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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, April 24, 2005 - 08:07 am:   

Here's a bleak little item I saw last night -- The Intended dir. by Kristian Levring. Sort of jungle nor set in 1920s Malaysia. Starring Janet McTeer. About a family of ivory traders. Murder, madness, et al....Very bleak. I kinda liked it.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 07:47 am:   

I finally had a chance to see SHAUN OF THE DEAD. Very funny stuff! Lots of great, subtle sight and sound gags. Made me laugh at a time when I really needed it...

I just noticed that Todd Solondsz has a new one coming out Friday. Any advance word?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 08:13 am:   

Is this Palindromes? If so, i hear it's not so hot.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 08:32 am:   

Yeah, Palindromes. Maybe the review could be:

Gag? Not a ton. SOS!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 08:54 am:   

I hear it tries for too much -- it seeks to be a romant ic comedy, no Solondz's strength, and isn't that funny.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 10:00 am:   

He's going to have trouble topping HAPPINESS, and the trajectory is not promising.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 10:43 am:   

What? So not a word about my pallindromic review? I was pretty proud of that!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 10:50 am:   

It was very good....

:-)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 09:25 pm:   

I saw Palindromes and didn't care for it all that much. A romantic comedy? It never occurred to me that's what he was trying for. It's not romantic and it's not a comedy. There are funny things in it but that's not the tone he's going for at all.

I loved Happiness so maybe was expecting too much.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 09:32 pm:   

Well, I said it was a failed romantic comedy... :-) About teen pregnancy, right?
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 09:34 pm:   

Among other things.
It's also about abortion and presumably something about identity or he wouldn't have had four-five actresses and an actor play the same part...blah blah blah.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 10:02 pm:   

Oh, well. Not a good one, huh. Better next time Todd, let's hope.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 06:10 am:   

Has anybody seen Von Trier's The Five Obstructions on DVD?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 09:01 am:   

Not I...
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 09:38 am:   

It would be very difficult indeed for any director to outdo HAPPINESS, a film that frustrates me because even the most dedicated film buffs among my friends cannot bring themselves to see it.

Meanwhile, I just saw the German film DOWNFALL, about the last days of Hitler in the bunker. Shocking and controversial for its very human Hitler, who can actually be likeable between moments of revelatory evil.

Reviewed it at length in my newsgroup, but the bottom line: I found it very powerful.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 10:27 am:   

The acting is tremendous. Bruno Ganz in particular. He's remarkable. The scenes out of the bunker were some of them chilling. But i've now seen three movies about Hitler's last days and don't feel this one, though the best of the bunch, added much. The idea of a human Hitler has been documented and while I sympathize with the depiction of evil as a kind of outgrowth of banality...Well, one review I read--I can't recall who wrote it--said he or she thought the movie strayed dangerously close to nostalgia and I tend to agree. Many Germans have a complex relationship to this period in their history and this films displays that relationship. Nonetheless, it's very affecting, albeit somewhat too literal for my tastes.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 12:11 pm:   

I haven't seen the Hitler movie yet, but I'm having trouble thinking of why he'd be likeable.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 12:13 pm:   

He loved his dog,
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 12:36 pm:   

Oh, in that case...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 12:55 pm:   

They depict some human moments among the insane ones.

Particularly unpleasant is the episode concerning Frau Goebbels offing her own children
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 05:27 pm:   

Stephen: within the context of the film, he's kind and fatherly toward his secretary, loving toward the Goebbels children, and relatively congenial among the folks he likes.

You can understand why the secretary would like him and look up to him.

Then, of course, he turns around and explodes into a murderous rant.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 06:34 am:   

Gotta see this; it's playing near my office. Hey, it's either that or Sin City! :-)
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 04:11 pm:   

Being kind to his secretary -- kind of too little to late for him, is it not?

All that really says to me, is that he was charismatic, which I already knew. His great public speaking ability, was really his only redeeming feature, if he even had one. He's still surprising for me that way. He wasn't that intelligent of a man -- average at best. He wasn't that handsome of a man either, again, average at best. Yet his charismatic public voice, and his appeal to the glorious germanic past, could have an almost spellbinding affect on the masses. But I still can't see him as at all likeable, regardless of the few people he was decent to.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 04:13 pm:   

But that's me. I'm aware that there are many people out there that still like the man to this day. I've even met a few...
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 06:46 am:   

StephenB: you're supporting an unnecessary argument.

Neither Lucius or myself or any of the folks supporting this movie believes, in any real sense, that Hitler's congeniality toward those in his circle qualifies him as a likeable guy.

We don't like him. We're not arguing that this film changed our opinion of him.

However, dramatizing his relationships with those in his inner circle, capturing his charm as well as his madness makes a hell of a lot more sense than making him radiate loathesomeness to the degree that nobody would have ever gotten close to him in the first.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 06:47 am:   

place. In the first place.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 07:05 am:   

I still think Dick Shawn did the best job of capturing his charm.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 07:05 am:   

Like Kenneth Mars said in the Producers, "Ah. Hitler! He could dance!" :-)
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T Andrews
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 08:52 am:   

I look forward to seeing the film. Normally I abhor biographical movies because they either beatify or vilify and the subject of the movie comes off like a cartoon character.
This depiction of Hitler sounds fascinating. Everybody knows he was A Very Bad Man, so we should be mature enough to then take a close look at the Man. Sounds very interesting.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 09:06 am:   

Like I said, Ganz is marvelous in the role. If you're not ODed on the subject, as I kinda was, it's a hell of a movie.
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StephenB
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 02:14 pm:   

Adam: I wasn't suggesting that you or Lucius actually liked Hitler. I know better. I was just explaining why I am, I guess, unsympathetic to Hitler's more "human" portrayal, or to the people close to him who liked and admired him. So I think the movie will have a difficult time convincing me of a more sympathetic view, which you've expressed some what in your posts. But if it does, then I guess it will have succeeded at something.

