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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 04:24 pm:   

I don't mind the occasional trunk novel. If I like a writer, I'll read most everything they write until there's a preponderance of junk. One story of mine that I stuffed in a drawer and almost threw away a bunch of times because I hated it so much; I ended up conserving it, selling it, and it was the first thing of mine to get picked up for reprinting, so I guess people responded to it. If there are five other books as strong as The Road in McCarthy's trunk, then I'm happy. I read the book in about five hours, which could have been spent doing worse things.

I can certainly see your picture of it as an existential comic book. Some comix, I like.

I've got two more episodes of Oz to go. The final season has been the weakest...seems like it went on one season too long.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 07:08 pm:   

Actually, that pretty much says it all about the road. I was preparing to go page by page... :-)
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 10:21 pm:   

you know, despite the trunkness and that, i'm thinking of giving THE ROAD a look in. i've only read BLOOD MERIDAN of mccarthy's, and i got my on a couple of others, but THE ROAD doesn't sound too bad. i didn't feel any urge to read NO COUNTRY, however...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 06, 2006 - 03:51 am:   

By all means, read it. I think it may have been written around the time of BM -- it shares certain obsessions, at any rate. I found it written with a sort of weird relish, as if he were digging on the scenario. You can always find some trick to steal in McCarthy, which is basically why I read, but as a story...I thought it not depressing, but indulgent in the sense of being a book being written in a bitter mood, with a kind of I'll-show-em attitude. Then I think the Old Testament is a very spiteful book...
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PM
Posted on Friday, October 06, 2006 - 06:19 am:   

Watched Zahedi's I AM A SEX ADDICT. Lord, she has breasts! Funny and pathetic, and if one just goes with it fairly watchable.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 06, 2006 - 06:46 am:   

I just watched Richard Stanley's THE WHITE DARKNESS from the DUST DEVIL set. Definitely an interesting way to spend an hour. Lots of fascinating footage of Haitian voodoo rituals and some enlightening interview bits. The problem I had was the lack of exposition/narration in a film that really needed it. I suspect most people watching don't know much about voodoo, and would like the basic concepts explained a little so they have some context to understand what they are watching. Stanley seems to believe in pointing the camera and letting the images speak for themselves. I can respect that school of filmmaking, but I think this subject just cried out for background.

The film does take a sharp left turn midway through and becomes a film about U.S. religious imperialism. I'm not complaining because I thought it, too was interesting. The military "support" forces in Haiti, purportedly on a humanitarian mission, made no bones about the fact that they felt that Christianity was a foundation for democracy and that they were there to help spread the Baptist mission. I'm thinking "what the f*** is our taxpayer-funded military doing in a foreign country trying to make Baptists out of these people?" Thought-provoking, to say the least.
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PM
Posted on Friday, October 06, 2006 - 07:36 am:   

I would theorize that Stanley was unable to interpret what the voodooists were presenting. To what extent the voodooists were being forthcoming is unknown.

Whether this failure led to and/or Stanley became distracted and went off on a non-voodoo tangent is also unknown.

Clearly he was attempting to deceive everyone: the BBC who payed the bill, the US military, and the voodooists. Perhaps the audience as well...
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Huw
Posted on Friday, October 06, 2006 - 11:09 am:   

I'm looking forward to seeing The White Darkness (I just got my 5-disc Dust Devil yesterday), being interested in voudou (and Santeria, Candomble, Obeah, etc.). The last voudoun documentary I saw was Maya Deren's Divine Horsemen, and that's ancient.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 06, 2006 - 02:38 pm:   

Thanks for the report, Dave.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 01:57 pm:   

Checked out a really cool indie horror film over the weekend -- Head Trauma. It's a creepy ghost story, with hints of voodoo, that plays like Memento meets J-horror. Some of the acting is weak early on, but the script is really strong and the directing atmospheric. As far as recent horror films go, this has got to be one of the best.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 05:37 pm:   

Yeah, I watched that while waiting for the shuttle. Cool movie, and I still recommend the Last Broadcast.
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Huw
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 12:46 am:   

Has anyone seen London Voodoo? I don't think it's all that well-known; I found it by accident some time ago while browsing through the indie horror DVD section on amazon.com. I thought it did a pretty good job with its subject matter. Steve Severin (of the Banshees) did the soundtrack, if I remember correctly.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 03:03 am:   

Yep, I actually reviewed that one for FSF. Solid little movie.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 06:51 am:   

Watched Ellie Parker. Naomi Watts plays an aspiring actress. It was enjoyable for a while but I was ready for it to wrap up when it actually did...
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Huw
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 07:25 am:   

Great! I'll have to check out that review. I liked the film a lot. I'm no expert on the subject, but there seem to be few films that are actually accurate and faithful in their depiction of the beliefs and practises of voudou (ditto for Santeria, etc.).
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 07:44 am:   

I third London Voodoo.

