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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 11:09 am:   

   By MarcL on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 10:40 am:

I'll probably be watching Grimm with the kids, but my expectations couldn't be much lower. I prepared for it by watching Munchhausen last night. I was never that impressed by Munch--, it seemed so disjointed, but it held up pretty well, and there was more of a (rambling) plot than I remembered. The smart stylization choices helped keep the special effects from weathering; many other effect-heavy movies from the same period are starting to look rather awful.

Grimm looks like a lot of notes cribbed from the Baron.

You know, I was thinking about Matt Damon's English accent. Why English? Weren't the Brothers German? If they're going to give him a fake accent, why not the right one?
   By Lucius on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 10:51 am:

See how he butvhers an english accent, then imagine him doing a german accent...Auch du lieber, Hansie! Vhat is ziss Fuhrer business. Mit de Heil and the Himmler....
   By Minz on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 11:26 am:

Don't lay the blame at entirely at Gilliam's feet. He and the studio had a huge falling out about the direction of the film; I know, nothing new there for Terry, but still.

He ended up walking away even earlier than usual, and went off to direct Tideland, which looks to be much more promising. From imdb:
After her mother dies from a heroin overdose, Jeliza-Rose is taken from the big city to a rural farmhouse by her father. As she tries to settle into a new life in a house her father had purchased for his now-deceased mother, Jeliza-Rose's attempts to deal with what's happened result in increasingly odd behavior, as she begins to communicate mainly with her bodiless Barbie doll heads and Dell, a neighborhood woman who always wears a beekeeper's veil.
   By MarcL on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 11:41 am:

kellys, I found Memories of Murder to be extremely haunting. I can't remember all the details a few months after seeing it, but I haven't escaped the mood of the film, and I look forward to watching it again.

The trailer for Memory of Killer looks very good.

Need more Lars Von Trier!
   By Stephen on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 12:00 pm:

Marc, I liked Munchhausen, but I only saw it once when I was young. I remember it was long. I'd like to see it again sometime.

   By Stephen on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 12:02 pm:

Never heard of The Five Obstructions...
   By Dave G. on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 12:12 pm:

I haven't watched it yet, but my understanding is that he challenges a fellow filmmaker to remake one of his short films five times, each time with some onerous condition attached that should make it all but impossible. Sounds like a howl.
   By MCisco on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 12:14 pm:

I yanked the quote from an article on the front page of the Guardian website, but I can't seem to relocate it. Maybe in business??
   By Stephen on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 12:48 pm:

Sounds interesting, Dave, in terms of a film experiment. Lars is interesting as a director, totally independent, anti-hollywood and serious about his craft. Based on what I've seen, like Dancer and Dogville, he likes to tackle morality in a dark way, with a dark glimpse of humanity. But even though his movies are somewhat emotionally affecting, there's still something cold or detached about them... almost sadistic.
   By Stephen on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 12:53 pm:

I think Gilliam would be better off if he just said fuck you to hollywood -- I'm doing my own thing.
   By Dave G. on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 02:21 pm:

Doesn't Gilliam bring a lot of his problems on himself? In LOST IN LA MANCHA, that was the impression I got. I mean, how can you scout a location and not know that the air force conducts flyovers on it? I mean, duh...
   By Stephen on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 02:52 pm:

I think in the case of Lost in La Mancha, it was a combination of poor judgement and bad luck. Remember, the actor who was playing Quixote (who was great for the role) got sick. They were already over budget and weather became a factor, as well.
   By Laird on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 10:04 am:

The Virgin Spring & Old Boy.

VS is fabulous on the whole. I'm ambivalent regarding the conclusion, however.

Old Boy. Well. That was a remarkable film. The actor made all the difference for me.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 11:13 am:   

The star of OLD BOY has a new movie called CRYING FIST. I'd also recommend his previous film by the director or Old Boy, SYMPATHY FOR MR VENGEANCE.
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Laird
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 11:24 am:   

Thanks, Lucius. I'll look for them.
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Rich Patterson
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 01:12 pm:   

Just catching up after a couple weeks without internet. I see you didn’t like SKELETON KEY because it didn’t get the south right. Being a northerner, I thought it looked pretty authentic. What parts were most wrong? I wouldn’t say it was a great movie by any stretch, but I liked it better than CREEP or DESCENT, which I saw around the same time. One part that bugged me was when Hudson went into John Hurt’s room to discover him listening to 78s on a record changer. Can’t be a real convenient hi-fi set-up for a paralyzed guy. Presumably, this was just a way to get Robert Johnson into the film - whose deal with the devil has become a cliché. I agree that Stellan Skaargard and Gena Rowlands were both terrific.
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kellys
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 02:45 pm:   

Anyone else find Old Boy to be a bit too melodramatic, too absurd in its plot, to be remarkable? It's certainly a good film, but the over-the-top style, which was impressive, kept me at a distance emotionally from the characters. Though the first twenty minutes or were masterful.

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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 03:02 pm:   

Heightened melodrama is one the tropes of Asian commercial cinema. Certainly it's absent in the work of directors such as Tsai Ming Liang, but then he's not too popular among Asians. I prefer to look at OLD BOY, which a good film, not a great one, as Shakespearean. :-) But I didn't find it too melodramatic until the end, perhaps because I;ve come to accept a certain amount of melodrama.


Rich, it wasn't just the southern stuff, the accents, et al, I thought Hudson was barely adequate, the story telling was clunky, and so forth.
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Stephen
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 03:21 pm:   

No, I didn't find it that melodramatic, considering what the guy's goes through -- all the psychological torture. The plot didn't feel too absurd either. Sure, it's not a common or regular story about ordinary people. It's not something that would likely happen. But I did find the plot believable and well crafted. Over the top, I agree with. But for this kind of movie, I think that works. The over the top fight scenes were cool. Totally brutal and raw. A lot better than, say, Kill Bill vol 1's over the top fight scene and much more believable. Remember, this is a thriller or psychological horror film, partly. It's about a man under extreme circumstances, pushed to the edge. I found the characters convincing, and agree with Laird about the actor being great as the antihero. I'm going to watch Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance...
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Stephen
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 03:38 pm:   

If you want examples of hightened melodrama, look at Japanese anime, which is really popular over there and here. It's cheesier in many ways, considering they're cartoon characters.

