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Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 01:56 pm:   

Still trying to get my hands on a copy of Worming the Harpy. Thought I'd had it several times, but no -- an elusive book, it is. Anyway, any further word on whether Prime will be reprinting it? If so, I may just give up my search for the Tartarus edition and wait for the reprint. . .
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des
Posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 02:06 pm:   

Na-na-na-NA-na! I have a copy of the Tartarus edition, which I treasure, signed for me by the author in 1995.
des
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Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 05:16 pm:   

I haven't found it yet for less than $300 that I don't have.
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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 04:05 am:   

I've just pitched the idea of a reprint of HARPY to Night Shade...

Fingers crossed!
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Jeff Nelson
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 02:23 pm:   

WOW! Three-Hundred for a copy now. I got mine about five years ago for around $50.
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Mastadge
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 06:02 pm:   

I finally snagged it for significantly less than $300 dollars.
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Rhys
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 06:01 am:   

Thank goodness for that... If you'd paid anything close to $300 for that one book I'd feel pretty bad about it...
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Ronan Pronost
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 01:28 am:   

I wouldn't want to boast, but I found a copy at an "almost" reasonnable price. I bought it from Fantasy Centre for £50 a couple of months ago. It had the doubtfull privilege of being(for a short time)the most expensive book I had ever bought, until I recently spent $100 for The Agonizing Resurrection of Victor Frankenstein and Other Gothic Tales by Thomas Ligotti (and THAT was a bargain at that price!).

Limited editions are nice, when you can buy them before they go out of print...
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Ronan Pronost
Posted on Monday, October 11, 2004 - 12:23 am:   

I'd just wanted to let you know that there is currently a copy of WORMING THE HARPY on f... e-bay
starting at £45 (no bidders yet).

Ronan

PS: I have no interest whatsoever in this sale, unfortunately...
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karl
Posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 - 11:08 am:   

It sold for $214.00
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Ronan Pronost
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 12:54 am:   

Wow! There still was no bidder when I last looked and there was only a couple of hours left...
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Rhys
Posted on Saturday, October 23, 2004 - 02:05 am:   

There's another Harpy for sale on e-bay for $10...
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karl
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2004 - 02:21 pm:   

This one sold for $215
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debt
Posted on Sunday, November 14, 2004 - 05:05 pm:   

Enjoyed reading your posts.

<p>debt</p>
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Stephen G
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2004 - 10:27 am:   

Hello Rhys, I was wondering whether there were any significant differences between the numbered and the lettered editions of WORMING THE HARPY.
I noticed that they originally sold at the same price according to the Tartarus website.
Any word on whether Nightshade may bite?
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HJ
Posted on Thursday, January 06, 2005 - 03:26 am:   

Worming the Harpy currently being sold on ebay.
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Rhys
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 02:39 am:   

Republication now looks increasingly likely, possibly even at the end of this year.

I can't make a definite statement at this stage. I'm currently tidying up the entire text before sending it to a publisher in the next few days and I'll post any relevant news here as it happens.
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des
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 06:50 am:   

Good news. That's great for the folk who haven't got the original (as I have!) des
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Rhys
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 07:06 am:   

Thanks Des.

I wasn't entirely happy with the editing job that was done on the first edition. A second edition gives me the chance to correct mistakes, make necessary changes and create the definitive version!
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des
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 07:48 am:   

I've got the definitive edition - but good luck!
des
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Rhys
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 02:51 am:   

No, the original is corrupt (only slightly corrupt but corrupt nonetheless!)

For instance, a crucial scene was edited out of the title story and there were lots of other small but sometimes very disruptive changes...

I've now restored the entire text to the way it should have been. One more example:

"...barges on a curry sauce river.."
is now:

"...bargees on a curry sauce river..."

