HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Good Movies

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Good Movies « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, May 15, 2004 - 12:14 pm:   

This'll probably be a pretty short thread. However, I did see a movie last night that qualifies as a good movie, Hector Babenco's CARANDIRU. Babenco, as you may recall, directed the great humanist Brazillian movie, PIXOTE, among others, This film, based on an infamous prison massacre that occurred in Brazil several years ago, is beautifully made, and does a great job of humanizing the prisoners who were slaughtered. It perhaps does too good a job of this, as many these men were offenders of the worst sort, and there is sometimes a strong whiff of cliche about Babenco's portraiture of them and too little humanity brushed into his hasty portraits of their oppressors. Nonetheless, there are some exquisitely mounted vignettes in the movie, some tremendously well observed cultural detail (always valuable for writers), and it is so far superior to most domestic films, it's not worth straining for a comparative metaphor.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

richard
Posted on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 07:15 am:   

In the interests of prolonging the thread, then - what about Laurel Canyon? Not flawless, but nonetheless a domestic (for you guys) movie with real characters, beautifully acted and above all providing SOME SPACE TO THINK, which Hollywood seems generally not to like you to have (why IS that, I wonder). For me it worked like Lost in Translation and, a while back, Feeling Minnesota in reminding me that the US still produces some quietly excellent work - it's just you have to go looking for it, not just watch the vast media-display skies
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 08:19 am:   

You can still find some good indie work in the States, but, increasingly, young domestic (and foreign) directors are using first and second films as resumes in order to get work in Hollywood and so we don't see too many John Sayles-like careers. In my view, the indie scene is way less dynamic than it was at the end of the century. Just as happened in rock and roll, the indie film is in process of being co-opted and good small films are fewer and far-between.

I wasn't a big fan of Lost In Translation; I basically detested the characters, but., yeah, there are some decent small flicks.. I'm just afraid it's an endangered species...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

R.Wilder
Posted on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 11:22 am:   

Saw PIXOTE at the Toronto Film Festival back in the autumn of '81. I was a youngster and was blown away. I remember the scheduled screening was the French film "Diva," but for some reason the print hadn't arrived. PIXOTE was substituted. We were pissed off, but after PIXOTE I remember a solemn conversation in a pub, swilling Canadian lager and mulling over the experience into the wee small hours. It's one of the only films I can remember from a blurry week of screening after screening.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 11:52 am:   

Yeah, mon! PIXOTE is awesome. Even more poignant is the documentary made about the street kid whom Babenco found to play Pixote. The kid did some more acting, but was drawn back to the streets and eventually was killed.
There are a couple of new Brazilain films debuting at the Seattle film festival next week, which I'm hoping to see. If I do, I'll post about them here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 10:42 am:   

Just had a chance to see Gus Van Sant's ELEPHANT, which I thought was quite interesting, if only for the way it approached an emotionally-overwrought and media-oversaturated series of events and examined them in a clean, dispassionate, matter-of-fact way that eschewed any kind of sermonizing or easy answers. I found it very affecting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:12 am:   

I was kinda disappointed in ELEPHANT myself. I didn't see it broke any new turf and I also thought the gay sruff was really cheap by way of assigning motivation. I mean, it was interestingin parts, the first part of the film especially, but overall I was let down. But hey, the French liked it. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:29 am:   

Now that you mention it, there were some false notes.

Yeah, when the two killers started making out in the shower, I remember thinking, "Well, that HAD to happen, didn't it? I mean, you can't have a teen sociopath without some sort of sexual preference or gender identity angle, can you?" Yes, that was, as you say, a very cheap way of approaching that. In fact, I would almost believe that getting bombarded with paste or whatever that goo was in the middle of chemistry class was a more realistic motivation. As Van Sant left it, it was gay + latch-key kid = psycho killer. The Nazi doc on the telly was a bit heavy-handed to (jack)boot.

Another sort of gratuitous, ripped-from-the-cultral-studies-textbook moment was when the three "mean girls" (why do they always rove in threes?) went into the bathroom stalls and started gagging themselves in unison. Too easy.

But it was nice to see the story unfold in the way Van Sant told it, soberly, without all the hand-wringing and breast-beating and recriminations. I think he deserves credit for that, even if the temptation to dip his toe in the stereotype pool proved a little too much.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:37 am:   

No, I liked the disaffected camera style, I just thought when he got away from neutrality he made all the wrong choices, and that he should have done more with the film, maybe showed a wider range of reactions...I don't know. Something.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris Dodson
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 03:47 pm:   

This one hasn't been released yet, but I've got high expectations for it: Richard Kelly's Knowing. Last I heard, it's supposed to be showing up sometime this year. The blurb says: "In 1958 a time capsule is accidentally unearthed which contains drawings by children predicting future events that have come to pass." Kelly is, of course, the guy who wrote and directed Donnie Darko, so he's proven himself adept with that type of material. Should be pretty good. *fingers crossed*

Chris Dodson
Journal: The Passion of the Chris
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 03:50 pm:   

Yeah, Chrs, I'll go see that. They're showing the director's cut of DD at the Seattle Film Festival, and I'm hoping to see that too....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 04:51 pm:   

Zatoichi, June 4th and 6th, at Cinerama!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 05:02 pm:   

Yup. There's a couple of other movies I',m looking forward to seeing a bunch....

Memories of Murder, a Korean thriller with a kind of laid-back approach, and Last Life In the Universe, a big rep Thai movie, a love story which has Chris Doyle, Wang Kar Wai's cinematographer -- he also did The Quiet American....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 05:25 pm:   

Doyle is also leading a workshop; I was just reading that. Although I adore Maggie Cheung, I can't stand Wang Kar Wai; In the Mood for Love was painful for me. But I am capable of separating WKW from his cinematographer.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 05:28 pm:   

And incidentally there's another one for the increasingly long short "good movies" thread: Irma Vep. Sigh. Maggie Cheung as herself, and almost as adorable as her role in Green Snake.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 05:35 pm:   

Hated Elephant. Bored me to tears, and while I understand what he was trying to do, it left me rooting for the shooters.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 05:40 pm:   

Only Wang Kar Wai movie I like is Fallen Angels, which I think is really good. Great cinematography. One of the characters is this guy who's mute because he ate poisoned pineapple and makes his living by breaking into business that are closed and opening them up late at night and selling stuff.

Doyle is awesome, in my view. One of the very best.

Yup. Maggie. Irma Vep. Excellent.