But it seems like there's been lots of Hitler movies of late and like Lucius, I feel It's been done to near death.

What about in fiction? Would any serious writers actually consider doing a Hitler story -- whether historically realistic or fantastic?

Does Roth's recent, The Plot Against America, feature Hitler much?
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Rich P.
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 05:24 pm:   

...and he was a better painter than Churchill.
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StephenB
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 05:49 pm:   

I watched John Ford's The Searchers last night with a couple friends. I thought it was good. Some of the parts -- however intended -- were really funny from our modern perspective (we were also getting high the whole time). I liked how -- mostly through the main characters, who were not at all chivalrous heroes -- the racism, exploitive and desructive tendencies, of white Americans were portrayed. I Like how John Wayne's character becomes less obsessed with actually rescuing his niece and more and more obsessed with revenge and destruction, fueled by racism. Although the movie was somewhat whitewashed and contsrainded by its time (1950s), It still gets across some of the bleaker realities of the period and place it portrays. Dated in some ways, but still worth a watch.

Do you think that maybe John Wayne was giving some subtle hints about himself -- which were probably over most of 1950s American's heads-- and his sexuality?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 06:14 pm:   

I haven't see that movie for so long, I can't comment. But I'm pretty sure that whatever hints are in the movie were put there by Ford, not Wayne--it's possible that Ford was commenting on Wayne, for example.
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StephenB
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   

Ok, that makes sense. Wayne's character wears a lot of pink shirts and color coordinated clothing. One of my fiends who watched it with me is gay -- although not stereotypically, with a desire to retain his masculinity -- and we speculated that Wayne might have had some say in his own wardrobe.
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Lawrence A
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 03:26 am:   

Saw 'Last life in the Universe', a very strange recent Japanese/Thai film. Did not know what to make of it. This bookish Japanese guy in Bangkok who just wants to commit suicide all the time has this strange wierd platonic relationship with a Thai hooker, while hiding from the yakuza who have killed his brother. Infuritating 'cause nothing much happens but watchable somehow. Kind of reminded me in some ways of Wang Kar Wai's (have I spelt that right?) films, he of 'Chunking Express' and 'Days of being Wild' - languid, leisurely, unhurried but in an ineffable Oriental way. Also reminded me of some of Wim Wenders, his slow languid style esp in 'Alice in the City' and 'The Goalkeeper's fear of the Penalty', but not as good.

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Lucius
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 04:53 am:   

I think I liked Last Life somewhat better than you did. One way or another, it was a good flick. Did you notice Takashi Miike, the dir. of Audition and others, in a small part as a yakuza....
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 08:24 am:   

You snooze, you lose department: Downfall has moved on, replaced at my neighborhood theater by a doc about Ken Lay and the boys from Enron.

Guess I'll have to wait for the DVD.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 10:00 am:   

I thought Downfall was the one about Ken Lay.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 10:13 am:   

That was Lay: The Man, The Verb, and the Potato Chip.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 12:03 pm:   

Are you sure you're not thinking of Bob Dylan's prophetic, "Lay, Lay, DeLay"?
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 06:27 am:   

I finally saw Ong Bak. The action sequences were incredible. Seeing real action like this makes me really hate the trend of going towards computer graphics action. Something like Kung Fu Hustle was entertaining, but too often resorted to bad CG.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 08:06 am:   

Yeah, if you can get a hold of the HK version, it's even better. No rap soundtrack, for one thing. But Tony Jaa is the shit, man. And I love that primitive Muy Thai he uses. Very Cool.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 09:40 am:   

I don't recall any rap in the soundtrack, except at the closing credits. It was mostly Eastern sounding stuff, a lot of bamboo flute. So was that the HK soundtrack? I saw it at an art theater, so there's a chance they got the HK version.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 10:20 am:   

Wow. Yeah. You're fortunate. I didn't know they had released that version. I saw it first, though it didn't have subtitles, and again in a multiplex with a rap soundtrack.
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MarcL
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 09:34 pm:   

I see that DARKNESS and THE NAMELESS, both by Jaume Balaquero, are both out on DVD now. I know THE NAMELESS is based on Ramsey Campbell's novel of the same name, which makes it required viewing for me--I've never come across a version in any language so it was bizarre to see it on sale (but out of stock) at the local Fred Meyer.