The first version doesn't make sense and the joke doesn't work. In the second (and correct) version the joke has been restored! Amazing what a single letter 'e' can do!
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des
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 09:21 am:   

In which story does the 'barges on a curry sauce river' appear? I'd like to check that out and then make a 'transformational grammar' or 'disintentional' rationale for the original version being the correct one.
des

thanks, Rhys.
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Rhys
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 04:27 am:   

Ah, but Des, the incorrect version is not the original version. The original version is what I originally wrote -- the typo appeared during the printing stage.

'Transformational grammar' can fix its lips to my arse in a kiss!
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des
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 06:45 am:   

That's not a very 'Oulipo' statement!
How it's first published/printed for your readers is the original version.
Again - which story is it in? To save me searching the whole book.
des
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des
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 - 06:55 am:   

Still, I can re-read it, if pushed. I haven't read it since you signed it for me in 1995. I won't quote what you wrote for me, Rhys, when you signed it!
Your humble servant, DF Lewis


Actually, as a small print aside (if not a footnote), I find it hard not to feel sorry for the purchasers of the hardback 'Weirdmonger' (reprint of the paperback version), since I felt it expected of me to correct in it the odd typo or two. In hindsight, I can now see how and why those typos were printed and I now consider the paperback to be the original version and are very meaningful in the context.

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Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:31 am:   

Des: OuLiPo is about the {mathematics} of form. Any statement at all might be produced by OuLiPo techniques, including anti-OuLiPo statements.

However, translation is an interesting subject in itself. Which brings me to a forthcoming project of mine... THE MERMAID VARIATIONS. This concerns a book that will be translated and published in as many different languages as possible {but not in English}...

More on this as it happens. I've nearly finished writing the book in question. There's a good chance the first 'variation' will be a Portuguese translation entitled A Sereia de Curitiba... But this project is still at the early stages, so I can't say too much more.
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des
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 07:12 am:   

Re "...barges on a curry sauce river.." and "...bargees on a curry sauce river.." , I've still not yet been able to find this reference in the Worming The Harpy book.

I presume the respective senses of 'barges' (inanimate objects) and 'bargees' (people) are relevant to the context. But, judging by your story 'The Small Miracle', where you have Brothels (buildings) trooping along the riverside towards a church for Confession, I was wondering whether you are being oversensitive (or even mistaken) as to this so-called 'typo'.


More when I locate the context.
des



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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 08:22 am:   

He, he! Well I'm oversensitive, that's true, but you're right about the confusion between 'inanimate objects' and 'people' being my objection to that typo... But ultimately, bhajis are more fun on a curry sauce river than barges!

The sentence in question occurs in the story *Velocity Oranges* in the sub-chapter entitled 'Geiger Counter Revolutionary', I think.

I've racked my brains over what I wrote in your copy of the original book. It was almost ten years ago, but I think it was something to do with you being the "original harlequin" of my story *Arquebus for Harlequin*... Is that right? My memory used to be amazing but it's not as good as it was...
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des
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 08:59 am:   

Rhys, I had tried to avoid the bhaji/bargee joke, ever since I'd heard about the typo: but now you bring it to the fore.... there's no help for us.

Actually, I've now gone to the source (with your help), and I'm still happy with 'barges' rather than 'bargees', particularly in the masturbatory context.

According to Macaulay, a barge was a pleasure-boat (Cf. Handle's Firework music etc), as well as a conveyance of cargo.

Your inscription in my edition of the book:
"To Des, The original Harlequin, Rhys Hughes."

Memory well done!

des
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Rhys
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 01:19 am:   

> a barge was a pleasure-boat as well as a conveyance of cargo.

Yes, and a bargee is the operator of a barge!
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des
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 10:07 am:   

Shouldn't it be a 'barger' rather than a 'bargee'?

Cf: employer/employee.
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Luís
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 10:11 pm:   

If a bargee makes more sense being called a barger, then shouldn't the barge be a bargee?

Sorry to barge in the conversation. I hope I'm not barging up the wrong tree! Looking forward to the new _Harpy_ --- it's so rare, it's hard to find a good barge-gain nowadays! By the way, since Rhys made me a pirate in his stories, I must now admit to being a fan of Bargebarossa. Yes, I know: the puns just keep getting worse and worse. Some would say it's barge-barous.

