to serve on British Airway. I do, however, loathe and despise Lanson.
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Laura Anne
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 02:56 pm:   

Can't find the article on that grafting. Bother. See, this is what happens when you clean the office and *gasp* throw things away...

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Laura Anne
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 05:45 am:   


So, thinking only of the folk here (no, really. it was all research) we found a place in midtown that claims to have NYC's largest selection of single malts. What I saw was pretty impressive. _And_ they have Strongbow on tap.

And the food's not bad, either. Assuming you ignore the haggis that's apparently also available. But they're Scottish, so we'll forgive them. And the bartenders wear kilts, if that does it for you.

St. Andrew's Pub
West 44th, off 6th.

Bar's open until 4am. :-)

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Jay C
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 08:45 am:   

Hrmmm, sadly it may be a while before I sample the wares.
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Liz Williams
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 09:03 am:   

Better than Brighton, mutter mutter - yesterday the folks from Locus showed up and we took them to an 'organic' pub (whatever that means). Nice selection of wine, decent selection of beer, but when I ordered a whisky the barman looked down his nose and said "We don't serve THAT sort of thing here."

Scuse me? They are a pub, are they not? I asked why and got no satisfactory answer. But shall not be going back in a hurry.
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Liz Williams
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 09:05 am:   

BTW, what's wrong with haggis? So it's a sheep's stomach. Where's the problem??

Kilts, though - no, but a plaid worn properly can be eye catching.
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Laura Anne
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 11:42 am:   

Haggis, once a year, properly piped in and doused with single malt, is fine. But to order it on a regular basis... when you're _not_ starving... no thanks.

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Liz Williams
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 12:19 pm:   

One would need to be a bit peckish, granted.

BTW I didn't say that - just in case Neil W decides to do the adamantine forehead butt thing again on behalf of the national honour.
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Neil
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 02:47 pm:   

Not at all, we all have our own tastes after all, but if you haven't had a haggis supper (ie deep fried in batter and served with chips), you're definitely missing out!
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Liz 'kiltless' Williams
Posted on Monday, June 02, 2003 - 01:17 am:   

I have had a haggis supper. Also deep-fried black pudding in a car park near Killin, which was great even though it sounds like the last thing one would want to ingest.

Nae the deep-fried pizza, though. A culinary step too far.

(Occurs to me that Jay needs to sort out some bar snacks pronto, if this is the kind of thing we're going to be munching on in here...)
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, June 02, 2003 - 07:12 am:   

St. Andrews is around the corner from where I work. When are we going?

JK
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Jay C
Posted on Monday, June 02, 2003 - 02:50 pm:   

Okay, this is definitely improper discussion for this thread. Strange foods do not belong in the bar. Bar snacks yes, but strange foods no. Let us return to all topics around fine consumption practices.
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Liz Williams
Posted on Monday, June 02, 2003 - 04:13 pm:   

See, this is what happens when you leave a bar alone for more than 24 hours. You're just out the door, and the clientele start serving themselves, bringing in weird foodstuffs, having picnics, roaring for cake and the finest wines available to humanity...

You want to hire a cyber-barmaid, with one of those beehive hairdos and a cigarette permanently attached to her lip, to keep the place in order.

(Actually Milford was left in charge of the hotel bar when the workshop was based in Devon, for 5 years running, and did not abuse its collective privileges, at all. SF writers - perhaps not what they were...)
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Laura Anne
Posted on Monday, June 02, 2003 - 06:18 pm:   

"(Actually Milford was left in charge of the hotel bar when the workshop was based in Devon, for 5 years running, and did not abuse its collective privileges, at all. SF writers - perhaps not what they were...)"

You clearly didn't have any editors there with you. They would have set things to rights. :-D The best drinking I ever saw as at the Southwest Writers Conference in Albuquerque. After all the Romance people had gone to bed, the SF and Western editors sat in the bar and entertained the bartender until he finally threw us out -- handing over the last of the tequila for us to finish off outside on the stoop. Ah, those were the days...

And yes, I was awake at 8 the next morning for my breakfast appointment. I was _much_ younger then.
I also now don't drink tequila.


So what _are_ the acceptable bar foods, anyway? At the very least we need an ever-refilling plate of nachos. With real cheese, none of that dayglo Velveeta crap.
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Liz Williams
Posted on Tuesday, June 03, 2003 - 12:30 am:   

>After all the Romance people had gone to bed, the SF and Western editors sat in the bar and entertained the bartender until he finally >threw us out

That is just a classic line. :-) Glad to see those Western editors live up to some kinda grand old saloon tradition...!