Lucius, have you seen either or both of these?
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 10:39 pm:   

The NAMELESS is excellent. I not so keen on the Dark--not that it's not worth watching, but it's not very scary.
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, May 01, 2005 - 10:07 pm:   

I don't expect to see a lot of love for HITCHIKER'S GUIDE on this thread, but I saw it with my kids today. I've never read the books, so I could judge how well it worked as a stand-alone film, and the answer is not very well. The audience was quite muted except for a few people (Adams fans, I suppose) who seemed to laugh whenever they recognized some classic joke or gag from the series. There were some funny bits eventually, but the whole thing seemed to stop and start and stop to admire itself repeatedly, just when it should have been gathering speed to launch. I will say that at no point did I wish I was watching REVENGE OF THE SITH instead, in spite of the trailer that came immediately before the movie; and the trailer for DARK WATER looked better on the big screen than it did on the little one (gave my oldest one the lingering creeps at bedtime), although I have slim hope for this and didn't see any reason for a remake, since the original is already one of the best ghost stories on film. Jennifer Connolly did look very grim; not as crushed and struggling as the downtrodden mother in the original, but then again...this is an American film. Gotta look sexy even through the despair! (I'll bet they manage to get at least one gratuitous wet shirt/erect nipple shot into the remake.) Anyway, re HITCHHIKER, I laughed a lot more in the second half, but by then I had already given up on it being very good as a movie, and resigned myself to not being part of the target audience. Doesn't RED DWARF do all this, and do it a lot better--while being better SF at the same time?
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, May 01, 2005 - 10:30 pm:   

Yeah, I passed on Hitchhiker. No interest. Didn't want to read the books, didn't want to see the movie....
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:29 am:   

Funny you should be talking about Balaguero's THE NAMELESS; I just watched it on DVD this wknd. (For the sake of discussion, I found it at Best Buy!!) Liked it a lot. Great performances, atmosphere, etc. The old guy who played Santini was creepy and perfect. The mom turned in a great performance as well. Much more subtle than Se7en (to which, I guess, it is frequently compared). I was not sure I was sold on the ending, though. After all that tense buildup, the payoff scene was so quick. Can't decide whether this made it more effective or less. I suppose it would have been easy to overdo it and turn it into some big melodrama. But for such a huge, globe-spanning storyline to end with such a simple, horrific act was quite unexpected.

Hey, it was stylish, well acted and held my interest for 90 minutes without one bare breast, so that puts it head and shoulders over most of the genre.

Speaking of Best Buy, has anyone else noticed what a good job those guys do in stocking rare 1970s cult/schlock (and I mean that in a good way) horror films? Found two of my favorites there: George Romero's MARTIN and Bob Clark's DEATHDREAM, neither of which I ever thought would be stocked by a chain!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:53 am:   

Best Buy? Que?

I didn't think the Dark was all that tense, but Balagueris has style, for sure.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 07:16 am:   

Best Buy does a really nice job of targeting their DVD buying to lowbrow demographics, which, fortunately includes camp/cult/schlock/shock/horror. I also got my copy of THE HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD, an awesome Amicus horror anthology flick, there. Now, if only I could find the original TALES FROM THE CRYPT with Peter Cushing!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 07:34 am:   

Is it a store?
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 07:49 am:   

Best Buy is a big chain of electronics that sells DVDs.

I sort of want to see Hitchiker's Guide. The books were entertaining, but in that geek humor sort of way. Maybe I'll catch it at a matinee or cheap theater.

I started watching the Errol Flynn collection over the weekend. It's entertaining, although Flynn doesn't have much variety (he's a cocky swashbuckling hero in everything). But I had to get it due to The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. I just get a kick out of anything about Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex.

Surprisingly, Captain Blood may be the most realistic pirate film I've seen. It didn't portray pirates as democratic, but it did deal with privateers, as well as pirates going "legit", which most pirate films ignore. Much better than something like Pirates of the Caribbean.

Lucius, are you going to review the next Star Wars film? It still amazes me that so many think the last two were crap, but still think this one will be good.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 08:22 am:   

Robert, I managed to miss the last two films and I kinda hope I miss this one. I don't feel like kicking that particular puppy or putting myself through the experience.

Have you seen A High Wind In Jamaica? That's a pretty interesting pirate movie...and fairly realistic.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 08:23 am:   

Lucius, come on..."Turn on the Fun...Best Buy"? The dancing Idea Box? Wow, you really do live on the edge!
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 08:39 am:   

I haven't seen A High Wind in Jamaica yet. I've added it to my Netflix queue.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 08:54 am:   

I don't know what you're talking about Dave. Are sure the bear, all that, aren't part of a dream you're having....?
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 09:50 am:   

THE HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD and TALES FROM THE CRYPT was one of the more memorable double-features I saw when I was a kid. I'm pretty sure I've seen the latter offered on DVD.

The latest Locus online has a good review of Hitchhiker's Guide. The movie gave me no desire to seek out further Adams, but the review actually had the opposite effect. By explaining all the ways the movie blew it, I got a better sense of how the previous versions acquired a following.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:01 am:   

Sorry. Best Buy's ads are all over the boob tube. Good for you, Lucius, if you can resist trash TV's siren allure. Sometimes the nightmare of American commercialism seems like a fantasy, but it's all too real!

I'm glad I'm not the only TFTC fan. Never saw the movie, although I read the DC comics novelization by the underrated pulp horror writer Jack Oleck and those exquisitely creepy TV commercials on the NYC stations were tattoed onto my brain! I've got to get it!
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:12 am:   

Actually, memory returning, I recollect I saw HOUSE THE DRIPPED BLOOD at a different theater.

I saw TALES FROM THE CRYPT in a double bill with THE FROGS (one of Ray Milland's finest). But I loved all those British horror anthology shows. Loved em!

Glad to hear about THE NAMELESS. As I recall, the book had a very abrupt and improbable ending as well (sort of a riff out of CARRIE). I'll look for this and DARKNESS. I just want to support the new breed of supernatural horror, which is pretty much a return to the old style--stuff like the Robert Wise version of THE HAUNTING, THE INNOCENTS, and THE CHANGELING with George C. Scott. Maybe we're getting to the point where someone could do a faithful and effective Aickman adaptation.