I actually was rooting for ELEPHANT to end. I think the cinema verite stuff could have worked, but everything else he did pretty much sucked.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 05:50 pm:   

I haven't liked a Van Sant movie since MY OWN PRIVATE IDAHO. That and DRUGSTORE COWBOY were an awesome beginning to a career that has gone spiralling to nowhere...spiralling inward or outward, I can't honestly tell.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 06:10 pm:   

Actually, for me it was Drugstore Cowboy and that be it. Maybe half of IDAHO. He lives here in Portland and I see him now and again because of mutual friends. Nice guy, but I have to hold my tongue, especially when it comes to Psycho...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ellen
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 07:28 pm:   

I thought Elephant pointless--or perhaps more accurately shallow. I got the point within five minutes of the start of the movie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 07:52 pm:   

Well, I think we're almost ageed on that, huh? :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 07:59 pm:   

Lucius: I don't know if I told you about this one, but I caught this flick on IFC or Sundance -- Onibaba, a Japanese movie about these women living in a wilderness of reeds. The photography struck me as some of the most beautiful black and white I'd ever seen and the story was awesome.
While I'm at it, saw the first half of Kill Bill recently and thought it sucked the big wazoom. Not just sucked but it damn near put me to sleep.
Also saw a cool documentary on Derrida recently. Who knew, I figured I'd give it about two minutes and it would have me off to dreamland, but to tell you the truth old Jacques came off as being a pretty cool guy and he even made some sense.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 08:09 pm:   

Yeah, Jeff... Onibaba's great. The guy's next movie is pretty good too. Kind of Onibaba 2. Kuroneko. Sam. H. mentioned it on another thread somewhere.

Skipped Kill Bill. My feeling was why would I want to watch a film geek's homage to sword movies, when I can catch the real deal? I liked JACKIE BROWN a lot, though.

This might interest you...if you don't already know about it. There's a Darger documentary called In The Realm of the Unreal. It's playing at the Seattle Film Festival. Looks pretty great.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 08:35 pm:   

Maybe I can entice Sammy to burn me a copy of Onibaba. I can't imagine he doesn't have it. I liked Jackie Brown also. As for the Darger documentary, do you think they might be selling DVD copies of it at the Festival? Are you going? Let me know, I'll send you some cash to get me one if that's possible. If not, maybe it'selling online. I'll check. I wonder if Liz Hand knows about this. She's very into Darger.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 08:44 pm:   

Here's the info on the film:

In the Realms of the Unreal
USA, 2003, 81 minutes

Henry Darger was a man who kept to himself. When he died in 1973, his landlords discovered hundreds of illustrations and a 15,000 page novel about seven little girls waging war against evil men. Incorporating his artwork into her film, Jessica Yu transports us into the world of Darger's imagination.

I don't think I'll be able to catch this one -- there are so many films, and I'm only able to be there a few days of the three week festival. I doubt there are DVDs yet. Unless they're classics or HK films, most of the movies shown are either brand new or won't get a general release or both. I'll post the info on Liz's topic.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 08:54 pm:   

Lucius: Thanks!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 09:40 pm:   

Here's a review of the Darger film:

 Buy posters from this movie at AllPosters.com
List Price:   $29.95
Price:   $20.37
find out more information SCREENED AT THE 2004 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL: "In the Realms of the Unreal" is the name of the 15,000-page children's fantasy novel written by Chicago janitor Henry Darger, who left it among his things when he died in 1973 at the age of 81. The title is borrowed for Jessica Yu's uncommonly interesting and lovely documentary about Darger and his work.

Darger himself seemed to dwell in an unreal realm, as documented in the other major written work he left behind, his life story. He had a Dickensian childhood, more or less orphaned, sent to a home for "feeble-minded children" (which he doesn't appear to have been) and made to do menial labor on work farms. As an adult, he was reclusive and a devout Catholic. He wanted to be left alone. He never married. The hundreds of paintings he did to accompany his book suggest he had a limited knowledge of the opposite sex: The children are often painted naked, and the little girls have penises.
Coming from other minds, this would be creepy and unsettling. But Yu's interviews with the people who dealt with Darger -- his landlords, his neighbors, and so forth -- reveal a man universally considered innocent and child-like. He was naive, maybe a little feeble-minded after all, and had no prurient interests of any kind, at least not of which he left behind any evidence.
Was he crazy? Probably at least slightly. For 10 years, he kept a detailed journal of the weather, comparing it with the forecasts. He seemed angry that the meteorologists got it wrong so often. This is not the behavior of a non-crazy person.
What makes the film so fascinating is its dual stories: one, of Darger himself, and two, of his "In the Realms of the Unreal" novel. His colorful paintings are animated a bit to give them life and whimsy, and the story itself is a simple, charming piece about a band of seven little girls who lead a fight against an evil warlike nation.

It parallels his real life, too, which gives it poignancy. Did Darger miss his own lost childhood and write this story as a means of recapturing it? It would appear so, though Yu takes the interesting tack of NOT interviewing any psychologists or experts. This is refreshing, as it allows Darger and his work to remain pure, untainted by analysis or dissection. (This is a man who wrote thousands of pages with no intention of anyone ever reading them, much less having them put under a microscope.) He was child-like, his writing was unpolished and quaint, and both are preserved in this gratifying, poignant documentary.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 10:03 pm:   

Lucius: Great. It sounds like it'd be worth seeing. Darger's art is kind of partly creepy to me. I'm fascinated with outsider art, but the sexuality in this stuff doesn't seem all so innocent to me. Could be something I'm bringing to the stuff. It's very whimsical and unbelievable on one hand, and unsettling on the other. I like that detail of him keeping the journal on the weather and comparing it to the forecasts. That's bona fide kooksville there.
I prefer this guy Finsters paintings to the Darger stuff, but I'd still like to eventually see this film.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 10:21 pm:   

Jeff: don't know Finster. Me, I like Goya. Darger's a big item with my son, and I own the massive book -- he interests me, but I'm not obsessed like the kid. I like that the filmmaker didn't interview experts or shrinks. Sounds like good sense to me. I guess my favorite outsider artist is that guy who built the thrones and religious items out of gold foil in his garage. Can't recall his name. Totally beautiful stuff.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 10:28 pm:   

James Hampton. Here's an url:

www.forteantimes.com/articles/150_jamesjanitor.shtml
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 12:23 am:   

Speaking of good movies, I found Captain Ron on dvd tonight for $6.99.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 02:48 am:   

By the way, Lucius, you didn't miss anything with Kill Bill. I was pretty bored through the whole thing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 05:19 am:   

Has anyone here read Darger's novel [sampled is probably more accurate, I don't think it has been released as a complete work] and if so, would they care to comment?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 05:27 am:   

Hey, Jason...I love Kurt Russel. Greatest B movie actor of his generation, and his role in DARK BLUE wiped out Denzel's similar role in TRAINING DAY. Captain Ron's fun.