I don't have much stamina these days, alas. Though God knows it's not for lack of practice.

Absolutely no velveeta, but if we are going for cheese (which I hope we are), I should like to put in a word for cheese with unashamed bar-emptying properties: something like St Agur or Pont L'Eveque. Not those little tasteless cubes of ersatz cheddar.

It is a little too early in the day to get my head round bar snacks, but also decent olives, parma ham and anything in the French cold cut line. Tapas can be good, if judiciously chosen (but I am an anchovy fan). Sushi, why not?

And for British customers, a chippy next door, please. (InterZone actually meets in a pub which has a nationally-famous fish and chip shop next to it. This works well).



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John Klima
Posted on Friday, June 06, 2003 - 06:45 am:   

Made Watermelon freezy things last night using frozen chunks of watermelon instead of ice. Yes, from Nigella, my wife's leader these days.

12 2-inch chunks of frozen watermelon
1 heaping tablespoon of conf. sugar
juice of 1 lime
1/3 cup of rum

throw in blender and blitz to high heaven. makes two drinks. not too sweet, not too strong (they taste very rummy to begin with and mellow quickly as the concoction warms up [or maybe it was as I warmed up])
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Jay C
Posted on Friday, June 06, 2003 - 12:53 pm:   

Fwoah. Nigella. Nigella drinks. Hmmmmmmmm.
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Laura Anne
Posted on Friday, June 06, 2003 - 02:50 pm:   

*sigh* Tis the season for warm weather drinks, and we have no guavaberry liquor -- I need to go back to Sint Maartin's. Well, need to go back anyway, but especially for a guavaberry frost...

Damn. Now I'm nostalgic _and_ thirsty!



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Laura Anne
Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - 08:12 pm:   

two wine recs:

Reichsgraf von Kessekstatt riesling spatlese 2001. Spelling approximate. *grin* As Jay will attest, I'm not a big fan of rieslings. But whoa.... my notes: An initial overwhelming mouth of honey and peach is followed up by the emergency of ripe apricot and slate, with a vanilla follow-through. Managed to hold its own against chinese food (beef with string beans and General Tsao's chicken), becoming less intense but allowing more delicate mineral flavors to come through. Wine Spectator gave it a 90. I agree. $21.

Charles Krug Reserve Generations Meritage 1998. A rough-edged berry and spice nose that is mirrored on the taste. Smooths out only a bit as it opens -- this could age a while longer yet. A hint of something just slightly gentler than tobacco mingling with the fruit. Almost a hint of pepermint in the finish, which intrigues. Cab Sauv, merlot and cab franc blend harmonously. For $25, an excellent wine, and will possibly get better with another year to age. (Krug is owned by Mondavi)
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Laura Anne
Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - 08:13 pm:   

*sigh* "emergence," not "emergency."
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Liz Williams
Posted on Thursday, June 19, 2003 - 12:23 am:   

Oh, I dunno. I rather like the idea of an apricot emergency. Like red alert, but camper.
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, June 23, 2003 - 10:44 am:   

We had our annual end-of-the-school-year party this last weekend. This year's theme was Mexican. While we never got to Margeritas, we did imbibe well. Much beer was drunk, as well as red sangria. But the highlight of the drinking night was William Smith and I decided to drink ROY G BIV. So, I think we succeeded, but as I recap I'll see how well we really did.

R:== Cosmos, I know, not really red, but it's close
O:==
Y:== home-made idea with Galliano, orange vodka, and white soda...it was awful
G:== Grasshopper
B:== Swimming Pool: blue curacao, vodka, and Rose's lime juice...topped off with Swedish Fish
I:== White Russian (OK, it's not Indigo, but we drank it and there's no BROWN in the rainbow)
V:== home-made with cranberry, blue curacao, and cointreau...very yummy actually

We didn't do them in order, we started with 'B' and then jumped around. As I remember now, Will was drinking beer and the rainbow, so we never did orange, although that would have been easy. After I made my awful Galliano drink, my wife reminded me that we had Lemoncello and that would make a more tasty drink.

Oh well...

JK
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Laura Anne
Posted on Sunday, July 13, 2003 - 10:31 am:   

Home from Italia with a list of new favorites to try and find in the local wine store. Three notables:

Sangratino di Montefalco 1999, from Azienda Agricola Scacciadiavoli, in Umbria. We paid 22 euros for the bottle, which we're told was a very good example of the varietal, one we've never had before. Dark purple appearance, with a warm purple spice. Not an extraordinary wine, but quite complimentary to the Umbrian cuisine. I don't think you can get Sagrantino outside the area -- I've certainly never seen in in stores in the States!