I don't watch much anime, but I saw a good one a while ago called Steam Boy. It's the same director who made Akira, which I haven't seen but heard is good. It has a Steam Punk setting and sensibility, in some ways. For an anime, it actually has a developed plot and characters. It drags on a bit near the end and some people may consider it's anti-science message simplistic, which, of course, it is. It's about a young boy, who's rebelious and a bit of a punk, who's mad scientist father and grandfather at opposite extremes become sworn enemies, but in the end redeem themselves. His dad becomes one of the bad guys. With the help of a bratty girl, Steam Boy combats his society driven by greed and technology.
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Stephen
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 03:43 pm:   

That second who's, should be whose, obviously. I'm tired...
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kellys
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 06:45 pm:   

Well, I certainly won't go to great lengths to argue against Old Boy, since it is a movie I enjoyed quite a bit and would highly recommend. And I do agree that the lead actor is quite dynamite, finding his performance to be grounded in psychological reality.

My problem is with the arch villain and his motivation for his actions -- he comes off like a super villain out of a comic book, and his impetus and means of carrying out his vengeance against the lead actor gave the film an air of absurdity. Otherwise--well done.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 07:00 pm:   

Y'know Kelly, there might just be a cultural difference involved.
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Rich
Posted on Saturday, August 27, 2005 - 09:01 pm:   

Thanks, Lucius. I was wondering what I missed.

Enjoyed OLD BOY myself and was quite content to keep an emotional distance from those characters.

Recently saw a Korean film called THE FACE which, although full of stock horror movie scares, was fun to watch.

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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 06:29 am:   

Saw LONDON VOODOO this week finally. Good fun, and great perf from Sara Stewart and the kid who played the horny au pair (a nice touch!). My peeves with it were the lack of a proper ending (how come it always seems like these movies run out of steam/cash before they can tie things up?), and the bit where the woman takes out the book and basically READS Lincoln all the backstory. God, I hate stock devices like that. Can't anyone tell a story anymore? But all things considered, I enjoyed it a lot. Definitely a cut above the standard genre fare.

It could have been sexier. I mean, how great would it have been if the voodoo spirit revealed herself by the way the wife acted in bed? Now that would have been clever and sexy! Am I the only one who thinks of these things???
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 06:49 am:   

Well, they sorta did that, Dave, by making her sexually aggressive and dissatisfied with her husband. That showed me the thng you wanted. They might have done a bit more, but short of turning it into an X-rated film, they couldn't do a lot more.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 08:24 am:   

Yeah, I read you, but I'm just saying it could have been more subtle. I like stories where people put the pieces together bit by bit (a la ROSEMARY'S BABY, for example).

SPOILER ALERT


I mean, I liked the scene where she was taunting him, but she went from meek wife to tigress and back in about three minutes. It was like hitting poor dumb Linc over the head. How about having him in bed with his wife and just starting to notice she is doing unusually aggressive stuff she never used to do? That would plant a seed of doubt without revealing all. Yeah, it would have to be carefully done, but you can have sexy bedroom scenes without going all the way into X-rated territory!

And we never find out who the lover is that she wants Linc's body for. That's another little plot hole...

I tend to quibble more with good films-that-could-have-been-great than with bad ones I just don't care about! Overall, LV was a winner, tho!




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JV
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 08:27 am:   

Spoiler alert--I give it all away re November below.







I saw November with Courtney Cox. Good acting. Interesting editing. Story sucked. Turns out everything that happens in the movie is just what's going through the Cox character's mind as she bleeding out from a gunshot wound to the belly in a convenience store. Might as well have been "It's all a dream."

JeffV
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 08:42 am:   

Dave, the other body in the hole in the basement was her lover.

Jeff, thanks. Saved me a trip.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 09:21 am:   

Y'know, they never quite made that clear. In fact, the shots of the tomb were really muddy. Maybe it's because I was watching on a small screen, but I found it very hard to make out what was in the hole. The scene was very dark and unclear. Did they explain how she got from Benin to London?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 10:24 am:   

There was enough of an explanation where I could fill in the blanks....
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 10:57 am:   

Sara Stewart was pretty darned good. It's unfortunate that her husband was such a bland character and didn't try to sneak a little voodoo nookie.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 10:58 am:   

November is supposed to be so bad that Cox wouldn't even do press for it.

I can name at least half a dozen "thrillers" in the last five years that have tried to pull that "it's all in his/her head" twist. It is now officially stale and should be retired.
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kellys
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 11:12 am:   

Don't know if Jim Jarmusch's Broken Flowers has been mentioned here yet, but I saw it over the weekend and found it to be pretty lousy. Lazy writing, acting, and directing -– not so much a movie with deadpan with as much as just being dead. I have enjoyed Billl Murray's stonefaced performances in Rushmore and Lost in Translation; here it seemed pretentious and tired. Maybe time for a new schtick Bill?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 11:15 am:   

Courtney Cox was all over the tube doing press for it.
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JV
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 11:23 am:   

I thought Broken Flowers sucked, too.

Well, I thought Cox should be proud of her performance, which was good. The movie just didn't add up to anything, though. Doomed from the start. Like building an ocean liner with a hole in the hull.

Gilliam's movie was just standard summer fare. It didn't bother me one way or the other. He says he did it for the money, to fund his Don Quixote movie, so I don't mind at all.

JeffV
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 11:39 am:   

Yeah, I didn't see Broken Flowers because of reasons stated....