Also, stop me if you heard this one: a priest, a rabbi and a horse come into a barge . . .
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Luís
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 10:17 pm:   

. . . and the bargee says, "What is this, a junk?"
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des
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 12:27 am:   

This is an excerpt from a collection of poems entitled 'The Damnation of Chris de Barge' by Rhys Hughes:

Parboiled monsters thrashed in their wake,
tender anger, curried despair,
textured with vegetables.
"My fans have preceded me," the passenger
wailed. "Carrots in the Styx!"
The bargee nodded solemnly. Perdition was
going to pot all round.
How I detest your mouth, he thought, your
diseased crooner's smug chin.
Never have I had such a feeling of complete
and utter revulsion: will I ever forget the
way you look tonight?



My bold,
Des
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Rhys
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 02:27 am:   

Des: do you so make so bold?

Luis: you weren't really a pirate but a sort of minstrel that plays for pirates, probably because you have no choice!
As well as yourself, I'm putting Joao Barreiros, Luis Filipe Silva and Safaa Dib in the story I'm currently writing, which is set partly on the moon and partly in Lisbon.
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des
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 09:27 am:   

The Welsh won the rugger this afternoon!
Woo-hoo!
des
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SB
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 01:40 pm:   

Rhys--Who might be republishing "Harpy"? I need to pre-order.
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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 05:02 pm:   

Probably Prime.
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Rhys
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 02:17 am:   

Des: yes winning the Grand Slam is an amazing achievement. But in the long run all that really matters is that we beat England again!

SB: thanks for your interest. Mastadge is right, it's going to be republished by Prime, sometime this year, not exactly sure when.

This second edition of HARPY contains 'The Forest Chapel Bell', a story that was originally intended for that collection but ended up being published in the TALES FROM TARTARUS anthology.
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des
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 06:52 am:   

Yes, Rhys, I was rooting for Wales on Saturday. A tremendous achievment after 27 years in the wilderness.

I'm half Welsh, half English (South Wales coal-mining stock and East End London docker stock), so I get the best of both worlds. ;-)

Llanelly (where my father comes from) is pronounced as 'Cthulhu' is. And 'Yhnthlei' appears in Innsmouth story.


Good luck with 'Prime' Worming.
des



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Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 02:01 am:   

I don't quite see how "Llanelli" sounds at all like "Cthulhu"... But then I was never much of a Lovecraft fan.

Talking about things Welsh, I recently bought the Fantasy Masterworks reissue of Evangeline Walton's MABINOGION.
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des
Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 07:31 am:   

I don't quite see how "Llanelli" sounds at all like "Cthulhu"... But then I was never much of a Lovecraft fan.
***********
Sorry, I meant the initial consonantal 'attack'.
I think you like HPL better than you say.

I've got the Mabinogion itself somewhere, I think.
Other great Welsh writer: Dylan Thomas (reminds me of you, Rhys, and I mean that as a compliment).

des


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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 02:28 am:   

No, I really don't like Lovecraft. Trust me on this one!

I love Clark Ashton Smith, though...
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 11:37 am:   

>>I love Clark Ashton Smith, though...

Hear hear. Wish there were more of us CAS lovers.
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des
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 12:03 pm:   

I love CAS ... and HPL!


Actually I've been reading CAS since the Sixties and have most of his stories.
Texture's the thing.
des
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 04:49 pm:   

I love CAS because of his prose and HPL despite it.
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des
Posted on Friday, March 25, 2005 - 12:20 am:   

Which makes HPL a greater writer. (He overcomes greater obstacles to become great - and his work is great whether one enjoys it or not).
des
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SB
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 01:01 pm:   

Rhys--thank you very much. I will contact the Prime publishers and secure a copy. I have the original from ebay auction last year in a lettered copy but would like all editons.

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