Rosso Vigna Monticchio and the Rubesco (a reserve)95, from Lungarotti in Torgiano. The 'regular' was 6 euros in the tasting room, the reserva was 16 euros. Both were astonishing for the price -- black plum, very silky, with well-integrated tannins. We brought a bottle home to have with dinner, and it was even better. If you can get your hands on a bottle, try it. Once we left Torgiano we didn't see it in even the best-stocked enotecas. :-(

Camigliano's 1997 Brunello. Do the words "wow" and "oh, wow" mean anything to you? We tasted this in the enoteca in Montalcino, then saw it on the wine list when we had lunch and splurged (about 40 euros) on a bottle. Then we went back and bought three bottles to take home with us. A food wine, if ever there was one. It changed its skin with every course we ate, matching and contrasting flavors in an absolutely fascinating way. I think we paid about 32 euros for it in the enoteca.

Also did some tastings at Montalcino, but didn't find anything that knocked my socks off.

It's probably just as well we didn't go anywhere near the Piedmont area. I would have done painful damage to the Visa bill...

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Laura Anne
Posted on Sunday, July 13, 2003 - 10:33 am:   

Oh, and my sister and brother in law kept a bottle of limoncello in the freezer the entire two weeks we were there. Didn't do it for me, I'm afraid. And not quite the thing to dip contucci into, anyway.
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Jay C
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 04:11 am:   

They certainly sound like stirling finds. Mmmmm. And no, limoncello is not my cup of tea, so to speak. I am gradually learning the value of the Italian selection, though I will still run for Bordeaux or some of the big Aussies as a first preference.
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Laura Anne
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 07:33 am:   

*sigh* Some tastings in _Montepulciano_ that didn't knock socks off, that is. Damn these towns with their similar-sounding names. And me with jet lag as well...
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, August 04, 2003 - 11:51 am:   

So.....

Been shaking things up with Chambord around the house lately. Bought some Dooley's toffee liquer and made some Dooley's Floats last night. Also had a very nice bottle of champagne with bacon-wrapped scallops.

Bought a bottle of White Shiraz...is that just an upscale way of saying: White Zinfandel?

We have a newish liquor store in Princeton called Joe Canal's that increases the variety of their stock every few weeks. I'm also excited to announce that a Buy-Rite liquor is being opened within walking distance of my house.

The most drinking I ever did in my life was the year after I graduated from college. My best friend and I moved into an apartment across the street from a liquor store. We stumbled back and forth many a night. During this time I had the brilliant idea to drink our age in shots. We were 24 and somehow made it to 25 and beyond.

JK
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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Monday, August 04, 2003 - 03:30 pm:   

Ouch. Tonight I had visitors from Spain. I embarked upon blind whiskey tastings. The one that of course stumped everyone was the single barrel American brewed in a limited edition in Scotland. (A gratefully accepted gift from Darren Nash at Earthlight, while there still was an Earthlight. Fair payback for getting him the limited edition and personalised Wolfe hardback, we all agreed.) Falling back on the Stravechio after that one was like music to the mouth, sweet, a touch of smoke, a hint of herbs but rich, full and amber.
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Laura Anne
Posted on Sunday, August 10, 2003 - 08:19 am:   

*sneaks in and turns the virtual a/c waaaaay the hell up, in hopes of reviving the bodies laying about in various stages of melt*
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Liz Williams
Posted on Sunday, August 10, 2003 - 08:29 am:   

*whew* - that's better. Thanks. One moment while I peel myself from my chair...

Only been away for 2 weeks and they fiddle with the weather controls in my absence. Typical. As with cats, I shall blame the nearest person for the weather - in this case, Jay.

So - trip saw lots of vodka (a bottle of which began to leak in someone's suitcase when we were on the plane, causing a steady drip from the overhead hatch. A bloke sitting nearby looked up wistfully and said "You realise this is a Russian dream?").

One of the vodkas that you could buy had a label on it that said in English "Now Hangover Free!" Probably means it contained water...I did not see the range that you can get in Poland, but did not try very hard, admittedly.

Someone purchased a bottle of Armenian cognac, which was excellent. Years ago we got a bottle of Uzbek brandy, which was breached with some trepidation, and found the same thing. Very smooth. But Russian wine is usually dreadful, to my mind.



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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Sunday, August 10, 2003 - 08:39 am:   

To your body too, I would imagine. Laughing on the Russian Dream thing.

Oh, and Laura Anne, thanks for the a/c...we need it. Perhaps you could teach the Brits how it works.
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Guess who . . .
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 01:02 pm:   

Uh, is this thing on?