And yeah, like I said, I hate film geek homages, so--despite being a Michael Madsen fan--I'm giving the Bills a pass.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 05:33 am:   

Bruce, the big book, In The Realm of the Unreal, was plenty for me. It was fascinating and the guy definitely had a unique viewpoint, but I think more would be less for me with Darger...It'd be kind of like having a box set including myriad outtakes from some relatively monochrome indie band. Guys like this ultimately interest me as characters more than they do as artists...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 10:52 am:   

DARK BLUE was a lot of fun. (I assume you were a big fans of the ESCAPE FROM...movies, too...) But then, I can watch anything with Ving Rhames, even that awful Don King TV movie he was in.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 11:13 am:   

What I've heard (not having seen pt. 2) is that pt 1 is the action fiesta, and pt 2 is the character/plot fiesta. Madsen isn't in pt 1 for more than about 30 seconds.

But yeah, I'm probably going to skip pt 2 entirely and just get the Kitano/Zatoichi disc instead.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 11:26 am:   

Dave, Yeah, I like most of Kurt's ouvre. :-) Little movies like BREAKDOWN really do it or me.

Jason,

yeah, I heard that Madsen had a big part in 2. Maybe I'll catch it when it hits cable...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 12:18 pm:   

If you're a Madsen fan, did you enjoy him in the sickest network TV show ever, Vengeance Unlimited. It was great. It was as if they took Mr. Blonde and tried to turn him into an Equalizer-type audience favorite. Definitely a singular moment in American TV.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 12:22 pm:   

Yes I did enjoy that! I loved it. Pissed me off when they dumped the show. I got to know Madsen on Lopez Island up in the San Juans. he was up there filming Free Willy and I had a rented cabin and was writing. We used to drink in the same bar, this place called The Galley.. Great fucking guy. If I hadn't liked his work before, I would have become a fan. The poor man's Robert Mitchum....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 01:27 pm:   

How was his poetry? I hear the guy is a poet.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 01:36 pm:   

Well, it's all right. It's a little self involved. Bukowski Lite. Jason Williams has a great story about being at some awards deal where a dead drunk Madsen was getting a prize for his poetry. All I personally recall is that one poem began: I have fucked a lot of women....
I tend to think it;s something he does when he's drunk. Poetry, I mean.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 01:59 pm:   

Well, I guess you can't blame the guy. He gets to tell total strangers he's fucked a lot of women and instead of being called a braggart, he's called a poet. Pretty smart, if you ask me.:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 02:08 pm:   

Oh, I wasn't casting aspersions. Just commenting on quality. Madsen is very non-movie star-ish. He says some dumb shit, but then admits to it...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 07:16 pm:   

"...In The Realm of the Unreal, was plenty for me. It was fascinating and the guy definitely had a unique viewpoint, but I think more would be less for me with Darger..." Michael Swanwick might say it was a Surplus of Darger. Oy.

Thanks Lucius, I'll give the MacGregor book a go. What might make an interesting read could be an overview of monolithic artists like Henry Darger; John Bavard, the painter of the three-mile Mississipi panorama, Gutzon Borglum and Korczak Ziolkowski, etc.

Christo can go hawk pink Saran wrap...I just don't get that guy.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 07:44 pm:   

A three mile Mississippi panorama. Wow. I'd rather go get drunk in a casino in Biloxi. :-) That's all the Mississippi I want.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 08:44 am:   

Say, when is that Crazy Horse statue supposed to be finished, anyway?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 09:34 am:   

Beats me. But I don't know if that qualifies as outsider art....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 09:41 am:   

The Ziolowski family's still working on it without committing to a completion date. Check ot the following site for the latest...

http://www.crazyhorse.org/news/spring2004/index.shtml

Yep, three miles depicting the entire Mississippi eastern shore from St. Louis to New Orleans. The painting got torched in a fire but was immortalized in R.A. Lafferty's 'All Pieces of a River Shore'.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 10:36 am:   

Wow. Pretty weird. Too bad it got torched. Wonder if it was arson?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 11:27 am:   

Nope, it sounds like it was a barn fire in Chicago. [Probably started by a cow :0)] It does seem that all the famous panoramas, a brief if loony vogue in the 19th century, were all lost. Banvard was an interesting case,; he made a million bucks off of displaying his work, built a mockup of Windsor Castle and then got his ass handed to him by P.T. Barnum, losing all.

I realize this is far afield from the 'Good Movies' theme, but I think that says something right there.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 12:34 pm:   

Crazy Horse doesn't qualify as outsider art? Come on, Lucius, try finding a gallery big enough to display that thing INSIDE...:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 12:43 pm:   

"I realize this is far afield from the 'Good Movies' theme, but I think that says something right there"

Well, it was meant to be a long-term thread, to grow over the months.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 12:45 pm:   

Dave, well, when the Jovians come to take over the planet, they'll build something big enough to enclose it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 06:55 pm:   

Saw a very enjoyable little movie on HBO today called Smoke, with Harvey Keitel and William Hurt, written by Paul Auster. In trying to read more about it on the internet, I found a statement by someone who said there was a sequel to it. But they never mentioned the name of the sequel. Can't find it. Anybody know if this is so and if the film is any good?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 07:25 pm:   

Jeff, that would be BLUE IN THE FACE. It should be available on DVD. I didn't much care for it, but then I wasn't crazy about SMOKE except in nostalgic terms, because I used to love right off Seventh Ave where much of the filming was done. Michael J Fox and Mira Sorvino are in the sequel, which didn't make me want to like it, so maybe I'm not a good judge.