Grimm would have better if Matt Damon had essayed a German accent....
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kellys
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 11:39 am:   

Too bad we won't ever see that Don Quixote movie. Or Good Omens or Watchmen. It'd be nice if Gilliam could get at least one of his dream projects off the ground.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 01:28 pm:   

Hmmm, I stand corrected then. But I definitely remember reading some news items re: promotional events she missed that surmised her absence may have been due to actor's remorse.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 01:37 pm:   

I saw her doing the Today show and she said she was extremely proud of the flick.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 02:26 pm:   

Well, that's what I get for buying the tabloids, I guess. The reviews I've read of Nov. weren't that hot.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 03:09 pm:   

Yeah, well. Jeff's description wasn't that hot!
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Stephen
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 04:58 pm:   

I saw Visitor Q. Disturbing as hell but also funny at times. I take it that Miike is partly commenting on Japanese culture.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 06:51 pm:   

I'm getting weary of Miike.

Jeff Ford just mentioned CABEZA DE VACA on his blog, and it reminded me of the time back in the early 90s when me and NicK Echevarria, the director of CABEZA DE VACA (an incredible movie) were working on ths script together about the Donner Party (partly set in contemporary times) and got hooked up with these two Russians. Oleg was the son of the president of the Ukraine before the break-up of the USSR and he had wound up with most of the oll leases in that country. The other was a woman, beautiful, a 10.6, named Tatiana who had dated a couple of movie stars. She was the brains of the outfit. All Oleg wanted to do was disco and Korean girls. Nick was a real serious, worried all the time, always asking me, Do you think they'll put up enough money? Tatiana was a trip. She believed the air on airplane was bad for you and traveled with all kind of antidotes. And she was always telling me about Russia. Like one time she said, "This is very bad, Lucius. My mother has lost all her money."
How's that? I asked. "The bank failed and the bank president hang himself." I said that was terrible and she goes, "Oh, no. Is good. They make him hang himself." Eventually Nick and I balied on them, but those Russians were months of fun. Anyway, you should watch CABEZA DE VACA if you haven't seen it.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 09:36 pm:   

I saw part of Brothers Grimm. It freaked out my oldest kid and I ended up going out with her to sit in the lobby and chill, while the younger one stayed inside with my wife and watched the whole thing. I don't feel I missed too much. Tidelands should make an interesting counterpoint. It's funny that Gilliam would think for an instant that he was making a big commercial movie about fairy tales, and then fill it with incomprehensible accents. His own worst enemy indeed....
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Stephen
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 03:32 am:   

That was the first movie I've seen by Miike, I think. I'll try to check out Cabeza.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 08:45 am:   

Lucius, why do you waste your time working on fictional scripts when your real-life adventures are so much more amusing?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 09:07 am:   

Well, this was both, right?

Actually, I'm writing a couple of stories about the movie biz and one''s about Tatiana. Another's about working as an extra on location in a movie set in Spain, a costume epic. I was a Goth. Some fun.

You ever seen Cabeza de Vaca? Gtreat movie, but hard to find.

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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 09:26 am:   

No, I'm not aware of it. What's it about?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 09:32 am:   

The early Spanish explorer Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca who came to America in the 1500s and was the first European to explore Texas and the SW. It's a hallucinated take on that. Herzog Aguirre Wrath of God pales by comparison, IMO.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 01:55 pm:   

I just watched the first episode of PRISON BREAK. Perhaps the most mind-bogglingly stupid tv drama in many, many years. I caught 18 TOTAL contrivances in the first forty minutes, just to position the story...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 02:29 pm:   

Yeah, I was planning on skipping PB. Think I'll still skip it..

Watched an old Visconti flick last night, Conversation Piece, starrring the elderly Burt Lancaster as a professor in Italy whose life and house are invaded by a group of young, sexy people, one of whom takes an unhealthy interest in him. Great film. Lancaster's late career work, Atlantic City, his films with Visconti, Local Hero, establish firmly that he was one of the best, if not consistently the best, leading man/screen actor of his generation....
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 05:33 pm:   

Don't forget Lancaster's Dr. Moreau.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 05:43 pm:   

I didn't see that. Good...? Or was that a joke?

Watched yet another movie called Face, this a Brit caper-gone-wrong film with Robert Carlyle and Ray Winstone. Weak ending, but up till then pretty great.
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kellys
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 07:02 pm:   

I thought Lancaster was great in Sweet Smell of Success. His menacing performance commands that film.

Ever see Visconti's The Leopard? A little too sterile for my liking, though beautiful to gaze at. Another good performance from Lancaster though.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 07:19 pm:   

Yep. Lancaster and all-time favorite Michael York.

The musketeers cheer!

And somewhere a runner runs...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 07:23 pm:   

Sweet Smell of Success was great! Tony Curtis, amazingly enough, was terrific.

Saw the Leopard. Book was better, but Lancaster was good.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 08:58 pm:   

It is almost worth seeing that first episode (being re-run on Thursday) to see just how much stupidity can be crammed into the first hour of an ongoing series. I mean, it IS entertaining on that level.

I noticed that Tony Curtis is ALWAYS terrific when he plays a sharpster or a phony. (Not only SWEET SMELL, but also SOME LIKE IT HOT). He had a short-lived tv series, MCCOY, that used the skill to uncanny effect. It's the phenom of a very limited actor who is very good within a very limited range. In his case, I think he excelled playing phonies because the audiences liked being able to see through him.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 09:17 pm:   

However, in Sweet Smell, his character arc took him away from his phoniness into sort of an epiphany. It was a more complex role than Some like it Hot. He also had a pretty good turn as the Boston Strangler.

Re: Prison Breaks. No thanks.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 11:31 pm:   

Lancaster's Moreau was very low budget, but I liked it a lot when I saw it. More dignity in it than the Brando version.