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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:24 am:   

You might want to check out LONDON VOODOO, as well.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:29 am:   

I'm interested in CRASH, a few weeks away.

Or at least, hoping against hope.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 11:29 am:   

If you'll remember, THTDB had a very neat little voodoo vignette, also.

Can anyone supply me a list or a resource for finding those old Hammer/Amicus horror anthologies? I remember DR. TERROR'S HOUSE OF HORRORS, DEAD OF NIGHT, and TALES THAT WITNESS MADNESS with Joan Collins.

Other recos?
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 11:30 am:   

Or, perhaps, modern examples similar to CREEPSHOW or the rarely-discussed, very underrated TALES FROM THE HOOD with Clarence Williams, III...
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 11:45 am:   

Oh yeah, DEAD OF NIGHT! Hammer reissued a bunch of its movies recently, first on VHS (which is when I picked up FIVE MILLION YEARS TO EARTH) and more recently on DVD (I've seen the Cushing/Lee Dracula movies, among others). I don't have a one-stop shop for them, though. Most of these I saw on faded tapes that an old friend and Hammer fan lent me years ago.
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JV
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 02:08 pm:   

Kung Fu Hustle was awesome. Hitchhiker's was not so good. Original series was great.

JeffV
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 02:53 pm:   

Thanks for mentioning that DARKNESS and THE NAMELESS came out on American DVD. Got them on the way from Netflix. Lots of times before something is released, Netflix will let you "save" it in your queue, so you'll know when it comes out, but they didn't have these listed until they were released, so I had no advance warning.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 03:01 pm:   

I saw the low budget, kind of cheesey, horror/zombie movie, Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things, a couple nights ago at the end of a mushroom trip. I wouldn't say it's that good of a movie, but it's not that bad and it's refreshing in its attempt to lay down a story, some characters, and an explanation for the zombies in the first third of the movie (some will not like how long this takes). It's about a Satanist film student director, who brings his six actors to a graveyard, a location for a film, where they practise a Satanic ritual to bring back the dead... which doesn't seem to work. In their frustration they mock the dark lord and disrespect the dead. None of the characters are very likeable, but that's part of the morality play's point. It seems the lesson is to give the Devil his due.

Liked it better than the recent Dawn of the Dead remake, although it's no Romero or Fulci zombie film.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 03:29 pm:   

This was directed by Bob Clark, the same guy who did Deathdream, which Dave mentioned.

I'd really like to see the movie, The Nameless, now. Looks good. Is it only out on DVD?
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 04:09 pm:   

Based off of the Moby Dick conversation on another thread, I'm curious what you (or anyone) thought about the John Huston (who I know you like) movie with the screen play written by Ray Bradbury? I saw this movie sometime last year and I liked it, but I haven't read the book so...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 04:56 pm:   

I thought if it wasn't Huston's worst movie, it was close, nailed to the mast by a horrid Gregroy Peck performance. The only saving grace, for me, was that Houston, who thought little of Bradbury, beat the piss out of him on the set one day. Not that I've anything against Bradbury, other than his poetry, but I still like the story.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 05:12 pm:   

Stephen, it's so funny that you should mention CHILDREN SHOULDN'T PLAY WITH DEAD THINGS (which I also thought to look for at Best Buy -- they didn't have it, dammit!).

Back in the mid-80s, before "superstations" took over cable TV and there was still such a thing as regional stations with late, late shows, one of the New England stations ran a horror week with rare, cult stuff at 3:00 a.m. I risked major office meltdown to stay up and watch CSPWDT and DEATHDREAM on successive nights, and it is the only time I've ever seen these films air on television!

Don't remember the details of CSPWDT, but I remember not expecting much more than Ed Wood-style cheese and being very shocked and surprised at how effective Clark's use of grainy, hand-held verite-type footage was. The overall air of dread would have been envied by many a modern horror "master." Maybe it was the lateness of the hour, but I remember it being really pretty suspenseful.

Writer Alan Ormsby went on to a successful writing career that included DERANGED (with Roberts "HOME ALONE" Blossom) and MY BODYGUARD. Clark had a pretty notable run in the early-to-mid 80s with PORKY'S, A CHRISTMAS STORY and TURK 182, and has worked quite steadily since. (I'll bet the residuals on ACS alone probably keep him in clover.)

Anybody see Clark's BLACK CHRISTMAS with Margot Kidder and Kier Dullea?

Thesis: the Golden Age of American Horror Film ran from THE NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD in 1968 to POLTERGEIST in 1982, with only sporadic high points since.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 05:50 pm:   

I should see more John Huston films. I've seen a few of his classics, but not that many. Fat City's one I'll try to see, which you consider the best boxing movie ever made. What are some of your other favorites by him?

It looks like both Black Christmas and CSPWDT are being remade next year. Seems like there's a demand for horror movies, just not much demand for originality...

We'll be flooded by horror remakes in the next couple years.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:00 pm:   

Just to play off your thesis Dave. Do you think a war (especially an unjust one) can be fuel, or the spark, for good horror movies? Maybe not always good, but... does war increase interest in horror? Lots of horror in the insane American 80's as well.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:37 pm:   

I don't know about war, but I did read an article about how there are better zombie movies under Republican presidents.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:43 pm:   

John Huston is the shit. Asphalt Jungle, The Man Who Would Be King, Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Fat City, The Maltese Falcon... see 'em all.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:51 pm:   

Also Beat the Devil (screenplay by Capote), The Night of the Iguana, Wise Blood, the Misfits, the African Queen, etc. etc.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 06:53 pm:   

It's a somewhat historical fact that horror sells better during depressions and during Republican Presidencies.