Best movie I've seen this year--by a mile--remains CARANDIRU.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 07:26 pm:   

PS -- some people swear by Blue in the Face, say they like it better than original, so maybe that's a better cue for you...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 07:29 pm:   

Hi Jeff. It's called BLUE IN THE FACE, but I don't think it's technically a sequel. It's more like improv riffs off the original movie, leftover footage and the like.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 07:31 pm:   

Oops, sorry. Took a call in mid-post and missed my place in line.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 08:02 pm:   

Lucius & Gabe: Thanks for the info. It doesn't sound as promising. I liked the quiet nature of Smoke and how the themes of the separate stories intertwined. I was in kind of a mood for something like that. I'm really getting sick of shoot'em up and CGI effects. Saw Once Upon a Time in Mexico on DVD the other night. It had a good perfomrance by Reuben Blades and Depp cracked me once or twice, but mostly it was just a bunch of the same old crap. This coming off my having seen Kill Bill #1 recently, yuck, too much of this stuff. Seems pointless after a while. I'll check out CARANDIRU. Always searching for something good.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 08:32 pm:   

Jeff, unless somebody pays my ass, I'm not doing studio flicks anymore. It's just not worth it. the exception to that is, if I'm in the mood for a brainless comedy, like maybe DODGEBALL, then that might happen. But basically my feeling is that there are enough good movies I haven;t seen to last for years...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 08:51 pm:   

Lucius: Is anyone paying you to review this one that's out now with the EVIL WEATHER PATTERNS? It looks like a snoozefest. One of the most harrowing moments is supposed to be when the Empire State Building freezes. Might be some nice fodder for a review, though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 09:33 pm:   

Jeff, I've been thinking of reviewing DAY AFTER TOMORROW and the new Harry Potter as one movie. because I've been asked to do both, and I don't think either one's worth a whole review. Also, there seems to be a kind of syncretic process going on with movies nowadays (Jason vs Freddy, Alien vs Predator), and I sense such a resonance between HP and DAY AFTER...well, not really, but I believe I can make the case. :-) I already saw DAY AFTER. The first hour is fun -- it does what disaster flicks should do; the second hour is kind of like freezing to death.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2004 - 05:53 am:   

BLUE IN THE FACE had no script and was shot in three days; all improvisation. There's some cute stuff starring Ian Frazier, about his quest to rescue plastic bags stuck in the branches of trees. It gets by (barely) on charm.

Appreciation of KILL BILL VOL 1. depends entirely on your tolerance for its long martial arts scene; there is nothing on its scale in Vol. 2, but that film has some stuff you would not expect from Vol 1. Seriously.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2004 - 06:08 am:   

Lucius: I'm guessing I'll see that review in F&SF, if you are really going to do it. Looking forward to it.

ATC: Thanks for the info on the movie. You make it sound a little more interesting. Maybe I'll get that one just for the hell of it. I've heard that Kill Bill#2 is different, so I'll probably check it out. I have nothing against Martial Arts flicks, especially good ones. But for some reason that KB#1 just didn't grab me.

Both of you guys tried to warn us about the dangers of Van Helsing, but I was doomed to take the kids.
Nothing I saw disputes what either of you said.

Terry Bisson just told me the other day that Bubba Hotep is on DVD now. I want to check that one out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2004 - 06:32 am:   

Jeff, Bubba Hotep's fun and Bruce Campell is a very cool Elvis.

I'll be doing the aforementioned review for ELectric Story; I'm doing THE CHRONICLE OF RIDDICK for Gordon.

I haven't seen either Bill and don't plan to. My feeling is, when there are so many terrific martial arts related films -- films that are both good movies and great physical exhibitions with actors who're physically capable of doing their own stunts, stuff like King Hu's work and THE RED LOTUS SOCIETY, ZATOICHI, and so on, then why should I bother with what is essentially a film geek's homage to same featiring creaky old Carradine and a physical incompetent, Uma, who has to be edited into proficiency like Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren? You want to see something funny, check out LITTLE TOKYO, a MA film featuring Lundgren and Brandon Lee. The difference with which the two men were filmed in their fight scenes is pretty hilarious Anyway, I thought the direction Tarantino was starting off in with Jackie Brown was a good one; all I've seen of the Bills -- extended studio clips -- make me want to run. The only homage of this sort I've ever liked was CROUCHING TIGER HIDDEN DRAGON; it was a loving homage, not an arch one, as is the case with the Bills; yet even that wasn't up to the object of its affection, the old King Hu movies. But I'll be interested to see how you feel about it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2004 - 02:53 pm:   

Lucius, did you ever find a good source for King Hu movies? I found the wonderful "Fate of Lee Khan" after reading that King Hu was Ang Le's inspiration for Crouching Tiger, but that's the only one I've found so far. "Lee Khan" was like Dragon Inn with a script by Jack Vance, starring the HK equivalent of Debbie Reynolds. There were so many odd things in the mix--I loved it and wanted more.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2004 - 03:24 pm:   

Yeah, Lee Khan is definitely a Vance-ian thing. I wish I still had a copy-- lost it somehwere. I'm not very good about keeping track of stuff. I currently have A TOUCH OF ZEN, which I like a lot, and in the past, when I've bought King Hu films, I just Google him and look around. I bought ZEN online, but I can't remember where. It was used, I know that. One of the more pricey used DVD sites. Maybe someone else on the board is more organized about this kind of thing than I am. God, I hope so. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 10:34 am:   

Lucius: Have you heard anything, thumbs up or down, about this Bukowski documentary that's just come out. The New York times has a brief piece about it (not really a review) and The New Yorker just mentioned it this month. I was wondering if it's supposed to be any good.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 11:33 am:   

Hi, Jeff...Naw, I haven't heard anything about it. I read with Bukowski once, back in the Cenozooic when he was on the college poetry circuit and I was a young nothing, Can't say we exchanged much conversation, but I did get to see him puke on stage -- he threw up into a grand piano. I thought that was pretty cool, but was more-or-less alone in this view.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 06:53 pm:   

Lucius: That's a class act. At the last reading I did in New Paltz, I was mightily close to doing the same (no grand piano). A previous late night in a dark field at an old picnic table out next to motel 87 put the whammy on me. Let me know if you here anything about this one.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 06:54 pm:   

Lucius: By "this one" I mean the movie, of course.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 07:20 pm:   

Will do, Jeff.