I saw Face after seeing Ravenous, as it was also made by Antonia Bird. I seem recall having the same opinion of it.

Now in confirming this, I see that Bird is making a movie about Burke and Hare--also featuring Carlyle again. Gotta love the title: THE MEAT TRADE. I believe she's a vegetarian. In the director's comments on RAVENOUS, she had some amusing things to say about the nearly raw steaks they were eating at the beginning of that film.

Looks like she's made some interesting movies for TV, none of which I've seen. Notably The Hamburg Cell, concerning the 9/11 hijackers. I assume these were all for British television which is why I've seen not a one.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 04:25 am:   

I saw Scream Blackula Scream. I actually liked it quite a lot.
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Stephen
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 04:30 am:   

It's got Pam Grier and William Marshall, as Blackula.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 04:59 am:   

I know it's not exactly a foolproof rule, on Tony Curtis; I mean, he was also pretty good in THE DEFIANT ONES and, as you say, THE BOSTON STRANGLER. But "phony" roles brought the best out in him. (Period roles were the worst.)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 05:21 am:   

Who can forget, Yonda lies the castle of my fadder, from the Black Knight .

Blacula is sort of fun....

I think I may have seen part of Moreau on TV. I'll find it somewhere and give a watch. The Val Kilmer-Brando Moreau is a horrid mess. Too bad Kilmer got Richard Stanley fired. I love the fact that Stanley remained on the set disguised as a melting dogman and kept a diary. Speaking of Stanley, I just picked up the uncut version of Dust Devil, which I really like. One of the most interesting horror movies ever,

Unlike a lot of people, I'm not a big fan of Ravenous. Certainly Carlyle was good, but I didn;t think the director switch was all that seamless and the movie suffered accordingly. It wound up being more slapstick, IMO, than black comedy. But it wasn't Bird's fault.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 06:27 am:   

Did anyone like Curtis at his sweaty, sleazy best as Joe McCarthy in Nic Roeg's INSIGNIFICANCE?
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Robert
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 07:15 am:   

Ever read Guerilla Filmmakers's Handbook? It had several chapters explaining what happened in making some films, from the script to filming. There's a large section on Stanley, dealing with Dust Devil and Moreau. There are a few other case studies like these.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 08:04 am:   

No, I haven't read GFH, but I did read sections of Stanley's diary, which were hilarious. Is there a section in GFH about Ravenous?

Have not seen Insignificance...
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Robert
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 08:32 am:   

Nothing about Ravenous in the edition I had. They've done a new edition, so there are probably more recent interviews.
Maybe the Stanley stuff was condensed from the diary
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 08:40 am:   

Don't know if I would call INSIGNIFICANCE a great film, but it's kind of fun...imagined chance encounters between Joe McCarthy (Curtis), Albert Einstein, Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio (Gary Busey, I think!).
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 10:11 am:   

I didn't realize Ravenous had a director switch...I know that Moreau did. Bird shares the commentary track with Damon Albarn; I haven't listened to the whole thing, but the parts I did hear were really entertaining. In the scene at the cave, Albarn is horrified and grossed-out, while Bird laughs merrily at his distress.

I love Ravenous for its take on an overused period setting, for the injections of manic madness, and some of the performances. Yes, the end is silly, even slapstick. But it has a gleeful energy rarely seen in horror--and especially not period horror.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 11:00 am:   

It had a young Czech director, an art house guy, who apparently was making a blacker comedy than the studio wanted. The switch partly explains why the film has so many continuity problems. I swear I can tell where Birds filming and the other guy;s footage. It was interesting, as it stands, but it would have been a lot better if they didn't make the switch.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 11:44 am:   

Ah. Interesting. More reason to listen to the various commentary tracks I guess.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 11:50 am:   

I wonder if they'll mention him. I wish I could recall his name, because he's done some good things...
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Robert
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 01:04 pm:   

From IMDB's trivia page on Ravenous:
Director Milcho Manchevski was replaced two weeks into production.

He was apparently also pulled from directing Three Kings, but they don't say when he was pulled (maybe before filming started?).
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 01:17 pm:   

Thanks, Robert
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 01:32 pm:   

Let me just say a few words about the Lars Von Trier/Jorgen Leth documentary THE FIVE OBSTRUCTIONS, which I watched Saturday.

The thrust of it is pretty simple...Von Trier and Leth play a game: Leth has to remake his 60s short "The Perfect Man" five times, each time with onerous conditions placed on the production by Von Trier to try to elicit different methods and responses from Leth. In the first, Leth is not allowed to use an edit longer than twelve frames, in the second, he is required to make the film (which involves an elegant, well to do character) with himself as the lead and a horrific Indian slum as the setting...You get the idea.

Each time, it is interesting to watch Leth stretch himself to solve the various creative puzzles and fit them into his vision of the film. Ultimately, after Leth produces some really marvelous work in response to Von Trier's challenges, both men discover they have learned something about themselves.

I found it a really involving and, at some points, kind of moving, exploration of the artistic process.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 01:57 pm:   

Sounds cool!!!!!
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 02:46 pm:   

Yeah, Dave.

Exactly, Lucius. I know Blackula's not all that good, but I find it funny and enjoyable.

I've heard there's a Blackula vs. Shaft...
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 11:09 pm:   

A friend has been feeding me a bunch of British comedy that I'd never managed to catch (not being in England), namely episodes of Brasseye, I'm Alan Partridge and Extras. I love them all. I've only so far seen one episode of Brasseye, the exceptionally funny special on Paedophilia; transgressive comedy at its best. Alan Partridge is the best thing I've seen Steve Coogan in, by far; I've only seen the first two episodes but they're both great. And then Extras, the new (?) Ricky Gervais show. This show has a great premise, but Gervais's character is the best thing about it. Painful, pathetic, ultimately sympathetic (unlike his character in The Office).
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Robert
Posted on Saturday, September 03, 2005 - 02:26 pm:   

I got Ong-Bak on DVD today. Luckily it has both Thai and English tracks, so I can still listen to the original music.