Also checked out Spike Lee's Inside Man, a caper film that's constantly satirizing racial profiling and post-9/11 security procedures. The problem? All of Lee's characters, especially the hostages, are little more than caricatures, making it impossible to empahtize with their plight. And, to top it off, the ending drags and drags. Sadly, this is one of the best reviewed American movies of the year. I'll be checking out Scorsese's The Departed this weekend, another well-reviewed crime film. I'm hoping for better than Inside Man.
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Huw
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 08:06 am:   

Yeah, Inside Man struck me as kind of hollow. The Departed is based on the Hong Kong Infernal Affairs films, isn't it?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 08:16 am:   

The Departed is based on Infernal Affairs, which I saw and liked. Having seen the preview of Departed, you wouldn't catch me dead at a screening. Matt Damon and DiCaprio for Andy Lau and Tony Leung? Throw in Marky Mark and a Jack Nicholoson doing rizzled...Forget it. Scorcese hasn't made a decent flick since the pre-Cambrian.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 10:15 am:   

LONDON VOODOO is one of the better scare movies I've seen. Can't recall her name, but the woman who played the wife was outstanding; the scene where she pees in the soup at the dinner party is worth the price of admission alone. No real speed bumps here; two thumbs way up.

DUST DEVIL was terrific, although I thought the guy who played him could have been scarier.

What bugged me about THE DEPARTED, aside from a babe psychologist who doesn't seem to think it's much of a conflict to bed down with any cute patient, is that they made so much of the racy strap-on sex scene with Nicholson and then chopped it out of the movie. How much you wanna bet it's "restored" to the "director's cut" just in time for us to buy it on DVD?
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 11:01 am:   

"I'm hoping for better than Inside Man."

When it comes to Hollywood, you're more hopeful than I.

"How much you wanna bet it's "restored" to the "director's cut" just in time for us to buy it on DVD?"

Sounds like a marketing plan to me...perhaps the deluxe package will even include a strap-on.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 11:15 am:   

I guess I've been oblivious - I heard nothing about a racy scene from Departed, but after hearing it was a remake of Infernale Affairs, I completely ignored everything about it. IA was good, but I don't need a remake of it by a director who hasn't done good work in years and a cast of dull actors (including Nicholson, who has been simply cashing in on name recognition for a long time...The Pledge being the only decent thing he's done possibly since 1980).
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 11:19 am:   

Amen!

The Pledge was great--I wish Nicholson would do more smaller pictures.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 11:46 am:   

Enjoyed the Pledge.

About Schmidt had some moments as well but too much kookout factor.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 11:55 am:   

THE DEPARTED wasn't bad, just very convoluted. I don't think the screenwriter did a very good job of explaining the story clearly. Lots of loose ends...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 12:05 pm:   

"Wasn't bad" is no recommendation.

Infernal Affairs was very good.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 01:39 pm:   

I didn't watch About Schmidt, but the Nicholson movies I have seen have been pretty bad (As Good as It Gets, Mars Attacks, Wolf, Two Jakes, A Few Good Men, Batman, Witches of Eastwick). I liked Batman when I was in junior high, but watching it now, his performance is painful.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 01:59 pm:   

I not only wish Nicholson would return to smaller pictures, but Scorsese too. I'd love to see him tackle another MEAN STREETS/TAXI DRIVER/RAGING BULL size project. Alas -- not gonna happen.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 02:10 pm:   

The nice thing about The Pledge is that Nicholson wasn't playing "Jack," the gleeful, graying roue with a cynical wit and a playfully nasty streak. In DEPARTED, he is The Joker-as-druggy-Irish-scumbag. Fun to watch, but you sense that this is milk money for Nicholson at this point.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 02:17 pm:   

Another movie Nicholson was good in...THE CROSSING GUARD.