Puking always adds a special something to a performance. Best I was ever involved in was a date an old band of mine played in Ann Arbor, when my horn player lost his lunch during a solo. Pretty spectacular.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 06, 2004 - 09:58 am:   

Has anybody sene BENJAMEN SMOKE? If ever there was outsider rock, this qualifies. Benjamen, a Georgia boy now deceased, was a speed-freak, occasional drag queen, singer-lyricist, renegade poet who lived on the fringes and played with and amazing band called Smoke. This documentary follows his life over the course of ten years and it's quite an astonishing document. I usually don't recommend rock DVDs, but this is way more than a rock DVD, though the music is terrific. Appearances by Patty Smith, Vic Chestnutt, Cat Power. Seriously worth checking out. I promise.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 05:19 am:   

that's a cool bukowski story lucius. would've been worth seeing, i think.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 06:52 am:   

Yeah, I own Benjamin Smoke. The director Jem Cohen, is an old friend of mine from the 1980s, a really talented guy. The downside of Smoke was that I was unable to find much of the guy's music, even after the film whetted my appetite for it. If you haven't seen Jem's Fugazi documentary, Instrument, I highly recommend that, as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 06:56 am:   

Well, ben, watching the guy puke was...well, like watching a guy puke; but watching th academics react was pretty great. Buk basically did his business with the piano, wiped his mouth and chin, then stepped to the mike and started to read. Guess he'd had practice.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 06:59 am:   

Yeah, I checked around on the net for more Smoke. Nada. Too bad. That was a band and a half. THe song that opens the DVD is killer...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 06:45 pm:   

hey, lucius, was his reading any good?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 06:53 pm:   

Bukowski? Yeah, I mean, people seemed to like it. He didn't piss himself or anything. He was pretty drunk, but he read fairly clearly, and received applause, then excused himself from the cocktail party afterward and, I assume, hit a real bar.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 03:49 am:   

i always wanted to check out a bukowski reading, though i came too his stuff much too late for that. but i scored a cd of one of his readings, 'hostage', i think, where he starts relatively sober and gets more drunk and abusive towards the audience, in an amusing way, and it seemed a bit of a shame never to have seen it live.

ah well. never actually wanted to meet the man, though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 05:31 am:   

I noticed no audience trashing -- but then the puking may have weakened him. Also he had no booze on stage -- I think the university had this rule, so that may have helped.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 11:59 am:   

OK, getting back to movies. When I took a break for lunch today I caught a plum of an oldie today on the tube -- Race With the Devil (Peter Fonda, Warren Oates, Loretta Swit? and voluminous red neck evil minions). Great, great chase scene with Winebago and evil minons in pickup trucks and cop cars.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

paulw
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 12:00 pm:   

Bukowski -- just saw the documentary yesterday. It doesn't have enough of the poetry or him reading the poetry, and it's a bit overlong, but on the whole worth seeing. A lot of snippets from other documentaries on Buk going back to the 70s made for various Euro-TV outfits. He can be pretty fucking funny, no question. And his poetry, of course, can really kick ass. If, like me, you find his peculiar drawling delivery irresistible, then it's worth the price of admission for that alone. "A good duker" he calls himself at one point, not without pride, referring to his rep in barroom brawls. I think that's a pretty good description of him as a poet, too.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 12:52 pm:   

Lucius, know anything about that movie called 'SAW' with Danny Glover and Cary Elwes? It has an 'interesting' trailer.

http://filmforce.ign.com/articles/521/521120p1.html?fromint=1

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 01:54 pm:   

Hi, JK...I heard about it making some buzz at the festival, that's all, but it seems to have good elements, the claustrophobic thing, the mysterious circumstance, that most Hwood horror films have forgotten how to use. Looking forward to it...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 07:13 am:   

JK -- talked to a couple of folks who saw SAW. Both gave it sorta ok reviews, basically saying it was smart for a serial killer movie, but it was still a serial killer movie, and, though clever, didn't break any new ground. I guess it's opening wide in September.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 10:48 am:   

I saw two good movies on DVD the other night.

OSAMA, which was beautiful and tragic. Comparable in theme with also beautiful and depressing BARAN, but set in Afghanistan rather than Iran.

I also watched BLACKBOARDS, by Samira Makhmalbaf, which I enjoyed a lot. Two Iranian teachers lugging blackboards around near the Iraq border; one falls in with a group of Kurds heading back to a village gassed by Saddam, the other joins a line of boys smuggling contraband. Fair bit of humor in this one. It's no MAROONED IN IRAQ, but still very good.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 11:49 am:   

Hey Lucius, have you seen SALVADOR, by Oliver Stone? I haven't seen it yet, but it covers the years you were in El Salvador (I think), so I was wondering what you thought of it.

I really want to see OSAMA.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 11:49 am:   

I've seen clips of B:LACKBOARDS, but not the movie. Loved OSAMA and BARAN.

On the other hand I saw I'M NOT SCARED, an Italian thriller with a big rep that, in my view, sucked massively. The pretentiousness of the camerawork made me crazy. Oh, look! A little forest creature. No, wait! It's a symbol of innocence. Blecch!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 11:54 am:   

Mahesh, Yeah, I saw it. Stone's best movie by a mile, in my opinion. And it definitely evokes the brimstone paranoia of that millieu. James Woods is fantastic in it and, amazingly enough, Jim Belushi's not too bad either.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 03:31 pm:   

Salvador is my favorite Stone picture too. Mainly because of Woods. In a way, it made a nice companion piece to Dog Soldiers.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 03:40 pm:   

I am a huge fan of Iranian cinema. The library in my area has a decent collection of videos and DVDs, and I'm still working my way through it. I have pretty much adored almost all of them. So far I have encountered only one so dry, pedantic and labored (i.e., not at all cinematic) that I couldn't watch it without skimming: The Hidden Half. Even with that one, I think it would be of interest to someone who is more interested in modern Iran's history than in modern Iran's cinema. Otherwise, it's all good.

I wonder if anyone knows the name of an Iranian film that made the festival circuit a couple years ago, concerning a director who couldn't get anything past the censors until he made a film about his own death?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 04:24 pm:   

Marc, By Dog Soldiers, do you mean Who'll Stop the Rain and not the Brit werewolf flick? I assume you do.