I hope Tom yum goong gets a US release soon, it's the next Tony Jaa film.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, September 03, 2005 - 02:47 pm:   

I watched an interesting Aussie horror movie made by the director of Razorback in 1978 -- Long Weekend. Very creepy. Sort of Peter Weir-ish. Didn't get a theatrical release in the States.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, September 03, 2005 - 10:57 pm:   

i saw spike lee's 25 HOUR yesterday. was mostly a failure as a film, but it had a few moments. didn't feel gibbed out of my time, at least.
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Laird
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 11:11 am:   

I watched The Vanishing last week--the original, not the remake with Sutherland and Bridges. I'm conflicted about this in a way I haven't experienced too often.

Unless the director's intent was chiefly allegorical, there are flaws that mar the narrative. Certain actions taken by the protagonist struck me as utterly implausible.

However...there are profoundly disturbing aspects to this picture and the portrait of the antagonist is one of the best I've ever seen. This latter redeemed the film's other shortcomings to the extent that it has stuck with me a week after the fact.

I think it works as a horrific morality play.

Anybody else seen this and have a take?
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 11:27 am:   

I just loved it. I watched with a growing sense of horror. That style of narration, letting the audience feel there no or very little hope, is not used enough. The remake is beyond bad.
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Laird
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 11:36 am:   

Yeah. The acting was wonderfully low key. Sluizer absolutely nailed the psychology of violent sociopaths.

As I said, it's one of those pictures I can't shake. Bad dreams, the works.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 11:50 am:   

It sticks with you, for sure. No bad dreams, but the final scenes remain vivid.
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 07:46 pm:   

I'm a big fan of Razorback, so I'll have to hunt down Long Weekend.

I saw The Vanishing a few years ago and the ending was awesome, but I seem to remember having some trouble getting into it and putting the pieces together. In the long run, I liked it a lot. Someone described the ending of the remake and I am still in shock.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 07:51 pm:   

It's not only the ending that's bad, it's that you know the ending is coming. It's Jeff Bridges in his worst ever performance instead of that cool French guy, it's everything...and what's so weird is, it's the same director.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 08:41 pm:   

I saw the original Vanishing in a theater and it's the only time I've ever seen an audience riveted by a black screen. (You know what I mean if you've seen it.)

Whatever narrative flaws you noted, Laird, I've forgotten them now. The crime and the unraveling of it stay with me still.
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Laird
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 09:01 pm:   

Hi, Gordon.

There was one incident toward the end that defied my suspension of disbelief. But the more I reflect on the story and discuss it with Erin and read how similarly the film haunted other viewers, the more I'm inclined to believe any flaws are beside the point.

It truly is more than the sum of its parts.

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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 06:37 am:   

Loved The Vanishing. Since the US remake sucks by unanimous acclaim, we shouldn't worry about spoiling it for anyone. Is it true they rewrote the ending to make a happy outcome? Treason!

Had a chance to see The Wicker Man on Monday. Really interesting stuff. Even if the Edward Woodward constable character was a little cartoonishly stiff and fussy (I mean, who could resist a midnight invitation from Britt Ekland?), the overall culture-clash theme was pretty novel and thought provoking. And I could watch Christopher Lee all day long.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 07:07 am:   

I caught Secret of the Beehive this weekend. What a movie. The narrative style was amazing, nothng told to the audience, everything implied -- the director gave the audience credit for some brains. The Frankenstien thing wasn't overplayed. Beautifully balanced and shot. Wow.

Also saw what a been descrbed as an avant-zombie flick, Les Revenants (They Came Back in English), an interesting film about men and women coming back undecayed from the grave and having to fit back into society. I need to watch it again, but a creepy little movie.

Also, TIME OUT, an excellent French movie about a guy who is fired from his job and doesn't tell anyone, not his wife, his parents, and making shady business deals with his friends to survive. The pressure builds on him and.....
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Laird
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 07:10 am:   

The Wicker Man is one of my favorites. Lee's performance was marvelous.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 07:14 am:   

In the "making of" featurette, they made a good point, that is, that nobody before or since has really done a story like that...an insular society that challenges Judeo-Christian belief systems and is at once "evil" and innocent. You almost root against the prissy, repressed Woodward because Lord Summerisle's philosophy is so much more appealing.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 07:34 am:   

Also, not exactly "good," but as comic relief, I located one of those Direct to DVD Seagal movies LS warned me about, Out of Reach. In it, an increasingly jowly Seagal, with noticeable shoe polish along the hairline, plays a wilderness survivalist who uncovers a white-slave ring in, of all places, Poland. Wow! So bad it was fun, especially the parts where Seagal's voice drops out of the soundtrack at random moments and is dubbed in by a guy who sounds nothing like him!

That settles it. I'm writing a Seagal script.
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Laird
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 03:45 pm:   

You're right about rooting against the Woodward character (although I enjoyed his OTT portrayal of a snotty prig).

I was pulling for the Summerisle folk the whole way. I also noticed upon watching it again, how the film possesses a few attributes of a musical. Gotta love the Maypole ditty...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 03:53 pm:   

Nick Cage's doing the remake
Nick Cage's doing the remake
And it's gonna have a happy ending....
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 04:05 pm:   

Saw the Dead Pool early this morning.

I've seen it a few times but it's been years. Bam! There's Jim Carrey of all people. And of course Guns 'n Roses.

Never really thought of Eastwood as a career launcher of sorts:-)

And the toy car chase is still the sendup that it ever was.

And Liam in a role which seems to fit...and rat tails!

And happy Harry putting a bullet in forehead after forehead...
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Laird
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 04:26 pm:   

Cage as a rigid, repressed, stiff-necked copper?