You can trace his decline from "Here's...JOHNNY!"
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 02:21 pm:   

Well, Kelly, he did the Pledge....so there's hope.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 02:24 pm:   

It's been all downhill since THE TERROR.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 02:55 pm:   

You mean for Nicholson, the world, or you personally...?
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 04:06 pm:   

Scorsese didn't do the Pledge, but Senn Peann (who also directed the Crossing Guard).
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 04:39 pm:   

Kelly I meant Nichoson did the pledge, not Scorcsese.

As far as the Crossing Guard goes, I'm not a fan of that film. I prefer The Indian Runner to CG.
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 05:47 pm:   

The Terror? I thought it was all downhill for him since he guested on The Andy Griffith Show. :-)
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 09:08 pm:   

I read that Scorcese is so paranoid he keeps a mirror on the camera when he's directing, so he can see everyone who's standing behind him.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 10:12 pm:   

i like CROSSING GUARD, tho i dont think it works at the end. THE PLEDGE is a whole lot better, tho, and it makes me wish penn would direct more films, and nicholson do more interesting parts.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 10:15 pm:   

but that said, i think i am up for THE DEPARTED. haven't seen INTERNAL AFFAIRS, tho, but at the moment, that film looks like a beacon of light in the cinemas...

i liked scorcese's BRINGING OUT THE DEAD, btw. after that nothing has been too good, but i'm willing to give this a go.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 10:26 pm:   

So Scorcese's a paranoid, huh? Good.

I don't think Scorsese's done anything worth my time since Mean Streets. Taxi Driver was B picture, and the rest....yuck.

As for the Departed, Damon and DiCaprio are too much for me.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 06:33 am:   

I heard that Scorsese actually hires "walkers," interns whose job it is to walk and talk with him when he is on the street, to shield him from passersby who might want a word.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 06:51 am:   

Now there's an idea for a movie...
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 07:51 am:   

Adds a new dimension to the scene in THE KING OF COMEDY where the fan approaches Jerry Lewis, who is in a hurry, on the street and when his request for a moment of his time is denied, screams "Cancer! You should get cancer!"
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 07:53 am:   

Last word on THE DEPARTED (or, next to last, I would suspect)...Mark Wahlberg is actually pretty good, although the role is a scene-stealer's wet dream.
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 10:41 am:   

"Scorsese actually hires walkers"

Sure why not. When one is living one's daily life there shouldn't be any obligation to indulge strangers.

...and DiCaprio was wonderful in CELEBRITY.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 01:54 pm:   

PM, I'm sorry, Mr. G. is very busy. Does he know you?

--Dave G.'s Online Retort Responder
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 04:12 pm:   

Please hold while I contact PM.

--PM's "Message Bearer"
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 04:55 pm:   

Can my cyberpeople call your cyberpeople?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 05:06 pm:   

can my cyberassassin contact your cybervictim... ? :-)'


If I had a koala, I'd file its teeth and name it Funnky KBear...
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 06:45 pm:   

"Can my cyberpeople call your cyberpeople?"

Sure. In cyberspace anyone can do anything...even play with a Funnky KBear. Probably beats a Funky Winkerbean...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 07:06 am:   

I'm getting closer to kicking my Lost addiction. The first two episodes this season have done nothing for me. The last five minutes of this one were the best part (where the leader reveals he's spent his entire life on the island and they are in contact with the outside world). I give them until the end of the six episode mini-season to re-hook me.

Dust Devil arrived last night, but I haven't had time to watch the documentaries yet.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 07:22 am:   

"I'm getting closer to kicking my Lost addiction."


Yessss...Join us. ;)
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PM
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 09:25 am:   

Still thinkin' 'bout koalas.

Koala as film critic.

Licks the leaf: film is ok.
Eats the leaf: film is fantastic.
Leaves the leaf: indifferent.
Refuses the leaf: film is bad.
Spits up the leaf: film is worse.
Bites the hand of the human handler: everyone's fucked.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 11:23 am:   

There has got to be a screenplay out there somewhere with the title "Lick the Leaf."

I will regale you all with a review of the horror film CALVAIRE next week. My order just came in!
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 02:06 pm:   

They'll probably give you an episode that stirs you up again, then go back to business as usual. They're going to keep slipping you flashback after flashback til you're ready to quit, then give yoiu a hot episode ad infitum.