Mahesh, I believe I heard about that film, but don't know it offhand. Sorry.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 07:47 pm:   

Actually that was Marc who asked about the Iranian film that came out a couple years ago. :-)

But good to know you and Marc dug SALVADOR. It'll be the next one I rent. There's a really great independent DVD store downtown, across from Powells, called Watch This! Impressive selection. I rented FAR FROM HEAVEN, TUNES OF GLORY, and KUNDUN from it this past weekend, but they have all kinds of stuff there.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 09:23 pm:   

Oops. Sorry. Blurry-minded from work. Hope you enjoy SALVADOR...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 08:36 am:   

Yes, I meant the Robert Stone novel...I don't remember the movie ("Who'll Stop the Rain") very well, although I did dutifully watch it after reading the book...and haven't seen the werewolf version of Dog Soldiers. Hm. If Robert Stone wrote a werewolf novel...I think there's an anthology idea in there somewhere...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 08:52 am:   

The movie was badly edited, but it had its moments. Moriarity and Nolte were fine. Charles Haid was outstanding as Eddie Mars. And what's that guy, Richard....blanking on name. The heavyset guy who played the main guy who kidnaps Moriarity, he was good. And Tuesday Weld wasn't bad. It just got cut up in editing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 12:02 pm:   

Lucius:

Not surprised by SAW. The trailer reminded me of a short I saw on either the SciFi network or IFC in which a guy wakes up in a locked room, something terrible will happen if he can't get out, the key is hidden within a plastic Easter egg, but the eggs have been surgerically implanted under his skin and he needs to cut them out with a scalpel. The set up was that the guy who put the eggs under the skin of our protagonist had a daughter who died from accidentally swallowing one of the eggs.

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 12:48 pm:   

Mahesh, did you like FAR FROM HEAVEN? I'm a Haynes fan, but I thought FFH was rather silly and overrated.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 02:05 pm:   

Lucius, no problem; I get blurry-minded like that, too (to my fiancee's constant amusement).

Hi Dave, yeah, I pretty much agree with you. I was hoping for something (to use an overused term) subversive. I like what Haynes' ambition with it, and I'm usually a Julianne Moore fan, but with all the hype, I expected something more.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 02:08 pm:   

Jk, I'll still go see it, I guess. But I'm definitely less enthusiastic. The Easter egg short sounds...Daliesque, I guess....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 02:12 pm:   

Re: FFN. When I reviewed it, I said it felt as if Haynes wasn't so much directing as he was playing with dolls. If felt precious somehow. Probably the homage factor. Why anyone would want to do an homage to Douglas Sirk is beyond me...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 02:29 pm:   

It felt as though he expected the shock of injecting gay(!) and racial(!!) themes into a 1950s weepie would be a real jolt to the system. A very bad miscalculation. The movie fell flat for me. For those who really want to see what TH can do, I would recommend SAFE, one of my all-time favorites and a real Julianne Moore showcase. I thought FFH felt like a Carol Burnett sketch gone woefully wrong.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2004 - 02:35 pm:   

Yup. Safe remains Haynes masterpiece.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ellen
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 07:38 am:   

Oh man, I hated SAFE. I think it might have worked for me if the ending wasn't so obnoxiously precipitous. But after watching all that (and it seemed like hours and hours and hours) with no payoff I was just annoyed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 09:29 am:   

Yep. You've mentioned that before, E. I loved it, ending and all. Haven't much like anything he's done since.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 10:28 am:   

Safe is one of those movies that divides the world in two, I guess. I was given a copy from someone who had provided me dozens of wonderful movies I'd never seen before. The same person who introduced me to Beat Takeshi, supplied old Mike Leigh tapes, hours and hours of Hammer Horror, "Doctor Petiot," countless great films. He gave me "Safe" with a big smile and the certainty I would love it. Well...you know where this is going.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ellen
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 11:26 am:   

I went to see it with Pat Cadigan and we came out of it looking at each other and saying "well, we just wasted 2 hours."

I'm not wild about any of his work except for Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story. I didn't like Poison all that much, and thought The Velvet Goldmine ok, except for the sf crap thrown in. Far From Heaven was also not bad but mostly because of the acting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 12:02 pm:   

Different strokes....

just wasted two hours, huh? But you didn't feel that way after Amistad?
:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ellen
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 07:17 pm:   

Nope :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 07:37 pm:   

Well. I hear tell some folks did.... ;)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Joseph Adams
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 07:47 pm:   

Was it here that someone mentioned RABBIT PROOF FENCE? That's a damn good movie. But how the hell did the director of SLIVER and the pilot of TRU CALLING manage to make a fine film like this?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 07:55 pm:   

Phillip Noyce began his career in Austrailia making good little movies. Then, as happens to so many foreign directors, he was approached by Hollywood, brought over to the States and co-opted. His recent work shows that, unlike most of his fellows, Noyce has decided that he has enough money and has gone back to making good little films. Not only did he make FENCE, he also directed THE QUIET AMERICAN, which is, IMO, even better.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 08:23 pm:   

I saw two recently that were pretty good. Well, one and a half. Bubba Ho-Tep, which has a great performance by Bruce Campbell as an old doddering Elvis and a great Elvis/Elvis impersonator storyline. Nice turn by Ossie Davis as JFK also. The first half is great, really funny. It gets a little hokey at the end, though. More so than it's trying for. Still, definitely worthwhile.
Also saw a good portion of The Good Thief which interested me quite a bit. With a really sandbagged Nick Nolte. Still, I thought he was good in it. The story is caper fare, but I was digging the plot up until I had to split. Anybody see the whole thing?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 08:39 pm:   

I loved Bubba Ho-tep and Cambell. I thought the Good Thief was good, but it wasn't up to Bob Le Flambeau, which Thief was a remake of. But I did see the whole thing. Why?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 08:44 pm:   

I loved Bubba Ho-tep and Cambell. I thought the Good Thief was good, but it wasn't up to Bob Le Flambeau, which Thief was a remake of. But I did see the whole thing. Why?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 08:46 pm:   

Was wondering if it was worth finding again and checking all the way through. Like does the caper part pay off? I got up to the part where the twins show up. No specifics, just a thumbs up or down. I liked the characters quite a bit. Didn't know it was a remake. Maybe I should go for the original.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 08:48 pm:   

Oops. Posted twice. One more thing, Jeff. If you liked ThIef, you should really see Bob le Flambeau (I think I'm spelling it wrong) and, if you haven't seen them already, some other films by the director Jean Pierre Melville. I'd recommend Le Samourai with Alan Delon and Melville's film of a Jean Cocteau novel, Les Enfants Terrible. He made some of the best movies of the French new wave...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 08:55 pm:   

Oh, yeah! Go for the original. It's a better movie. The character or Bob is lot cooler (as in disengaged) than the Nolte performance. But Melivlle was a terrric director. Le Samourai is another crime film. Very good. Thief's worthwhile. It's a credible remake. I just think the character of Bob work better as a Frenchman, he's not as cuddly as Nolte's criminal (I'm speaking relatively), and the atmosphere and tension are better handled as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 09:23 pm:   