I think I'm fine with the horror remakes of late, as most of the films they're remaking weren't that good to begin with. CSPWDT is kind of a piece of shit, and the original Amityville Horror is unwatchable. Black Christmas was pretty decent, a good proto-slasher flick.

Anyone with Hammer questions, let me know. I am a Hammer idiot with about 60 of the damn things on dvd.

Amicus was best known for their anthology films. House that Dripped Blood
Asylum
Tales from the Crypt
Dr. Terror's House of Horrors
Vault of Horror
From Beyond the Grave
The Monster Club
Torture Garden

All kinds of good shit.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 07:04 pm:   

I can back that up. He is a Hammer idiot. :-)
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Bob Urell
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 04:47 am:   

Yeah, I too have seen Jason's Hammer idiocy firsthand. He's actually on the cusp of ascending to Hammer village idiot. So he's got that going for him, which is nice.
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Tim Akers
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 07:02 am:   

I enjoyed Kung Fu Hustle, but I'm getting a little tired of the dominance of wire fu. I don't mind the occassional trick, but it's getting to be a bit much. Loved the movie, but my favorite part was the early stuff. The battle of the three masters was definitely the best sequence in the movie. Still. Great flick.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 07:11 am:   

If you're tired of wire fu, check out Ong Bak.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 07:56 am:   

Any other good martial arts films without wire fu?

I watched House of Flying Daggers last night. It was pretty, but I didn't find it very interesting.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 08:14 am:   

My recollection of CSPWDT was positive, but I was half asleep. I don't doubt that, in the cold light of day it might seem somewhat less meritorious. I have fond memories of it, though. Maybe I SHOULDN'T watch it again, for that reason.

I don't doubt that wars and social unrest create fertile ground for horror filmmaking, in that horror gives us a chance to address too-sensitive issues and too-horrible outcomes in metaphorical ways. It had never occurred to me before, but Chuck Pahlaniuk's thesis that ROSEMARY'S BABY addressed women's control of their bodies and THE STEPFORD WIVES examined issues of women's empowerment makes perfect sense to me in retrospect. As far as 1968, at least one of the movies we discussed, DEATHDREAM, explicitly looks at the Vietnam war (maladjusted returning veteran as vampire) through a horror lens. Even horror films of today mirror current-events terrors (CABIN FEVER's water-borne virus as a metaphor for terrorism fears; THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE transposing the alienation and psychic dislocation of Iraq War soldiers into a fictional context). Overall, I would say the 1970s, starting with Altamont and continuing through to the attempted assassination of Reagan, were a scary, violent, out-of-control time whose concerns were best addressed in horror terms. See the way that the alienation of latch-key kids is mirrored in movies like MARTIN and THE EXORCIST.

All terribly facile observations, certainly, as befits an internet message board (even a relatively erudite one like this), but I think there is some truth there.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 08:30 am:   

Robert, I'd suggest the Korean flick Arahan. The director's previous flick, No Blood No Tears, was a great noir movie...
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 03:22 pm:   

I can see why you'd say CSPWDT is kind of a piece of shit Jeremy. In some ways it is, but I liked it a little better than that. I'd rather watch a low budget horror movie that doesn't totally work and has shitty acting, instead of a big budget piece of shit movie, with big stars, no sign of originality or intelligence, that doesn't work and has shitty acting along with a horrible script.

Has anyone seen the Amityville remake? I heard it's junk. I'd rather see independent filmmakers do original horror movies instead, even if they have to do it with a low budget.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 03:35 pm:   

That's probably Jason you're talking to....Jason is Hammer Central.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - 04:17 pm:   

Oh, ok.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 06:38 am:   

For the life of me, I can not understand this urge to remake old horror stuff (NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, PSYCHO, TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE, AMITYVILLE HORROR). I mean, I can understand remaking a once-in-a-lifetime story, but with the exception of PSYCHO, these stories ain't that original. Can't somebody come up with a slightly different twist on the hack-em-up, eat-em-up subgenres? (For its flaws, 28 DAYS LATER was a good example of this. Even JEEPERS CREEPERS had some visual flair.)

Whither Clive Barker?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 07:34 am:   

Clive Barker? What did ever do that was worth a cinematic shit? He's in Hollywood.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 07:51 am:   

Yeah, I realize that he is not going to be remembered alongside the all-time greats, but my point was that, in a genre drowning in remakes, at least he had some semi-original ideas. (And I really enjoyed the first two HELLRAISERs; they are definite guilty pleasures.) I mean, even if you hate Clive Barker, you must admit that, compared to a remake of THE AMITYVILLE HORROR (which wasn't even that good in the first place), something like LORD OF ILLUSIONS looks like BRAZIL.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 09:32 am:   

It looked like a bad student film to me, but I get yr point.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 02:17 pm:   

I Liked the original Hellraiser as well. First time I saw it I was 10, and it scared me, that's forsure. I'll admit I was even tempted to jump behind my friend's couch a couple times the first time I watched it. And for its time, it was a pretty original horror movie (based on one of Clive's own short stories). After seeing it periodicaly since, I'm not quite as impressed by the movie, but I still like it and think it's better then a lot of horror movies out there.