Calvaire's pretty cool, but too short I thought.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 03:33 pm:   

I'm sure Lucius is right, they'll give us a little bit of something, and then it will be back to pointless flashbacks. They need to cut the flashbacks. Unless they start changing things, they will loose their audience, and the network won't let them change things.
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Mikal Trimm
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 04:39 pm:   

You should all stop watching 'Lost' and start watching 'Studio 60'. That's where all the real writing is these days...
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 04:45 pm:   

My Battlestar Galactica season 2.5 DVD boxset just arrived. Now that Carnivale's off the air, that's where my money's at.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 04:54 pm:   

".....Studio 60..."

it sure as hell ain't where the acting's at....
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 05:16 pm:   

i left LOST cause of those backflashes and i feel good. i can run further. jump higher. hunt and kill my own food. i'm manly.

anyhow, jus' saying.

:-)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 08:02 pm:   

Studio 60...I don't want to watch another show about Hollywood, there are far too many of them and I never cared for them.

The only current show that hasn't been disappointing me is My Name is Earl.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 08:22 am:   

My Name is Earl has great writing and great cameos, like Timothy Olyphant from Deadwood as the gearhead Earl beats in a drag race. Good stuff.

Haven't seen Studio 60, but I always found West Wing stuffy and self-important. When people start writing shows about themselves, the results are usually bad.

Watched CALVAIRE (Ordeal) last night. I think I could recommend it to fans of horror and the horrible. Androgynous cabaret singer Marc Stevens, who seems a magnet for the libidinous attachments of freaks, veers off the road in his van and ends up stranded at Auberge Bartel, an inn run by a lonely widower who misses his lover, also a singer. I think you get the general idea. But director-scenarist Fabrice du Welz embroiders the story with gruesome details and sets it in a village-of-the-living-dead full of guys who make the DELIVERANCE crew look like the Yale Whiffenpoofs. The tavern dance party is priceless. The whole thing plays like a twisted Belgian homage to David Lynch. Fun, in a sadistic, hypercruel kind of way.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 09:50 am:   

Dave: CALVAIRE sounds like the kind of film Rob Zombie wishes he could make. I'll have to check it out when I'm in the mood for something nasty.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 11:06 am:   

And yet, it's never gratuitously gory. Sadistic, yes, but never gory.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 01:03 pm:   

But, I repeat, it feels truncated.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 07:44 am:   

Saw DEPARTED last night. Like INSIDE MAN, it's a watchable though extremely flawed filmed, and a far cry from INFERNAL AFFAIRS. By the end, you realize that Scorsese couldn't give a damn about his characters -- black comedy and irony rule the day, as he wants to make a comment about over-sexed, ultra-violent men (it doesn't matter if you're a cop, criminal, or clergyman). The best part of the movie is probably DiCaprio's performance (in the Tony Leung role), as a twitchy under-cover cop without family or friend. On the other hand, Matt Damon is flat-out awful -- stolid, uncharasmatic. In fact, all of the actors, from Alec Baldwin, Marky Mark, big Jack, all seem to be acting in their own movie, having a run of the set without much direction. Sadly, it's one of the best Hollywood movies of the year. Very sad, indeed.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 08:06 am:   

Name a movie in which Matt Damon is not flat awful. You may win a prize... :-)
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Laird Barron
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 08:33 am:   

The Talented Mr. Ripley. I think he made a credible sociopath.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 08:37 am:   

Really? Well, I would have much preferred he and Jude Law switch roles, because I thought he was, well, flat awful. Malkovich showed how the role should be played in Ripley's game a few years later. But perhaps you saw something I didn't.
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Laird Barron
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 08:52 am:   

I'd been researching violent pathological behavior when I caught the flick (I wasn't familiar the premise of the film). Damon's handling of the sociopathic methodology struck a chord.