Lucius: Thanks. I'll put em on the list. Just recently read that Godard biography that Faber put out. I was really into that whole New Wave thing when I first started really looking at movies back in the early late 70's. Never did Melville, though. Something to look forward to.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 09:29 pm:   

Lucius: Actually, the Godard book is from Farrar Strauss Giroux, by Colin McCabe. It just looks like one of those Faber film books. A lot of nifty reading in it, but after a while my interest flagged though I saw it through to the end. Great stuff on Breathless and all those early NW flicks, great shots of Jean Seberg, and stuff on what a nut job Palance was. If you're thinking of getting it, I'd wait for the PB.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 09:50 pm:   

Jeff, I think Bob le Whatever is as strong as Breathless. Terrific movie. I'll check out the book. Godard's one of my guys. Alphaville just killed me. What a hoot! Have you ever seen Wages of Fear? It' s one my favorite movies of that period. One of the first real action pictures. Incredible b&w cinematography. Starring Yves Montand. About these guys transporting nitro over very bad roads in a nameless Latin American country. Friedkin remade it over here as Sorceror, and didn't do a bad job. But Wages of Fear is the shit.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 10:07 pm:   

got to agree with THE QUIET AMERICAN. cool film. totally worth seeing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 10:29 pm:   

Lucius: I've seen Alphaville, which really blew my mind when I saw it a long time ago. I was amazed at what the film could evoke, the sense of fantasy, with so little. Eddie Constantine (?) that guy was great in it. I think I read in the bio that Goddard did another Lemme Caution flick. Is that right? Haven't seen Wages but I've heard a lot about it. Saw the Friedkin flick, I think Roy Scheider was in it, many years ago, but remember thinking then, what a cool concept -- nitro on crappy mountain roads. Something my brother and I might have dreamed up when we were kids. Like so many of the best plots -- its just perfectly and beautifully simple. I'll put Wages on the list.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 10:32 pm:   

The guy who did the cinematography for both TQA and FENCE, Christopher Doyle, is a genius. He's Wang Kar Wai's cinematographer (cinematography is usually the best feature of Wang Kar Wai's films) and he just did the cinematography for a great Thai movie, Last Life in the Universe. The guy never missed. He's awesome.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 10:39 pm:   

Yup, Jeff. Eddie Constantine IS Lemmy Caution. I don;t know about a second Lemmy film. If so, I bet it would have come before Alphaville. Alphaville was Godard getting fed up with studio gigs and saying fuck it! When people ask me what's wrong with movies, I direct them to Alphaville, and in particular the scene when Lemmy is driving on a bridge over the Seine and Godard succeeds in persuading you that he's flying through outer space. You don't need big fucking budgets. And yeah, Roy Scheider was the main guy in Sorceror, But Wages...whoa. The B&W photography is so great, you think the world should have been black and white. Yves Montand and Georges Vanel are fantastic. It's perfect.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

S. Hamm
Posted on Saturday, June 19, 2004 - 08:25 pm:   

Lemmy Caution originated in a series of cheesy novels by Peter Cheyney, and was an established (fading?) movie franchise when Godard appropriated him for Alphaville. Eddie C. had starred in eight or ten Lemmy vehicles over the course of the previous decade-plus; all were French productions, and a couple of them got an American release, but none of them made a splash over here. And Godard never made a followup -- in fact, Alphaville effectively killed off the series, although I think French TV pulled Eddie out of the cryotank for a "Return of Lemmy" around 1990.

Must also forewarn Jeffrey to stick with Wages of Fear past the first hour, which is full of locally-colorful hot-blooded peasants who seem to be auditioning for a Steinbeck adaptation over at M-G-M. Once the boys climb into the trucks, however, it's a stone masterpiece.

I never got Melville. Someone please explain.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 19, 2004 - 09:36 pm:   

Jeez, I like the locally colorful hot-blooded peasants. But then those are my people.

You didn't like Bob and Le Samourai? I don't know. What's not to get? I saw Le Sam first back in the 70s and I liked it. Maybe I just like that ol' time religion bettern' you. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 08:50 am:   

Sam---

Have you seen the restored WAGES OF FEAR? I haven't seen it, but I'm told that it includes fifteen or twenty _more_ minutes in the opening section that emphasize some homosexual implications in the story. I've always been curious about it, but not so much so that I can push myself to sit through that opening section again.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 09:06 am:   

By the way, I noticed that someone asked about Michael Madsen's poetry. I have a copy of BURNING IN PARADISE here. Here's a sample of MM's verse plucked randomly:

GOOD-BYE

The first time I had sex
with a woman
I was 13 years old.
Her name was Jackie.
She said she was 28.
It wasn't only me
she fucked but
all my friends too.
Of course I brought
them over there but
only because they
didn't believe me.
And we all needed
to get laid you know.
Jeff, Danny, Tim, David
all got Coca-Colas
waiting for Jackie
in the white hallway.

She was married
and told us,
so we waited one day
and watched her
husband come home,
getting out of his car
and walking up the sidewalk.

All he saw was five boys
sitting on the roof
of the building watching
him waddle up.

The sad Christmas tree,
the dirty dishes in the sink,
Jackie's laundry and
broken tape deck.
THE FLINTSTONES on TV
while we sucked her tits
and she took us
one after another.

We heard she was moving
and watched from the roof
when they loaded the U-Haul,
finally driving away
she looked back up
and waved good-bye.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 09:18 am:   

The Criterion Collection disc offers the original 2 and a half hour version. I don't know if that's what you mean, since I never saw the film in the theater, so I can't distinguish between it and any other version. I own it and like it, even the first hour.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 09:21 am:   

As for the Madsen, yeah, that's pretty much it. You have a copy of the book. Wow. What's that mean? The amazing thing is, he won an award for it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 09:59 am:   

Lucius---

I bought the book in a thrift shop in Manhattan. Ever since I was given some of Charlie Sheen's finest verse, I've had an interest in celebrity poetry.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 10:45 am:   

Gee, I missed Charlie's ouvre. Bet it's swell.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 10:56 am:   

Lucius---

I'm pretty sure I showed it to you. I'll have to dig it out again. I think he never found a publisher for it (shockingly!) and self-published it in a small press run. I'll see if I can find one to quote here. I think one was called "My Truck Broke Down."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 11:21 am:   

Maybe you did show it to me. "My Truck Broke Down"....Most excellent. I expect trauma, angst, et al...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 01:20 pm:   

Lucius---

I found the Sheen poems. Does this sound familiar?