Brilliant!
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 07:57 pm:   

How do'ya know the ending's goin'ta be happy?

The ending should be creepy... they'll ruin it.

I like the first two Dirty Harrys, the best. It's downhill from there.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 06:24 am:   

THE DEAD POOL wasn't too good, but speaking of career launchers, did you notice a young, babealicious, pre-Queen-of-Sundance Patricia Clarkson in a damsel-in-distress role, as the newscaster Harry saves?

I understand feeling run rather high about this film on the board, but I watched BOUND last night and thought it was kind of a fun noir caper film. Whatever you think of the Wachowski Brothers, I don't see how you could make an unentertaining film with Joe Pantoliano and Gina Gershon.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 06:51 am:   

I think the wachowskis are toast. They're designing video games, filming comic books, just like everyone else.
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Stephen B
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 07:12 am:   

As for the Wicker Man remake. I wonder if they tried to get Lee but he turned 'em down? Probably.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 07:25 am:   

Who is playing Lord Summerisle in the remake? Bill Nighy would be fantastic!

I have even scarier movie news that a Wicker Man remake. I read yesterday, that they are working on an Iggy Pop biopic, starring -- Lucius, I want you to sit comfortably, have a glass of water handy and a nitroglycerin pill if you have them -- ELIJAH WOOD! BANG!

Hey, I could not make that one up.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 08:31 am:   

Nothing about the remake can outweigh the choice of the lead actor.

Wow. Great casting. I always thought of Jerry as a hobbit.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 08:43 am:   

Apparently, Summerisle will be played by a women: Ellen Burstyn.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 09:03 am:   

Well, at least they got a good Actress, but it still is gonna suck
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 09:11 am:   

Now, Christopher Lloyd...THERE would be a good remake Summerisle!
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 11:52 am:   

I enjoyed Bound much more than The Matrix.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 11:56 am:   

I thought Bound was good fun. And Jennifer Tilly and Gina Gershon were very sexy together. I like caper films where you get to see crooks thinking on their feet and dealing with double crosses. I am led to believe that this film has achieved sort of iconic stature in the lesbian community and it's not hard to see why.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 12:08 pm:   

Has a lesbian led you to believe that?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 12:13 pm:   

Or was it just water cooler talk with the guys?


I actually liked both films, Bound slightly more than Matrix. but have not felt compelled to watch either a second time.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 01:17 pm:   

Well, perhaps I jumped to a bit of a conclusion, but it was a reasoned inference. I was watching the Gina Gerson-as-rocker reality series ROCKED and, during an episode filmed in San Francisco, a succession of lesbian fans lined up outside her gig spoke rapturously about her performance in the movie. So maybe between "cult hit" and "icon," but, yes, a succession of lesbians led me to believe it.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 01:33 pm:   

Always trust a lesbian.
I once gave a reading in front of an all-lesbian audience, because of scheduling foul-up. It was not my finest moment.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 02:45 pm:   

Lesbians are to quality cinema as truck drivers are to roadside diners, a true bellwether...

I hope you weren't reading Valentine...:-)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 03:30 pm:   

no, but I was so nervous, I mispronounced the word, clitoris. I had a bunch of grim women glowering at me.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 04:44 pm:   

Is it CLIT-er-is or Clit-OR-is? I've always wondered about that.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 04:46 pm:   

Ask a lesbian....:-)
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Laird
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 04:47 pm:   

"Is it CLIT-er-is or Clit-OR-is? I've always wondered about that."

Depends how nervous you are. I feel for Lucius--one little slip of the tongue...
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 05:00 pm:   

So to speak.

Next time, try my favorite lesbian crowd icebreaker: "Boy, that Gina Gerson in Bound. She could snake my drain any ol' time!" Feel the sisterhood.
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 05:39 pm:   

Bound was fun...

-I had a bunch of grim women glowering at me. --Lucius

But even in failure therein is created a great story..."Grim Women" sounds like a story to me...

-did you notice a young, babealicious, pre-Queen-of-Sundance Patricia Clarkson -Dave G

I kept thinking of her as being Eastwood's Sandra stand-in. Should have tied the Dead Pool to Hitchcock then everyone would be star-bound :-)
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 04:09 am:   

actually, i think BOUND might have more of a straight male following. i was working as a projectionist when it came out and the cinema i was in ran it. crowd was predominently male. young male. actually, the same audience who thought THE MATRIX was the shit.

i didn't mind BOUND, but i thought the two main characters were pretty cliched--even cliched straight characters turned into females to subvert that slightly. but not enough, really.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 06:07 am:   

I thought it worked as a pomo take on the old "Double Indemnity" style noir.
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Lawrence A
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 09:28 am:   

I really liked BOUND, I mean as a thriller on its own terms not for the other reason straight guys like it, although I like it for that reason too I admit. Actually Gina Gershon once made fun of her Bound character, playing herself in an episode of the short-lived Denis Leary vehicle, the TV series THE JOB. In that episode Leary and partners had to bodyguard Gershon, protecting her from being mobbed by an adoring lesbian fanclub at her hotel. It was a very funny episode, Leary also taking the piss out of straight guys and their obsession with uh Saphic sexuality.

I liked that show, thought it was pretty good, naturally it was cancelled after only 1 season I think. Anyhow, if Gershon was poking fun at her lesbian fanclub and her role in BOUND, then maybe she really is an icon in the lesbian community.
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StephenB
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 02:54 pm:   

Haven't seen Bound, but I've had a hands on lesbian experience. A bisexual girl invited me home, one night, for some fun with her two friends, when I was wasted. They ain't like on the movies.:-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, September 09, 2005 - 08:07 am:   

That statement has ominous overtones...
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, September 09, 2005 - 10:35 am:   

Well, I'd never before seen such aggressive and brutal, oral and finger sex. I was a little shocked by it, actually. One of the lesbians was a full out big butch, with no interest in men at all. She didn't like me, considered me competition. The other was a really pretty straight girl, who, jaded from being mistreated by men (as is prone to happen to nice, pretty girls), turned lesbian. It was eye opening, and maybe even a little disconcerting, seeing how fierce they fucked.