I'll have to catch Ripley's Game.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 08:56 am:   

Ripley's Game not a great movie, but it has a couple of great performances, and seeing Malkovich onscreen with Ray WInstone gave me a charge, though Winstone isn't given much to do....
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jk
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 11:45 am:   

Yeah, Ripley's Game was pretty good, strange it went straight to video. Lucius, have you heard of Klimt, the new movie about the painter, with Malkovich? It's supposed to be a "flashback phantasmagoria created from his morphine-addled deathbed visions." Hmm...that could mean pretentious crap.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 04:05 pm:   

I've read a couple of middling reviews, and the director, Ruiz?, has a good rep in France, but I don't know. I'll probably see it--I like films about painters, even though I don't like painters. Go figure.
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ben peek
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 05:26 pm:   

i saw THE DEPARTED. why'd i do that? the whole thing is just a flat, styless film with matt damon and leonard dicaprio putting on accents. you wouldn't even recognise it as a scorcese film, if you didn't know from the start.

ray winstone is completely wasted, too.

i thought RIPLEY'S GAME was okay.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 07:49 pm:   

Ripley's Game wasn't a great movie, mainly because of Doughray Scott's weak performance, but it did have a real good psycho by Malkovich...at least one more faitful to the book. But the best psycho criminal I've seen lately was Paul Bettany in Gangster No 1. If you dig that kind of thing, check it out.
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 09:31 pm:   

Yeah, THE DEPARTED was almost totally lacking in things that made me know I was watching a Scorsese movie. The social subtext was amateurishly presented: The "Beacon" of America compromised and corrupted, riddled with rats all ratting each other out, references to the Patriot Act dutifully trotted out, the final image just rubbing our faces in it in case we missed the point. I was going to say Symbolism 101, but it's more like elementary school. I thought Leo D did well with the part he was given.

I liked Malkovich in that version of Ripley, enjoyed the classic bit on the train, strongly disliked the rest of it. And that was one of my favorite Ripley Books.

I've got THE PROPOSITION here.
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ben peek
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 09:40 pm:   

what're the books like, btw? i've never read them.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 10:37 pm:   

It's drunk here, but what the hell. Will someone tell me what's so great about Scorsese? More to the point, what's a Scorcese film? I haven't thought much of him since Mean Streets. After Hours was kinda funny, but nothing that hasn't been done better. Goodfellas was Mean Streets lite. Taxi Driver was a potboiler, cliche after cliche, the crazed Vietnam vet, the portrait of liberal politics, etc. What separates it from most of his other films is that the camera work has some energy. Raging Bull, a bloated, completely unrealistic portrait of LaMotta--except for his comedy stuff. Again, the cinematography was pretty good...though the actual boxing scenes were appallingly bad. Casino...please! Notable only for the most excessive use of voiceover in human history. Gangs of New York, except for Day-Lewis, a joke. That horrible period piece with Winona Rider and Day-Lewis...Yech! The ever-hideous Nick Cage in that movie about the EMT people. I'm sure I'm missing something, but those cover the body of his career. IMO, he's got the resume of a typical Hollywood director. To my way of thinking, the pedictable character of his work is not good and a Scorcese film is exactly as Ben and Marc describe the Departed - flat, with amateurish attempts at subtext and symbolism, typified for the most part by lousy acting or, in the case of Joe Pecsi, overacting. In most of his films, the cinematography is by the numbers. Flat, styleless. I don't see a great director, I see a glorified Hollywood hack.
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 11:32 pm:   

What I was hoping for from THE DEPARTED was enough cinematic energy to have justified seeing it on the big screen. I didn't find anything of the sort. Needless to say, I have gotten this buzz plenty of times previously from Scorsese movies, and not in the instantly familiar and forgettable mode I associate with Hollywood hacks. Of course, the nature of movies is such that one can often remember the explosions of crap just as vividly as moments of real power, so that's not necessarily an indication that he's not a Hollywood hack, just that I enjoy his films often enough to keep going back to them even when I find the general subject matter unpromising. Unlike, say, Ridley Scott films, where it will take a lot of promotional cajoling to convince me to give it a chance, and I need to see some swords or spaceships before I plunk down for a ticket.

Rather than argue about Scorsese, since I'm not going to change anyone's mind on the matter, and don't particularly feel like trying considering the recent ones haven't done much for me, I think we can all agree the Ripley books are great. Except for the last one. The only bad thing is that you might be tainted by having seen a bunch of recent movie adaptations. When I read them, the only Ripley movie extant was Wim Wenders's THE AMERICAN FRIEND, which was sufficiently unlike the books as to be easily separable from them.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 11:36 pm:   

Saw Lucky#Slevin. Didn't think it was so hot. What's really strange though is that O Yuki Conjugate have a song on the soundtrack, and one of the guys in the band, Andrew Hulme, is also listed as Editor and Second Unit Director on Lucky#Slevin. Have you heard them Lucius? Paul Schutze produced one of their albums. It's really cool fourth-world ambient, Eno-type stuff, but very underground. The new cd just came out, first in ten years, and it's a limited edition of one thousand. Guess he's not too concerned with getting his music to a large audience.
Oh well, if Graeme Revell from industrial noise group SPK can go on to lounge beside a pool in Hollywood as a prolific film composer I guess it's not too strange.
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PM
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 05:33 am:   

Slevin was dull.