A GOAT IN MY ASS

There's a goat in my ass,
Living mainly on grass.
They say the creature was stolen,
Yet he feeds on my colon.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 02:46 pm:   

Oh yeah! Classic Sheen. He's no Madsen, but you gotta ask yourself, why couldn't he find a publisher?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ellen
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 06:43 pm:   

Back to movies. I visited a friend Friday night and we watched Jo-An 2 (I think that's the spelling) in video, a very creepy cursed house movie from Japan that has been remade a few times already. There's Jo-An 1 and 2 in video and Jo-An 1 and 2 on film.

And last night I finally watch Intacto, which Lucius recommended. Love it. I had my doubts at first because I found the beginnint confusing but once I realized what was going on I loved it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 08:09 pm:   

Haven't seen Jo an 1 or 2, but I've seen them for sale on line....Thanks for the rec.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Ford
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 09:10 pm:   

Sam & Lucius: Thanks for the info on Lemmy and for the hot blooded peasants warning. Possibly homosexual, hot blooded peasants with nitro on a bad moutnain road in an old truck. Holy Shinola! Turn down the lights and pass the DOTS.

Gordon: You should commission a poem from Sheen for an F&SF broadside to be sent out with every new subscription. Something maybe like "A Goat in My Ass On Mars." That Sheen is certifiable. Who did that guy's teeth? I see him sometimes on that West Wing and Charlie McCarthy's teeth looked less wooden. They look like they were made by Paul Revere (?).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 09:35 pm:   

Sorry, I was under the impression we were talking about Martin, not Charlie. Not that it matters much.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 07:07 am:   

i'm kinda surprised that celebrity poetry hasn't caught on more. i can just imagine a whole heap of people sitting around and discussing a new masden or sheen poem.

'that u-haul image,' they would say. 'it kinda puts it all into perspective for me.'
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 07:47 am:   

I am haunted by an image of Charlie Sheen, in a softly lit room, with perhaps some Nick Drake on the stereo, snifters of Courvoisier, tenderly romancing a smitten Denise Richards, a mss. of "A Goat in My Ass" in one hand and the pilot script for "Two and a Half Men" in the other.

Fellas, did you ever have one of those days when you felt you may have been barking up the wrong tree with this whole "culture" thing?

I think some small theater troupe should present a night of Celebrity Poetry, with dramatic readings of the great masters (Sheen, Madsen, Jimmy Stewart, etc.). I'd pay to see it. Hell, I'd bring a date...:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 07:54 am:   

What says it all to me is that non-celebrity poetry is that written by actual poets.

Jeff. I expect Charlie might charge a bit high for a commissioned poem, but I think it'd be possible to get Madsen for cheap.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 12:07 pm:   

Hey, all you left coasters...Michael Madsen will be reading from and signing copies of his new book in Borders, Westwood Blvd. in LA this Friday.

Man, you guys get all the luck...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 01:00 pm:   

I had a copy of the Sheen poems at one point...I think Gordon sent me a set. Masterful stuff. I was reciting some for memory recently at the Loew's Cinema, since one of their little celeb promos directly mentioned that Sheen wrote a book of poems entitled "A Peace of My Mind." There are probably a lot of kids who saw Harry Potter and Van Helsing who are now on the lookout for the Sheen book.

Wages of Fear is an amazing film. Saw it years ago in an art theater on Balboa Island. They ran Wages one week (along with Diabolique) and Sorcerer the next (along with Taxi Driver). I liked them both, but Wages was just incredible. I'm looking forward to watching the Criterion release. I remember thinking that Friedkin might have cast Roy Scheider because he looked a little like Yves Montand.

I'm getting all nostalgic thinking about how you used to be able to see two movies for one entry fee--and that was standard practice for first run movies. Damn it. People have no idea how their lives have been degraded.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 02:09 pm:   

Lucius, that would be a great separate thread:

DYING TRADITIONS: Things you remember from childhood that died out in your lifetime

Double features
Drive-in movies
Doctors' house calls
House-to-house trick-or-treating
Local kids' TV shows

Ahhh, memories...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 02:47 pm:   

If you guys want a thread like that, go for it. What I remember about my childhood isn't worth remembering. Well, not altogether...I really liked doing stupid shit that put me at risk, girls, and vandalism.

I could take each of your categories and list a major ass-bag experience involving them, particularly doctor's house calls and Drive-in movies. But that would get way too fucking morbid.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 02:52 pm:   

Marc---

The Charlie Sheen poems that I had were indeed from A PEACE OF MY MIND and the original book proposal dubbed him "The Brat Pack's Allen Ginsberg." I'm pretty sure that's the book he self-published. I'd love to see a copy of the actual book. It would make a great Ace Double published back-to-back with Heidi Fleiss's little black book.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 02:53 pm:   

Marc, yeah, get on that Criterion version. It's pretty great. I would bet you're right, that Friedkin saw Schieder and Montand as being the same type.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 - 12:25 pm:   

In the bookstore where I worked on Long Island, we kept a copy of the Poetry of Danielle Steele handy behind the counter, and read it aloud when there was nothing else to do. B&D was a recurrent theme.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 - 12:40 pm:   

That's just scary, man! Not that you read it, but that it exists. Whoa. Though the idea of Danielle tied up and thus unable to type has some appeal.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

S. Hamm
Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 - 11:09 pm:   

Gordon: Late to the WAGES party (sorry), but the version I have is the Criterion restoration from '91, which runs 2:27. Last time I saw the movie prior to that was c. 1980 at the late lamented Thalia on 96th (or was it 97th?), so my memory of the short version is too dim for me to tell you which homosexual elements were, uhh, reinserted. However, in the legendary Mexican cut (now thought lost), Montand has a goat in his ass and van Eyck, to his lasting regret, finds it. As a result the conflict between the two is considerably deepened.

Lucius: those weren't your people. Those were my people (e.g., Mme. Clouzot) trying to PASS as your people.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2004 - 05:01 am:   

Sammy, the way I figger, Georges-Henri (or is it Henri-George? Can'r recall) hadn't spent a great deal of time in Central or South America, so...I don't know. Maybe I'm more forgiving of such elaborations than you. I just file them away with the hundreds of other inaccurate portrayals, which includes those in almost every film relating to CA and SA ever made and, if the bulk of the movie's good, as is the case with WoF, hey, no biggie....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2004 - 05:03 am:   

Thread too long. Must start new thread. Will post last few messages on new thread.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register

| Moderators | Administrators |