I saw The Following. I like it the best of all of Nolan's movies. His flicks have gone down for me, with Batman Begins being the weakest.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, September 09, 2005 - 12:06 pm:   

Haven't seen a movie in quite a while. A friend lent me GOD OF COOKERY, but lately I've had too many good books to read.
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Lawrence A
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 08:02 am:   

StephenB you are making a complete ass of yourself, I'm embarrassed for you and I doubt I'm the only one. At least you have the excuse that you are what 19 or 20 years old, you are right?

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StephenB
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 09:39 am:   

Why is that, Lawrence? A little too much info?

I'll admit I got really lucky, happening into that situation. It just kinda happened. You know? It's not all it's cracked up to be. But I found the dynamic really interesting. I actually spent a lot of time just talking to them and asking them questions. I tried to let the one girl know that all guys aren't that bad. The butch lesbian didn't like that one bit. Anyway, I'm four years older than your estimate.
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Lawrence A
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 02:30 pm:   

Yeah a little too much info, not the place for it if you know what I mean. But no big deal. Maybe sell your experience as a story to Penthouse letters, although I assume they just have writers who make that stuff up. Maybe threadjack here for a sub-topic on all speculative fiction writers who have written some erotic fiction on the sides? But I don't think Lucius would appreciate that. Reminds me, Adam Troy-Castro occasionally posts up on these movie threads.

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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 02:34 pm:   

The woman who ran penthouse letters approached me to write for her back in the 90s. 800 bucks a pop. But I didn't do it.
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PM
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 08:12 pm:   

Don't you want folk to have better sexual experiences:-)

Would you consider this to have been damaging to your career?
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 08:24 pm:   

No, I would have done it. I just didn't have time.
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StephenB
Posted on Sunday, September 11, 2005 - 06:02 am:   

Well, my first reaction, was, I wouldn't write stories for Penthouse letters. That's before I saw the 800 bucks a pop, part.:-)

But seriously, probably not. I don't think that experience would make for a good penthouse letter, anyway.

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StephenB
Posted on Sunday, September 11, 2005 - 06:07 am:   

Now, if I ever write a lesbian sex scene, in a story. Or if a story features lesbian characters. That experience will come in useful.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, September 11, 2005 - 03:31 pm:   

This weekend I watched Werckmeister Harnonies, by the Hungarian Director Bella Tarr. This film was shot in black and white and is very stylized in the way of the films of Guy Maddin (though not so retro), also reminiscent in its dialogue style of early Bergnan a la Seventh Seal. For all his influences, Tarr is definitely his own guy. Harmonies concerns the visit to small town of a circus featuring the stuffed carcass of a whale and a mysterious man known as the Prince. There's a compelling eerieness about this film, enhanced by Tarr's use of long appproach shots. He uses a vert static camera....I want to watch this movie, and another of his, Damnation, again...
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 08:23 am:   

Big disappointment. I made a weird movie run to Kim's on St. Mark's Place in NYC and they were out of everything. The only thing I was interested in that they had was Claire Denis TROUBLE EVERY DAY with Vincent Gallo and Beatrice Dalle, but it required an all-region player. Man, I've got to get one of those!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 09:08 am:   

What's it with you and Vincent Gallo?

All-region -- 60 bucks.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 10:22 am:   

Trouble Every Day = cannibalism + nymphomania + Beatrice Dalle.

What's not to like?

Hey, it's not like I bought THE BROWN BUNNY...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 10:32 am:   

You rented it, thoiugh. :-)

Trouble Every Day.....Hmm.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 10:42 am:   

No, I didn't rent it, I saw it in a theater. Even worse! Hey, I had to see if the nasty scene bet Gallo and Sevigny was as bad as advertised.

Worse!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 10:42 am:   

Trouble Every Day is available from Diabolik for 12.99 in an all-region format. I know you don't buy online, but....

Sounds gruesome.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 11:40 am:   

Yeah...:-)
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 11:44 am:   

You gonna go for it:? Diabolik's secure. I've bought dozens of DVDs
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 02:23 pm:   

Yeah, I think I might...but not just yet. I just got back from NYC, so it's not a good moment for a splurge. But I'm sure I'll take the plunge. They also have some shock and horror stuff on there that I'm curious about...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 02:27 pm:   

May have. :-) Malefique is cool. But they only have three copies of the all region disc in stock, so don't wait too long.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 02:32 pm:   

At Kim's I asked for DUST DEVIL and THE BED THAT EATS (is that the same as MALEFIQUE?), but they were out. They did have a film I saw on Diabolik called DEAD END...anyone seen it?

Anyone else shocked that the Laura Linney exorcism flick so thoroughly wiped out the competition at the box office this week? Is it any good?
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 02:48 pm:   

Now if only she can exorcise her performance in Mystic River.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 03:25 pm:   

Malfefique is a lovecrafty story about four men in a prison cell that find a book in the wall that will lwt them escape. Very cool.

Haven't seen Dead End. '

The Ecorcism movie was the only one that got any ad push. Haven't seen it. Don't want to.
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Robert
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 08:01 pm:   

I just saw Grizzly Man. There really seemed to be a disconnect between Treadwell saying bears are dangerous, and then his behavior around them, a disconnect between his "love" of animals and his anger when they didn't behave how he wanted them to.