Maybe one day Scorcese will stop with all the gang movies...last temptation of --- Christ, and Lucius should have to watch the Departed so he can contribute his brain matter splatter with all the other unfortunate viewers.

We see these over and over I suppose as folk want to see Scorch gangbang and Jack do those funny faces over and over neverending...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 06:05 am:   

I skipped Lucy Slevin, but have heard O Yuli Conjugate. Liked it. Would like to hear the Schutze album. Yeah, it's hardly surprising these guys drift to Hollywood -- maybe it gives them the opportunity to be uncompromising with their own music.


Marc, I like the books all right. Ripley's a good character and they're very readable.
.
As far as RScott goes, well, he's made 2 good movies, which is one more than Scorcese in my book. I wasn't looking for an argument, rather I was looking for someone to point out something I was missing. Obviously, it's an undefinable something. I'll have to go back and take a look at his Corman film. There may be a clue visible in the raw state of such a movie.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 07:16 am:   

I think Scorsese's films represent the film-school ideal of "pure cinema" -- forever referencial of film history; impeccable camera work; trend-setting use of pop music; etc., etc. We -- the film-going public -- have forgiven Scorsese his storytelling and character flaws throughout the years because of these things, which provide a rush for the audience. GOODFELLAS, if nothing else, is a bolt of cinematic adrenaline.

However, of late, AVIATOR and DEPARTED do not even succeed on these superficial fronts. His use of music in DEPARTED, except for that Irish punk song, was uninspired. And, as everyone else pointed out, so was his camera work.

On the other hand, I'll continue to check out Scorsese's films in the theater. He's one of the only American film-makers, even on his floundering days, who even offers the potential of something wonderful.
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Huw
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 07:29 am:   

Was Comfortably Numb on the soundtrack, Kelly? I'm sure I heard it on the tiny bit of the trailer I saw.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 07:32 am:   

Huw: Yeah, it was. As was "Gimme shelter," about fifty times.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 09:06 am:   

Well, I've never been able to forgive him. Or, better said, I've never been able to reconcile his one-time talent with the desultory, slovenly narratives he engaged. The B-movie rush I got from Taxi Driver (which I liked well enough) was cool, but when I heard people saying it was a great movie, I couldn't fucking believe it. Anyway, it was downhill for me after that. Goodfellas just didn't do it for me. It was a cool story, I just think he missied by a few degrees.

Anyway, thanks, Kelly. I understand what you're saying, even though I don't grok it. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:36 am:   

I don't understand Scorsese's needless recycling of ideas. How many times do we need to hear vintage Stones on a s/t? I mean, a guy like that must have access to every band on the planet. Why use the same tunes over and over? Does he consider it like a trademark or something?

FWIW, I enjoyed BRINGING OUT THE DEAD for Ving Rhames and Tom Sizemore.
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jk
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 05:36 pm:   

Is Gimme Shelter on the soundtrack of The Departed? After he already used it on Goodfellas?
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PM
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 08:30 pm:   

Well I'll give Scorchy some love for Life Lessons. Procul Harem probably appreciates it too.
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S. Hamm
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 08:54 pm:   

Marky Marc! AMERICAN FRIEND was "the only Ripley movie extant"? The hell you say! What's Rene Clement's PLEIN SOLEIL (PURPLE NOON) -- foie coupé?

I'm still trying to track down somebody, anybody, who's seen the long-shelved RIPLEY UNDER GROUND, which sports a Westlake screenplay. Cast includes Tom Wilkinson, Willem Dafoe, Alan Cumming, and Ian Hart, with Barry Pepper (alas) as Ripley.
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jk
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 09:14 pm:   

Yeah, Purple Noon is fantastic. One of my favorite movies.
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ben peek
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:54 pm:   

my thing for scorcese films, at least the old ones, was the energy. i dug the energy in them. i never thought they had much intelligence via subtext and such going on, but i thought they had a nice, vibrant kind of energy to them.