I still haven't seen Lord of Illusions, but will get to it.


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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 02:28 pm:   

HELLRAISER was pretty great for its time, despite the very very limp ending, which seemed cobbled on to permit a sequel. I liked the overall air of sleaziness, the sexiness of the female lead, the nice visual flourishes and, most of all, the screwy, off-the-wall, DC Comics-style inventiveness behind the Cenobites, at last some (to quote Bugs Bunny) innnn-ter-esting monsters.

Loved it at the time, but, yeah, it has not aged all that well. Still more original and fun than most of the dreck that is churned out of the horror mills.

I guess they've made something like five of them now, haven't they? I lost track after the third one with Terry Farrell.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 03:10 pm:   

I haven't really seen many of the sequels (maybe the second one, if any), but it looks like as of this year Hellraiser 8's been released...
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 03:24 pm:   

I saw Hellraiser when it came out. The best thing in the movie was when Jesus fell out of the closet. Everyone jumped. I thought making Jesus the equivalent of the cat in Alien was pretty neat. It had a fair number of imaginative touches, and the magic box echoed a series of powerful nightmares I'd had as a kid so I was really drawn into the movie.

But at that point Barker still showed some of the restraint and economy evident in his first set of novellas and short stories. He had not yet let himself go...
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 03:52 pm:   

But cinematically, it reeked of art student...all these clever-angle-for-no-reason deals.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 05:00 pm:   

Horror cinema seems to attract either outright hacks, or art students who want Vampire Jesus swooping down on the lovely nun to the strains of the Swans. One doesn't see too many clever craftsmen/storytellers in the genre. Or if they do work in the genre, they move on quickly to other things. It's either the remake of AMITYVILLE, or it's SUSPIRIA with music by the Goblins. Very little in-between.

Personally, I'm willing to forgive a lot of art-school mish-mash, as long as the filmmaker doesn't bore me.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 06:02 pm:   

Well, I was bored by Hellraiser...because of the art school shit and the mannered dialogue and the pacing. Interesting horror films are being made in Spain and the Far East. I'll stick with those...
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2005 - 05:23 am:   

HELLRAISER the first didn't bore me so much as repel me. I found the sadism over the top.

Oddly enough, the immediate sequel, which was paced more like a jump-out-of-the-shadows oogie boogie film, didn't bother me so much. I found it a camp pleasure. Not very good, but a pleasure on that level.

Have not seen any of the others.

I haven't liked any of the other Barker films I've been exposed to, with the odd and eccentric exception of CANDYMAN...and, yes, I know it's not particularly better, but sometimes you just can't predict what will work for any particular individual, and that one worked for me.

(I still treasure, btw, Barker's reaction to a four-year-old, at a convention, who piped up that he loved CANDYMAN. Give him credit: he was unnerved. As was the entire audience. Barker asked the kid, if Candyman fought the Lion King, who would win? The kid thought about it and said, Candyman.)
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2005 - 06:21 am:   

I also rather liked CANDYMAN. I thought the premise of using urban legends (which were getting very big at the time due to Jan Michael Brunvand's series of books) as fodder for horror was pretty clever. And I could watch 48 hours of Jerry Lewis Telethon, as long as Virginia Madsen was on the screen, so for me, it added up to a winner.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2005 - 12:16 pm:   

I watched the first 30 minutes or so of SHIRI and found it dull enough that I'm not inclined to watch the rest. I'm clearly scraping the bottom of the library's Korean film collection (or at least those that were on Lucius's recommended list)(Shiri was not a recommended title...I just grabbed it because the box copy made it sound exciting).
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2005 - 06:14 pm:   

I've yet to see much Korean cinema but I know I'm missing out... for now.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Saturday, May 07, 2005 - 06:06 am:   

I watched Hitchikers Guide last night. It wasn't very good. Part of the problem is I'm not as interested in that style of geek humor anymore. Part was the film wasn't paced that well. The acting was the only worthwhile thing in the movie. Mos Def was good as an alien (he looked like he was trying to mimic human behavior without really understanding it).
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Bill Reynolds/Socrates17
Posted on Saturday, May 07, 2005 - 08:07 pm:   

I haven't been checking in here lately because, Lucius: You said you were swearing off the addiction!!!!

Nevertheless, I still retain my policy of commenting on themes that the rest of you who keep up have long since gone beyond.

Here's an idea for a Hitler movie: Norman Spinrad's The Iron Dream. There would have to be a framing sequence added, of course.

Couldn't read Spinrad for a long time since he pulled a really beautiful girl that I had the serious hots for at TriCon in 1966, but I eventually got over it. Years later. I was just SOOOO mature.

NO desire to see Hitchiker. The TV series was bad enough.
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Rich P.
Posted on Sunday, May 08, 2005 - 07:43 am:   

Thought The Interpreter wasn't awful. Sean Penn was pretty good (not 21 grams good, but pretty good) and Nicole Kidman almost had me convinced she'd studied linguistics (I'm sure Tom C. was a cunning linguist).