I'm not sure how the finest Britaussie I ever met managed to hide this booze shack for so long, but ladies and gen'lemen, lock up the booze and hide the ammunition, 'cause I've got a hankerin' for sum'in that can drop a lesser man in ten seconds flat.

If it ain't permanent liver damage, it ain't drinkin!

--we now return you to your regularly scheduled program . . .
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 01:47 pm:   

Hey Minz:

If you look back, you'll see that I started this mess ages ago, not the Turkish Sheik !

Pull up a glass, whattaya want? We have everything!

JK
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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 02:00 pm:   

We surely do. And now I'm the one attracting bad influences. Make it pink drinks all round, folks.
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Liz Williams
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 03:08 pm:   

My kitchen is a hell hole of alchemical transformation. And so, I have been sponging off close friends for dinner. During which, someone brought round a nice Cabernet Syrah, picked up in France.

(And now I also have a new vice. Wheeeee! It is: 'McChrystals Snuff.' Tobacco and menthol and you snort it like, well, other things. If you're into that kind of thing, of course. Time for a snuff revival! OK, shutting up right now.)
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Minz
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 04:56 pm:   

Oh dear Gawd. Snuff culture shock! Can't banish images of high school jocks snorting snuff in class. Must perform lobotomy . . . ahh, that's much better. (the snuff was better than the chewing tobacco; if you have to spit it out, it can't be that good. [Right, ladies?] Puking up peyote--at least there's a big enough upside to that . . . or so I've heard.)

John, I think I need about four fingers of The Balvenie 12-year-old Doublewood, and a nice glass of New Zealand Riesling; if only I could remember the dang vinyards. And why is this bloody icepick sitting on my desk? And where are my damn drinks???
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minz
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 04:59 pm:   

Oh, and a pint of Murphy's Stout on my friend, James (with a nod to his fine fellow debaucher).
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Dennis McCunney
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 09:04 pm:   

Minz:

>Oh dear Gawd. Snuff culture shock! Can't banish
>images of high school jocks snorting snuff in
>class.

Hmmm. Any snort in a storm?

>Puking up peyote--at least there's a big enough
>upside to that . . . or so I've heard.)

In a native american ceremony, vomiting is assumed to be purging evil spirits. They just matter-of-factly mop up the mess and you go on.

In a _non_ native american ceremony, vomiting means you didn't properly clean the buttons before ingesting.

And peyote buttons dried, ground, and smoked are an interesting experience.

Though I prefer mushrooms, where possible.
______
Dennis

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Liz Williams
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 12:58 am:   

Dear God, what have I started??

Ayahuasca seems to be taking off over here in a big way, and they have to give you a bucket for that, too. I dunno, I just can't see it as an ideal first date venue, somehow...
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minz
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 12:56 pm:   

I'm sorry, Liz, but I have to disagree. It's the perfect first date. If you still want to see each other after that first experience, you know you've found something (says the guy who's been with the same super-fine lady since July 28, 1989).
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Liz Williams
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 01:20 pm:   

Well, you may have a point. But call me old fashioned - I just don't think it's ladylike to puke into a bucket when you've only just met someone. (And the Brits don't really date - one can see why...)
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Liz Williams
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 01:23 pm:   

Occurs to me that the history of this thread is a bit like some hideous night out - it starts with civilised talk over fine wines, moves onto malt whisky, rapidly degenerates into weird food, and ends up with drugs and vomit. Nice! We'll all be flung out onto the street in a minute and serve us right...
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Laura Anne
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 02:33 pm:   

Hey, I'm over here in the corner with my latest wine review, just waiting for you folk to clean yourselves up and get back with the program...

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Liz Williams
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 02:39 pm:   

I think that's a very good idea. One moment while I hose down the decks....there.
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jim
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 03:01 pm:   

No PROGRAMS!
12-step this!
*as he daintily sips from his glass of lovely Chilean Savignon Blanc*
Ahem. I mean, indubitably.
What, pray tell, are you looking to share with us this evening, Fraulein Gilman?
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Laura Anne
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 05:18 pm:   

Opened a new bottle last night, something we picked up a while ago -- a chianti classico riserva 1995 from Poggio dei Poggio.

It's oh-so-ready to drink. A traditional sangiovese taste opened up into black cherry and oak. Tanins are still strong, but work well with the fruit for a really enjoyable mouth-ful. Structured as hell - a very firm wine, if that makes sense to you. And the finish just goes on and on. Had it with a chicken primavera stir fry, and it was a very good match.

MSRP was $17.99.

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