BRINGING OUT THE DEAD was the last one that had though, tho, and i think most of that came from the connelly book, which i quite liked.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 11:23 pm:   

I remember there was a big rerelease of Purple Noon some years ago...but I missed it. That was right around the time I was reading the books, too. My memory is not the best. Add to list.

A coworker and I recently noticed some info about Ripley Under Ground and had stifled wha---?!?!? reaction. What happened to it? Pepper is creepy...I could see him as Ripley. Too bad there's no young Deneuve to play his wife.

OMG...Pepper was in M.A.N.T.I.S.!!!
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 11:39 pm:   

I watched THE PROPOSITION; quite respectable but it didn't do much for me. The setting, and some of the local residents, were worth a look. Must be the week for films about murderous Irish clans. John Hurt chewed the scenery with a vengeance, and it was some tough scenery.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 03:22 am:   

yeah, i though the setting in THE PROPOSITION was the best thing it had going for it. i did like the ray winstone part though, mainly because i felt quite sympathetic to his position.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 06:34 am:   

Speaking of Winstone, just saw SEXY BEAST, which didn't do much for me. Seemed to me the director/scenarist couldn't quite decide what to do with the story. Was it about the Ben Kingsley character? Then why the second half of the movie? Was it a heist film? Then why don't we get to see any of the planning, maneuvering, etc.? It was neither fish nor fowl. A couple of nice, half-realized performances...
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 09:36 am:   

I guess given the Nick Cave script THE PROPOSITION could have been truly embarrassing...it was much more restrained than I'd expected. (I was expecting an attempt to do Blood Meridian without licensing the book.) I liked the music as well, which (along with Pearce's presence) gave off a few echoes of RAVENOUS.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 06:51 pm:   

I saw half a movie n Nicaragua. I went into a theater to get cool in Chinandega and saw part of an Italian comedy dubbed into Spanish called Sexo Automatico.

It sucked. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 18, 2006 - 08:42 pm:   

Watched Habit, a NYC vampire movie by Larry Fessenden, who also stars. It's pretty good, albeit overlong. It really doesn't have much of a plot, boy meets sexy vampire, becomes addicted to bein bitten, and the two sleaze it up all over the Lower East Side, which--though the film was shot in 1997--takes the seedier settings and makes it look completely pre-gentrtfication. Grungily atmospheric, erotic, pretty cool.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 06:41 am:   

Fessenden also plays the dad in HEADSPACE. If you liked HABIT, I would recommend WENDIGO, starring the wonderful Patricia Clarkson. Really spooky and effective take on Native American spirituality right up to the point where they decide to show the monster. Like Tourneur's CURSE OF THE DEMON, showing the creature ruins the suspense. Fortunately in both, it happens pretty late.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 06:53 am:   

Got it on order....
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 07:46 am:   

I was vegging on the couch last night and ended up watching Lost. Boy, has the quality of that show diminished. Last night's episode consisted of some BS flasback about John on a marijuana farm and how he (maybe) killed an undercover cop, sandwiched in with scenes of John saving Mr Echo from a polar bear. Utter crap, I thought. The polar bear stuff was way cheesy.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 08:25 am:   

I thought it was an improvement over the last 2 episodes. It seemed like they were trying to recapture the feel of the first season. However, the flashback wasn't interesting. I'm getting really fed up with the flashbacks.

I also thought the polar bear stuff was bad. Why did the bear drag Eko back to the cave? If it had Eko for food, why kill a boar, why not just feast on Eko and then go for a boar later? It seemed really illogical.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 08:28 am:   

VARIETY writes that HABIT, NO TELLING and WENDIGO "comprise an accomplished, unofficial trilogy of urban paranoia, alienation and metaphysical dread." Anybody seen NO TELLING?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 08:34 am:   

No, not me. Think I'll watch Wendigo and then probably go for No Telling....
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 08:39 am:   

No, I haven't seen NO TELLING, but it's supposed to be some green riff on the Frankenstein story.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 02:13 pm:   

Okay, seriously, here is something I would like to see. Any of you guys with Hollywood connections, listen up.