Barker: It was fun watching Cronenberg trying to act from within a burlap bag in "Night Breed". Some nice visuals, but the editing was a mess. Enjoyed his book "Weaveworld".
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allOFthemWITCHES
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2005 - 04:26 pm:   

if you're up for a psychological korean horror film, 'a tale of two sisters' is worth renting. i'm still trying to piece it together.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 06:44 am:   

Spent last weekend watching DEATHDREAM aka NIGHT WALK aka DEAD OF NIGHT. Not bad for a low-budge 70s B horror picture. I had forgotten how creepy and weird Andy the undead Viet Vet was. Amazing scene of him with mirror shades and gloves (in summer) at the drive-in watching "The Spacenauts" before he goes on a blood-sucking rampage. If only we could recapture the golden days of sicko exploitation cinema...:-)

I also saw the doc DIG, chronicling the careers of the Dandy Warhols and the Brian Jonestown Massacre. Anybody seen it?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 06:52 am:   

Tale of Two Sister is pretty good, maybe better than that.

Interpreter....Baaaaad.

The 70s B sicko flicks...I wish they'd go away.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 07:45 am:   

They are an acquired [bad] taste...:-)

Lucius, you should really check out DIG. It is a pretty interesting look into the nature of the post-grunge 90s rock biz through the lenses of a good pop band that made it (the Warhols) and an underground "genius" that struggled (BJM's megalomaniacal control freak supremo Anton Newcombe). Is it better to be a functional success than a doomed, psycho "visionary"? The eternal question, provocatively asked.
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Rich P.
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 09:21 am:   

Interpreter: Yeah, OK, on second viewing it died and inspired heckling. I'm easily conned by a good director's style. Are there any Pollack films you enjoyed?

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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 09:33 am:   

Yeah, I love Jeremiah Johnson and sorta liked 3 Days of the Condor and have a thing for The Yakuza, because Robert Mitchum v yakuza... Hey, huh?

Dave I'll try to find DIG, though I didn't much care for either band...
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 10:09 am:   

If you enjoy watching bravura displays of cracked/psychotic/a-hole behavior by indie-rock egotists, it is quite entertaining.

Newcombe seems as though he goal in life is to get his arse kicked every time he steps onto a stage. Imagine crossing Andy Kaufman with Steve Malkmus.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 07:29 pm:   

I'm putting this post here because it's vaguely related to the trailer for the forthcoming FIREFLY movie, "Serenity." And because I expect posting this on other boards might lead to flamewars of unimaginable fury...whereas here, it'll simply be a swiftly stifled spark.

I was baffled by the geekish enthusiasm lavished on the recent online trailers for "Serenity," the Joss Whedon theatrical continuation of the "Firefly" series. A fair bit of a geek myself, I borrowed the first season DVD from a friend and work and sat down to acquaint myself with the show.

After having made my way through the first disk and part of the second, I've given it up. I don't see the cult appeal of the show. The captain is kinda cool cause he cracks jokes and kills threatening enemies without remorse instead of leaving them to enact revenge later, but the rest of the characters make my skin crawl (Adam Baldwin is decent). And I had hoped we'd left behind the days when alien planets were mostly low-budget versions of the Old West (North American frontier lite)...with poolhalls yet...

I don't detect any original twists on sf themes here. It feels like the most generic form of standard TV Sci-Fi to me. I guess I haven't desired more of this sort of thing for many years, and I'm surprised there are so many people who apparently do.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 07:45 pm:   

I was equally unimpressed with the series when it aired. Just yr average schlock...

I wouldn't trust anyone who owned FIREFLY on DVD...
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 09:38 pm:   

I own Firefly on DVD.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 09:59 pm:   

Unclean....!!! :-)
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Minz
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 06:19 am:   

Hey Marc: I agree re Firefly. I loved the Captain for offing the trussed up goon who threatened to hunt him down, which kept me going for about three episodes. And Alec Baldwin's character showed hints of being interesting. But the mishmash of a little this (western), a little that (mafia), a little of this other thing (badly done high society/couture), left me both scratching my head and very disinterested. (And I'll come clean and admit to being a huge Buffy fan, as well as Bab 5, so it's not like I don't have the geek gene.)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 06:48 am:   

"...It's not like I don't have the geek gene.."

What a shocker! :-)
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 08:41 am:   

Clearly I posted this in the proper thread.

Yeah, Minz, the ballroom scene was the thing that pushed me all the way over the edge. Next stop, a planet that resembles Victorian England, with the captain cast in the unlikely role of Sherlock Holmes on the trail of Jack the Ripper.

When people say that Whedon added a unique and original twist to TV science fiction, maybe they simply mean he added a high class hooker.

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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 08:52 am:   

High class?

More an HIV positive lot lizard...
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 11:40 am:   

"Yes, captain, but it is hinted in the Concords of the Illustrious that the strain of HIV transmitted by the inhabitants of Cerulean Prime confers telepathic powers, hyperadvanced spatial intelligence, and humongous bazoongas."
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 11:53 am:   

Yo, I'm down with it, then...
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 12:22 pm:   

"Bazoongas" are a type of specialized pancreatic cell.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 12:38 pm:   

Not where I come from....
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Minz
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 01:20 pm:   

And a finer pair of pancreatic cells I never saw... *said in his best Groucho voice*
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 05:25 am:   

i figure most people got into the potential that a canceled show has. as in, you know, it could have been anything. in FIREFLY'S case a show without backlot planets.

still, i liked it. it appealed to the STAR WARS/ALIENS mash side of me. i mean, essentially it's han solo and chewbacca and friends in space. s'alright on that level. i demand real little from my telly.

btw, has anyone seen that film DOWNFALL about hitler in his bunker? sounds neat, but i dunno if it's a pay cash at the cinema thing.

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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 06:03 am:   

There was a series called SPACE RANGERS in the 90s starring Linda Hunt that I feel was superior to Firefly....and it sucked!