The sort of loving and harmonious view of nature he seems to have is one that always annoys me, I've never seen it from people who grow up with nature, just from city folks who want to get back to a simpler life, and feel nature is friendlier than it really is. When you grow up with nature, the view is really different.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 08:12 pm:   

...and Canadians. :-)

Yup. The guy was a trail mix looney. Too bad he and his girl had to die, but he was asking for it .
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 06:06 am:   

But, most importantly, Herzog's probing film answers one of the eternal questions that have plagued mankind. We now know that, yes, a bear definitely DOES shit in the woods.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 06:24 am:   

And occasionally they shit eco-activists...
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 10:53 am:   

:-)

Hey, you can both love and respect nature. Just because it can be scary, doesn't mean you have to avoid it. Just don't be stupid about it.

At least it's not corrupt or artificial.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 11:45 am:   

Who's avoiding it. I'm just not have no desire to hang out a grizzly;s ass....
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Robert
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 11:55 am:   

You don't have to avoid nature, just realize it's dangerous and take precautions. For all of Treadwell's talk about how dangerous it was, it seemed like he didn't think it applied to him. Anyone else would be killed by bears, but he was "friends" with the bears, so he was safe.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 12:32 pm:   

Well, yeah, there's plenty of danger in nature. Some people though, like field zoologists and wildlife photographers, who study and photograph large predators, accept the risks in their job and generally know what they're doing. Kinda like Goodall and Fossey with primates, sounds like Treadwell was trying to connect with and understand bears on a new level. To push the limits. Bears are intelligent animals, but grizzlies are also the most powerful land predators...

I'm going to wait for Grizzly Man on video. I'm holding out to see The History of Violence in the theatre.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 12:40 pm:   

I guess I don't know enough about Treadwell. But, like you say, he had to know he was playing with fire. Still, it goes to show that he was a brave man... maybe a little nuts...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 12:52 pm:   

Everything I've read about Hist ory is offputting. Those who like it say it's a decent thriller, those who love it, say it's a decent thriller, but there must be more to it...after all, it's Cronenberg...

Treadwell was a fool, Stephen. That;s not being brave, that's being stupid.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 12:55 pm:   

Can't there be courage, in the fool?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 01:03 pm:   

http://outside.away.com/outside/news/200401/200401_blood_brothers_1.html

Here's a balanced account.

Giving your life for a good reason is brave, giving your life for a fantasy is foolhardy
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 01:34 pm:   

Cronenberg's movie is supposed to be ultraviolent, according to a review I read. They said it was the hit of the Toronto filmfest, tho.

Treadwell was a bit of a nut. He was obviously a person with emotional problems. He claimed to want to "protect" the bears, even though they are huge, powerful predators in a national park, but obviously, he needed them more than they needed him. In his mind, he created this pristine, natural society he could fit into, to replace the complex human society he was dropping out of. Ultimately his fantasy came crashing down.

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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 02:47 pm:   

I see what you mean. Based on one quote, it seems like he almost wanted to go that way. But I wonder if he still thought that, as he was being killed... Probably not..

It always bothers me a little, to hear about the bears getting killed, after an attack. In some cases it may be the right decision, but it's really just another way to make people feel safer. Like, why did they shoot the young bear as well, just because he came around? Bears are obviously not as accountable for their actions as we are, yet we give them the death penalty...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:08 pm:   

They shot them because they were being aggriessive--unlike Treadwell, they were concerned for human life. And it's Treadwell's fault that they felt compelled to shoot them--if it wasn't for him, they wouldn't be coming round. Like the ranger said, she'd never forgive him if he caused tthem to shoot one bear.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:25 pm:   

Yeah, exactly. And because of that, Treadwell's better off playing the fool. 'Cause otherwise, he looks kind of like an asshole, baiting bears...
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:30 pm:   

Still, he probably did mean well for the bears. And he did care about at least some human lives -- his girlfriend, who he told to save herself while he was getting torn apart.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:35 pm:   

And why not relocate the bear to Kodiak Island?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:36 pm:   

He didn't care enough to keep her out of harm's way.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:38 pm:   

Oh, I don't know, Lucius. Maybe he just respected her enough as an equal? She knew what she was getting into, and they were in it together.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2005 - 03:42 pm:   

Can't there be courage, in the fool? -- Stephen B

Historically the two don't go well together as they tend to be mutually exclusive...
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 09:08 am:   

I'm no forest ranger, but isn't part of it that once certain animals develop a taste for human flesh, they become too dangerous and must be put down?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 09:14 am:   

Then they were both whackos, Stephen. Neither one of them, obviously, knew what they were getting into.

Right-o, Dave.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 09:42 am:   

They were great for each other...

I saw a decent, kinda cheesy thriller, from the 80s, called, The Hitcher. Builds good suspense and keeps you guessing, with twists. The main character's an idiot, his repeated incompetence, resulting in more and more deaths. The guy who plays the maniac hitcher does a good job.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 10:00 am:   

That guy is the great Rutger Hauer, the Dutch actor who starred in art house movies in Holland like Men of Orange, first appeared in American film as the Roy character in Bladerunner and went on to star in a kazillion B movies such as Blind Fury.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 10:47 am:   

Hauer in the early Verhoeven flicks is great: Spetters, Soldier of Orange, Flesh and Blood. Especially Flesh and Blood. Most recently totally wasted in the latest Batman thing, he's almost always fun to watch.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 11:13 am:   

Right on, Marc. His B-movies are often very entertaining.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 12:51 pm:   

Don't forget his career high point, as Roy Batty in Ridley Scott's BLADE RUNNER ("I want more life...f***er..."). A friend of mine always insisted that BLIND FURY was the funniest b picture he ever saw. THE HITCHER was pretty good, as I recall. Hauer is so creepy. The finger in the french fries and the heroine getting pulled apart by trucks were so off-the-wall gory that they have stuck with me all these years.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 01:04 pm:   

The heroine was a young Jennifer Jason Leigh. Blind Fury is great--and Randall "Tex" Cobb is one of the villlains.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 01:10 pm:   

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