It would be a show called "I Know You From Somewhere..." and each week somebody with some indie-film cred (director, actor, screenwriter) would interview a successful character actor from TV, movies or commercials -- you know, the kind of guys who are instantly recognizable, but not big-time celebs in their own right (Wm Forsythe, Luis Guzman, Lance Henricksen, etc.). It would be really interesting to hear war stories about what the acting life is like at that level.

Hell, you could even chop these up into ten-fifteen minute "webisodes" and sell that to imdb.com.

Good idea?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 02:46 pm:   

Not bad, but putting it together would be the trick. Also, a better title would be "You're...Wait! It's Right On The Tip Of My Tongue!" However, most of these guys have egos, and I don't think they'd relate to being on a show with a name like either title. Some wouldn't mind, I expect, but I'd be surprised if most didnt reject being characterized that way.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 04:00 pm:   

Last night's Lost was an all-time low. Sweat-lodge visions are right up there with random dreams as cop-outs for plotting your show. And Desmond's time-scrambled reference to Locke's "Speech" was one of the baldest lumps of lame exposition I've ever seen shoved into a script to satisfy the mystery mandate. Gah.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 05:56 pm:   

Gotta agree...bad badder baddest.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 06:04 pm:   

Yet, honestly, Wednesday night at 9 o'clock, put the kids to bed, one hour to be a vegetable before I get the second wind where I feel like doing something requiring energy...I probably won't give up on the show. I wonder if they've lost some of their key creators.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 06:34 pm:   

Is the sweat lodge any more ridiculous than Locke's dreams in Season 1 or Jack's vision of his dead father? Or last season with Eko's dreams with Yemi? The show's always been hokey and had silly cop-outs for plotting, but at first we were forgiving of the crap in it because it delivered in other areas. Now it's not delivering in the other areas, so we're less forgiving of the hokiness.


Dave, I like the idea. Perhaps have lesser known "working famous" people on it (Jason Flemyng would be a good person for it, he's the sort of guy you see in dozens of movies but don't always remember, he was even cast as a forgettable person in Bruiser).
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 06:42 pm:   

That was I doing, Marc, vegging, but even so....The only reason I watched was because I was hoping they'd show the foot again. :-) I wonder if anything will ever come of that.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 09:34 pm:   

That'd be a good slogan for the season: "Be there for the Foot!"
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 09:46 pm:   

Hopefully they'll eventually reveal that on the far side of the bay, directly opposite the foot, there's an enormous ass... :-)
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 11:40 pm:   

I just watched LOOKING FOR COMEDY IN THE MUSLIM WORLD, which was average Albert Brooks, on the low-end of the laugh spectrum but still fairly amusing. I'm sure Brooks would appreciate the fact that I've scaled my expectations of a new Albert Brooks movie way back.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 19, 2006 - 11:41 pm:   

"I'm not sure which is more unnerving. The fact that it is a giant ass, or that it has three cheeks."
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 20, 2006 - 03:35 am:   

:-)

That's gonna be it for me and Lost for the year, probably. Y'all tell me if the Foot comes back, huh?
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, October 20, 2006 - 07:56 am:   

I thought the island was full of enormous asses. Or is that just the creative team :-)

I'll let you know if the foot returns. I don't expect it to this season.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 20, 2006 - 08:02 am:   

"I thought the island was full of enormous asses. Or is that just the creative team..."

Ah, so the foot is symbolism. :-)

I kinda think it'll be back this season. Why else show it in last season's cliffhanger? But you could be right.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, October 20, 2006 - 03:49 pm:   

Saw THE PRESTIGE. It's well crafted, atmospheric, slow and moody, and in places quite effective. The casting bugged me, though; most of the actors constantly jarred me out of the story. (The jarring accents reach a peak in David Bowie.)

I can't imagine how it played out for those who haven't read the book and didn't know the story; whether they'd feel confused or gratified. There was very little suspense for me, but I wasn't expecting any. I just wanted to see how Nolan pulled it all together.

It's a great book, and could have had a far worse adaptation.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, October 21, 2006 - 09:40 am:   

Someone wrote elsewhere that's it's only about 20% related to the book. (but they did enjoy it)
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MarcL
Posted on Saturday, October 21, 2006 - 01:16 pm:   

This thread moved on to 48...but it's far more than 20% book-derived. Worth seeing if you're a fan. I hope Chris Priest gets a boost from it.

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