There's a bunch of stuff on DOWMFALL somewhere upthread, ATC loved it and I thought it incredibly well acted but am tired of the story.....
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Minz
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 10:20 am:   

Okay, confession time. I kinda liked Space Rangers...mostly for the Jack McGee's handyman character with all the cybernetic parts. Great comic relief from a personal favorite among the very minor character actors. Don't get me wrong, there were parts that were laughably bad, but it was a barren time for SF shows...
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 12:01 pm:   

Like I said, it was way better than Firefly...
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 01:39 pm:   

I really liked Firefly, which is odd, as I generally detest tv science fiction. I don't like Star Trek, Babylon 5, Farscape, etc.
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T Andrews
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 02:07 pm:   

I remember being 5 and 6 years old, watching SPACE:1999. I loved it. What was my mother thinking??
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 02:30 pm:   

At that age, I was watching FAR OUT SPACE NUTS with Bob Denver and Chuck McCann.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 04:15 pm:   

cool. upthread.

i'm with jason on FIREFLY being an odd one out for me. i usually hate the science fiction shows on tv. maybe it's just cause i never saw SPACE RANGERS that i like this, though...
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 06:59 pm:   

Just watched a remarkable fantasy movie, Russian, called THE NIGHT WATCH. The director's name was written in Cyrillic and I'm too lazy to go IMBD, but imagine a cross between Jeunet of Delicatessen and a contemporary horror director. say, Balagueros. The thesis of the film is that 1000 years ago there were two armies, the Army of Light and the Army of Darkness, who fought to a stalemate and signed a truce. In a thousand years, someone would come, the Other, who would side with one side or the other, and the battle would be resolved. Flash a thousand years forward--the armies of light (wizards, soceresses) and the forces of darkness (wizard, vampires, etc..) are fighting a kind of holding action in a contemporary seedy Moscow. Anton, the protagonist, is a wizard who was jumped into the Army of LIght by an old woman who lives in one of the horrible, massive Muscovite apt buildings. From that point the plot covers a lot of ground, which I won't try and summarize. But Anton and his allies are basically trying to avert a plane crash, a nuclear power plant meltdown, as well as finding the Other. They drive around Moscow in a jet truck (!)...The visuals are incredibly inventive. Particularly great is Anton's battle with two vampire who keep fading in and out. The only problem is the substitles are not the best, therefore I reccommend you wait for the theatrical release--which should be this summer or early fall. Anyway, very cool movie.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 07:23 pm:   

It's the first in a trilogy, I believe. Glad to hear it's actually good, because I thought it looked pretty promising from the trailer:

http://www2.foxsearchlight.com/nwnd/
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 07:36 pm:   

It's great, but the subtitles on the DVD make the film very confusing -- I'm sure they'll straighten that out with the theatrical release.
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Minz
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 11:30 pm:   

I was actually pitched the novels for this a couple of years ago (the writer is a fairly successful Russian SF writer). It looked interesting, and what few reviews I could find in English sounded intriguing, but there wasn't anything solid enough at the time to really pursue. I'll be curious to see how this does.
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, May 13, 2005 - 03:17 am:   

I'd never heard of the Russian movie Night Watch before. I think I'll really like it. Thanks.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, May 13, 2005 - 05:18 am:   

The main problem with the film. it's overplotted, but I'm hoping they can fix that with the subtitles and some judiciois re-editing...
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 07:57 am:   

Does anyone have thoughts on either KINGDOM OF HEAVEN or ENRON: THE SMARTEST GUYS IN THE ROOM?

Has anyone else out there noticed the growing phenomenon of wanting to go to the movies and not being able to find a single thing at local theaters that you want to see?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 08:06 am:   

I saw about a half hour of Kingdom Of Boredom...

Haven't seen the Enron thing...
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 08:07 am:   

I'm guessing that's not a rave. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 09:03 am:   

Just a peek through the multiplex door, followed by rush to the bathroom.... :-)

I saw a half hour of the second half, which is apparently the really boring half, containing Ridley's ruminations about religion. The first half, I'm told, is only normal boring.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 09:03 am:   

A friend of mine told me his father saw KINGDOM OF HEAVEN and told him that not only he should not bother seeing it at the theater, he should make sure it never gets in his Netflix queue. Apparently boredom was a big problem.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 10:01 am:   

So far, Orlando Bloom has managed to make the Trojan War and the Crusades dull. I think his ambition must be to write an entire Boring History of Western Civilization. Can't wait for his remake of QUO VADIS!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 10:22 am:   

well, I don;t think it's really him. Blame Peterson and Scott.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 12:33 pm:   

I watched part of the Criterion release of SWORD OF DOOM last night. It looks like a great dark Samurai film. Unfortunately, I was so exhausted that I started nodding off around the 30 minute mark, so I decided to hold off until I have energy to spare for subtitles.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 01:18 pm:   

I'm sure it's good, but for my part I'm up to here with samurai flicks, and flicks like House of flying daggers...

Hara Kiri may have finished me off...for a while, anyway...
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 02:01 pm:   

I've got this and Twilight Samurai in the hopper, but I do know what you mean. I skipped House of FD.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 02:12 pm:   

You have a hopper? :-)

I looking forward to the SIFF this weekend. Going to see a couple of flicks. Brothers, a Dutch political drama, and Layer Cake, a brit crime flick. They're no ATTACK OF THE SITH, or MR SITH GOES TO WASHINGTON, or whatever, but they may compensate...

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